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Security Awareness for IT Users – InfoSec Institute
InfoSec Institute is consistently rated as one of the top providers for Security Awareness Program training for users of IT systems. With a systematic approach, multiple delivery formats (instructor-led, CBT/WBT, SCORM formatted modules), and access to industry recognized subject matter experts, InfoSec Institute has what it takes to raise critical security awareness issues in a thought provoking manner for your organization.

Security Awareness for IT Professionals – InfoSec Institute
InfoSec Institute provides a deeper level of security awareness training for technical audiences, honing in on the specific issues that individual IT Professionals need to know in order to secure their infrastructure.

Security Awareness for Software Developers (.NET, Java, C/C++) – InfoSec Institute
Software developers are increasingly under task to develop more secure applications. Without the requisite knowledge, it is an insurmountable task. InfoSec Institute bridges the gap between poorly designed and executed code and secure code with the internationally recognized Security Awareness for Software Developers line of courses.

You can find other value able security awareness training resources here:

NIST 800-50: Security Awareness and Training Program
This NIST publication provides detailed guidance on designing, developing, implementing, and maintaining an awareness and training program within an agency’s IT security program.

ENISA: A Users� Guide: How to Raise Information Security Awareness
This document illustrates the main processes necessary to plan, org anise and run information security awareness program raising initiatives: plan & assess, execute & manage, evaluate & adjust. Each process is analyses and time-related actions and dependencies are identified. The process modeling presented provides a basis for “kick-starting” the scoping and planning activities as well as the execution and assessment of any security awareness program. The Guide aims to deliver a consistent and robust understanding of major processes and activities amoung users.

NIST 800-16: Information Technology Security Training Requirements (188 pages)
The overall goal for use of this document is to facilitate the development or strengthening of a comprehensive, measurable, cost-effective IT security awareness program which supports the missions of the organization and is administered as an integral element of sound IT management and planning. Protecting the value of an organization�s information assets demands no less. This approach allows senior officials to understand where, in what way, and to what extent IT-related job responsibilities include IT security responsibilities, permitting the most cost-effective allocation of limited IT security training resources.
Appendix A-D Appendix E

Building a Security Awareness Program – CyberGuard
Hackers, worms and viruses grab the headlines, but the real threat often comes not from outside the organization but within. Social engineering and unhappy employees pose very real risks to network security. How do you address the problem? This article offers a practical approach to setting up an effective security awareness program that gets everyone in the organization on board.

Awareness Tips for All Personnel – Gideon T. Rasmussen
Security tips are a key component to any awareness program. They should advise of best practices and reinforce policy.These tips are written with the average person as the intended audience. The site randomly displays information security tips. Companies can use it internally to educate their user community. The site and script are free to download.

Security Awareness Tips by Role – IT Governance Institute
ITGI offers a security baseline for enterprises and security survival kits for a variety of computer users.

Security Awareness Toolbox – The Information Warfare Site
The Security Awareness Toolbox contains many useful documents and links. The Main Documents section was contributed by Melissa Guenther. The Toolbox is a rich source of awareness material.

University of Arizona Security Awareness Page
The UA security awareness site contains awareness presentations, videos and posters. It’s a good site to explore.

NoticeBoard Newsletter
NoticeBored offers a free awareness newsletter covering a different information security topic each month. The newsletter provides an introduction to the monthly topic, describes the information security risks and outlines the remaining security awareness materials delivered to NoticeBored customers.

IIA Tone at the Top Awareness Newsletter
Mission: To provide executive management, boards of directors, and audit committees with concise, leading-edge information on such issues as risk, internal control, governance, ethics, and the changing role of internal auditing; and guidance relative to their roles in, and responsibilities for the internal audit process.

Security Awareness Group – Yahoo Groups
The security awareness group provides a forum to discuss awareness program methodologies and share security awareness tips. Those interested in learning more about information security will benefit from the exchange of tips and the opportunity to ask questions.

Security Awareness Posters

Attentus Healthcare Company in cooperation with DasSign has provided security awareness posters in the interest of public education. These posters can be used and distributed freely without obligation.


