Fastest Way to become an RN #become #a #cna, #school, #nursing, #then, #become, #easier, #apply, #2008, #becoming, #thinking, #going, #hopefully, #about, #appreciated, #find, #year, #degree, #better, #fall, #info, #deeply, #would, #transfering, #opinions, #former, #help, #need, #questions, #here, #some, #with, #this, #most, #efficient, #whats, #fastest, #accepted, #fast


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Fastest Way to become an RN

Here are some of my questions I need opinions and Former RN’s to help with this:

1) Is it easier to become a CNA then apply to Nursing school and try to get in?

2) Is it easier to become an LPN then apply to a Nursing school and try to be accepted?

3) Whats the most efficient and fast way of becoming a RN?

I was thinking about going for my CNA in Jan. of 2008 and hopefully transfering to a nursing school in Fall of 2008. Or is it better to go and find a school for a 2 year degree in LPN or RN then becoming an RN? Any info would be deeply appreciated.

A typical student who goes for a BSN in nursing will take 3.5-4 years.

My situations is this, I am in a private university, no such things as a wait list, more expensive. I started in April of this year, 2007, and will be completed and ready for my NCLEX by June 2009. This includes ALL my pre reqs. Had I already had my pre reqs, I could complete our program in 18 months. I will have my ASN, associates of science in nursing, and be an RN, after I pass NCLEX. Now at that point I will be 2 years into schooling and be an RN. I will take my BSN classes online, as my school offers this as well, this will take 1 more year. and in 3 years time I will have my BSN in nursing. WAY Faster then traditional method. PLUS the last year I will be working and making money, and gaining experience while getting my BSN.

Good luck in what you decide to do.

In my opinion, it would be a waste of time to become a CNA, (unless you just want to work in the nursing arena). You still have to take your prerequisite classes, such as, English, Algebra, World history, Anatomy Physiology, Microbiology etc. You have to complete these core classes with satisfactory grades before taking the NET or Nurse Entrance Test. None of the credits from a CNA program will transfer, but some credits from the LPN program does transfer, it depends on your school. Also an LPN is not a degree program, it is a licencse to practice nursing in your state, you receive a diploma or certificate. My advice is to aim for the top, become an RN.

I can reply to this message on a more personal level. I graduated from a four year school Dec 2005. Couldn’t get a job in my field to save my life. I first thought I wanted to be a teacher, but after even struggling with that decision, I decided to pursue nursing which is something I wanted to do while in school the first go around. Getting there was the problem. It was the middle of the Fall 2006 semester when I decided to got to nursing school. I couldn’t apply for admission into a new school until Spring of 07. My crazy self decided that I could go to the community college, become a CNA (which is now a requirement before they’ll even accept you into an ADN program) then start my pre reqs over the summer. I took general psyc over the summer since I got a D on it during my first degree and a D won’t transfer. I’m now at this school that offers an Accelerated BSN program for those with a degree in a field other than nursing. The program will take 13 months to complete. Basically, if I were you and was planning on applying to an ADN program, I would become a CNA first, especially if it’s a requirement. If you’re planning on going to a four year school, I wouldn’t worry about the NA certification because they’ll certify you after a few semesters into the program. It does help to be a CNA because you’d have relevent experience. But if you don’t want to waste the time to become certified, you could be a volunteer. I just started working as a CNA after being certified in March. I work at a teaching hospital which is cool. I just learned that they have a CNA program that allows you get certified in 2 WEEKS. The program I enrolled in at the community college took 2 MONTHS. As far as the whole LPN thing goes, I probably wouldn’t even waste my time. I’ve been doing some research and from what I’ve read less and less hospitals are hiring LPN’s but if you plan to work at maybe a prison, or a rest home then go for it.

A typical student who goes for a BSN in nursing will take 3.5-4 years.

My situations is this, I am in a private university, no such things as a wait list, more expensive. I started in April of this year, 2007, and will be completed and ready for my NCLEX by June 2009. This includes ALL my pre reqs. Had I already had my pre reqs, I could complete our program in 18 months. I will have my ASN, associates of science in nursing, and be an RN, after I pass NCLEX. Now at that point I will be 2 years into schooling and be an RN. I will take my BSN classes online, as my school offers this as well, this will take 1 more year. and in 3 years time I will have my BSN in nursing. WAY Faster then traditional method. PLUS the last year I will be working and making money, and gaining experience while getting my BSN.

Good luck in what you decide to do.

Wow I really like that method. I wish that was available everywhere.

It really depends on the school you go to.

I have heard others on the board state that their school requires you become a CNA first or give you extra points if you do.

Others schools do not care, won’t even ask that on the application so having it is just a big waste of time. They will not give you extra points or any advantage for doing it.

So pick a school out and work on the requirments that the school you want to go to has.

As far as a LPN it will not help you get into RN school. If you go that route you will have to take pre reqs for the LPN program, and then get accepted, and its tough to get into just like the RN programs. Then once in most take a year, and you will get a certificate. Then you will have to go back to CC and take more pre reqs and reapply to an RN bridge program, get accepted and do that before getting a degree, and sitting for the state exam. Its actually a much longer road.

Here are some of my questions I need opinions and Former RN’s to help with this:

1) Is it easier to become a CNA then apply to Nursing school and try to get in?

2) Is it easier to become an LPN then apply to a Nursing school and try to be accepted?

3) Whats the most efficient and fast way of becoming a RN?

I was thinking about going for my CNA in Jan. of 2008 and hopefully transfering to a nursing school in Fall of 2008. Or is it better to go and find a school for a 2 year degree in LPN or RN then becoming an RN? Any info would be deeply appreciated.

how are you doing.

Which university you study?

Posted by: dreamon
Original Content:

A typical student who goes for a BSN in nursing will take 3.5-4 years.

My situations is this, I am in a private university, no such things as a wait list, more expensive. I started in April of this year, 2007, and will be completed and ready for my NCLEX by