Threat Modeling Definition, Investopedia, advanced persistent threat definition.#Advanced #persistent #threat #definition


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Threat Modeling

Advanced persistent threat definition

Advanced persistent threat definition

DEFINITION of ‘Threat Modeling’

In terms of computer security, threat modeling is evaluating what needs to be protected, from whom, the likelihood of an attack and the consequences of inadequate protection, then determining what steps you are willing to take to achieve sufficient protection. Threat modeling accounts for the fact that there are numerous different security risks inherent in using computers, and the risks can vary by user and by organization. As a result, there are many different security measures that individuals and organizations may need to implement, or that may not be worth implementing given their limited resources, depending on the specific threats they face.

BREAKING DOWN ‘Threat Modeling’

To understand threat modeling, think about your personal computer. What do you need to protect? You don’t want an intruder to gain access to the sensitive personal information such as your passwords, tax returns, and emails. You also wouldn’t want someone to steal the computer itself. To evaluate your risk, you would identify what sensitive data is stored on your computer, who has access to your computer and how you are currently protecting your files and your device. Next, you would consider who might want these things: perhaps criminal hackers and burglars. Who else do you need to protect your device and your information from? Maybe an ex-spouse who has ill will toward you or others who live in your household, such as your children.

If the wrong person accessed or stole your computer or your files, what could they do with it that would harm you? Criminal hackers would not only be able to potentially steal your identity with the information on your computer but also make your life difficult by taking away your access to all your files unless you had them backed up securely.

How you decide to defend yourself depends on how strong your potential attackers are and how much risk they pose. If your child is two years old, your computer might be at risk of getting knocked on the floor or having the keyboard damaged by spilled liquids, and your files might be at risk of accidental deletion. Keeping your computer in a locked room or locked cabinet might be sufficient to protect against that risk. Criminals gaining unauthorized access to your computer through the Internet are a much bigger threat that will require you to take measures like installing antivirus and firewall software.

Threat modeling is a personalized process that depends on the individual or organization’s priorities and risk tolerance. Threat modeling is always incomplete, however, because we can never know all the risks associated with computer use. Hackers are always developing new techniques and finding security flaws in developed software. Threat modeling does its best to identify risks, then prioritizes the order in which they should be addressed.

Threat modeling can help organizations understand their true risk of various threats so they can implement the security controls that best limit those risks rather than the security controls that are the most popular or well known. Common threat modeling techniques include Trike, PASTA (Process for Attack Simulation and Threat Analysis), CAPEC (Common Attack Pattern Enumeration and Classification). and Microsoft STRIDE (STRIDE stands for spoofing identity, tampering with data, repudiation, information disclosure, denial of service, and elevation of privilege—all potential threats to a system and its data).

In an enterprise that wanted to evaluate the security risks to one of its systems, threat modeling would consist of gathering and reviewing any system documentation; bringing together a group of people who are experienced with using, designing, supporting and managing that system; discussing the system architecture and thinking strategically about what could go wrong; considering what can be done about it; and documenting the group’s discoveries and observations.

Threat modeling should always be performed in a systematic way, but different approaches may be used depending on the needs of the organization and the people performing it. Threat modeling is commonly performed by software developers, systems managers, and security professionals, but anyone can learn how to do at least some aspects of it. By being proactive, threat modeling can help software, computer services, and computer systems be more secure from the moment they are released, limiting damage to the company and its customers.


DDoS Attack Predictions for 2017 #anti #ddos #tool,ddos #attack #protection #software,ddos #prevention #software,ddos #mitigation #device,ddos #protection #vendors,network #threat #protection


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DDoS Attack Predictions for 2017

In recent months the world has witnessed the rise of new, significant high-volume distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks. With 2016 nearly in the rear-view mirror, at Corero we are preparing for a very busy year ahead. Our threat predictions for 2017 include:

  • Terabit-scale DDoS attacks will become the new norm, impacting ISPs and the Internet backbone itself
  • Novel zero-day reflection and amplification attacks will appear with more frequency, enabling more sophisticated and targeted attacks
  • DDoS attacks will become a top security priority, with increased disruption to businesses and government due to rising threat levels.

The Mirai botnet, which was responsible for a string of attacks in recent months, including the DDoS attack against DNS provider Dyn in October, will continue to evolve as hackers take advantage of the millions of poorly-secured, Internet-connected devices currently in use worldwide. In terms of its size, the Mirai botnet is currently believed to have a population of around 300,000 compromised devices, but its population could increase significantly if hackers amend the source code to include root credentials for other types of vulnerable devices.

Corero predicts that the Mirai botnet will also become more complex in 2017, as hackers evolve and adapt the original package, equipping it with new DDoS attack methods. Mirai is currently believed to contain around ten different DDoS attack techniques or vectors which can be utilized by hackers to initiate an attack. We believe this will increase during 2017 as attackers develop new methods, and then make them open source and available for anyone to use.

While the Mirai botnet is certainly fearsome in terms of its size, its capacity to wreak havoc is also dictated by the various attack vectors it employs. If a variety of new and complex techniques were added to its arsenal next year, we may see a substantial escalation in the already dangerous DDoS landscape, with the potential for frequent, terabit-scale DDoS events that significantly disrupt Internet availability.

The motivations for DDoS attacks are endless, and the range of potential political and economic fallout from such attacks could be far-reaching. Our entire digital economy depends upon access to the Internet, so organizations should think carefully about business continuity in the wake of such events. For example, it may be prudent to have back-up telephone systems in place to communicate with customers, rather than relying solely on VOIP systems, which could also be taken down in the event of an attack.

As an example of the pace of change in the DDoS landscape, the Corero Security Operations Center recently warned of an extremely powerful new zero-day DDoS attack vector which utilizes the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP), and has the potential to amplify attacks by as much as 55x.

Certainly the Internet community needs to prepare for potent attack vectors like this to be added to botnets like Mirai. The combination of zero-day DDoS vectors, Mirai delivery mechanisms and attacker ingenuity would seem to indicate that Terabit-scale attacks could occur more frequently next year and internet availability in states, major geographic regions or even countries could be impacted significantly. Individual DDoS attacks, on average, cost large enterprises $444,000 per incident in lost business and IT spending, so the combined economic impact from an entire region being affected would be extremely damaging.[1]

ISPs Must Play a Role in Reducing DDoS Attacks

In the wake of recent IoT-related DDoS attacks many have encouraged manufacturers to install proper security controls on internet-connected devices before they are issued. That s a step in the right direction, but ISPs also have an important role to play in reducing the number of future DDoS attacks.

At a local level, ISPs could significantly reduce the overall volume of DDoS attacks across their networks by employing systems to detect and remediate infected bots that are used to launch DDoS attacks. Furthermore, they can leverage best practices such as ingress filtering to remove the problem of spoofed IP addresses that are widely used in reflection DDoS attacks. This simple improvement to service provider hygiene would be a great initial step towards reducing the overall volume of DDoS traffic. These steps can t protect against the full spectrum of DDoS attacks, but they would speed up the global response to attacks.

ISPs will find themselves at an important crossroads next year. By working together with governments and the international community, ISPs can strengthen the underpinning infrastructure of the Internet and significantly reduce the volume of malicious traffic flowing across their networks.

It is human nature to reflect on the past and wonder about the future. The good news is that the Internet community is paying attention and network operators, in particular, are actively looking for ways to address this issue. From the conversations I have been having, I see good reason to be optimistic and I am hopeful that the number of volumetric DDoS attacks in two or three years time will be significantly reduced through the combined efforts of ISPs, device manufacturers, security vendors and even government entities. As the IT security community rallies together to better protect the integrity of the Internet, we may make tremendous progress in defending against DDoS attacks.

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A penetration test is done to evaluate the security of a computer system or network by simulating an attack by a malicious user / hacker. The process involves active exploitation of security vulnerabilities that may be present due to poor or improper system configuration, known and / or unknown hardware or software flaws, or operational weaknesses in process or design.

This analysis is carried out from the position of a potential attacker, to determine feasibility of an attack and the resulting business impact of a successful exploit. Usually this is presented with recommendations for mitigation or a technical solution.

About this workshop

This workshop gives an in-depth perspective of penetration testing approach and methodology that covers all modern infrastructure, operating systems and application environments.

This workshop is designed to teach security professionals the tools and techniques required to perform comprehensive information security assessment.

Participants will learn how to design, secure and test networks to protect their organization from the threats hackers and crackers pose. This workshop will help participants to effectively identify and mitigate risks to the security of their organization s infrastructure.

This 40 hour highly interactive workshop will help participants have hands on understanding and experience in Security Assessment.

A proper understanding of Security Assessment is an important requirement to analyze the integrity of the IT infrastructure.

Expertise in security assessment is an absolute requirement for a career in information security management and could be followed by management level certifications like CISA, CISSP, CISM, CRISC and ISO 27001.

There are many reasons to understand Security Assessment:

  • Prepare yourself to handle penetration testing assignments with more clarity
  • Understand how to conduct Vulnerability Assessment
  • Expand your present knowledge of identifying threats and vulnerabilities
  • Bring security expertise to your current occupation
  • Become more marketable in a highly competitive environment

Therefore this workshop will prepare you to handle VA / PT assignments and give you a better understanding of various security concepts and practices that will be of valuable use to you and your organization.

This workshop will significantly benefit professionals responsible for security assessment of the network / IT infrastructure.

  • IS / IT Specialist / Analyst / Manager
  • IS / IT Auditor / Consultant
  • IT Operations Manager
  • Security Specialist / Analyst
  • Security Manager / Architect
  • Security Consultant / Professional
  • Security Officer / Engineer
  • Security Administrator
  • Security Auditor
  • Network Specialist / Analyst
  • Network Manager / Architect
  • Network Consultant / Professional
  • Network Administrator
  • Senior Systems Engineer
  • Systems Analyst
  • Systems Administrator

Anyone aspiring for a career in Security Assessment would benefit from this workshop. The workshop is restricted to participants who have knowledge of ethical hacking countermeasures.

The entire workshop is a combination of theory and hands-on sessions conducted in a dedicated ethical hacking lab environment.

  • The Need for Security Analysis
  • Advanced Googling
  • TCP/IP Packet Analysis
  • Advanced Sniffing Techniques
  • Vulnerability Analysis with Nessus
  • Advanced Wireless Testing
  • Designing a DMZ
  • Snort Analysis
  • Log Analysis
  • Advanced Exploits and Tools
  • Penetration Testing Methodologies
  • Customers and Legal Agreements
  • Rules of Engagement
  • Penetration Testing Planning and Scheduling
  • Pre Penetration Testing Checklist
  • Information Gathering
  • Vulnerability Analysis
  • External Penetration Testing
  • Internal Network Penetration Testing
  • Routers and Switches Penetration Testing
  • Firewall Penetration Testing
  • IDS Penetration Testing
  • Wireless Network Penetration Testing
  • Denial of Service Penetration Testing
  • Password Cracking Penetration Testing
  • Social Engineering Penetration Testing
  • Stolen Laptop, PDAs and Cell phones Penetration Testing
  • Application Penetration Testing
  • Physical Security Penetration Testing
  • Database Penetration testing
  • VoIP Penetration Testing
  • VPN Penetration Testing
  • War Dialing
  • Virus and Trojan Detection
  • Log Management Penetration Testing
  • File Integrity Checking
  • Blue Tooth and Hand held Device Penetration Testing
  • Telecommunication and Broadband Communication Penetration Testing
  • Email Security Penetration Testing
  • Security Patches Penetration Testing
  • Data Leakage Penetration Testing
  • Penetration Testing Deliverables and Conclusion
  • Penetration Testing Report and Documentation Writing
  • Penetration Testing Report Analysis
  • Post Testing Actions
  • Ethics of a Penetration Tester
  • Standards and Compliance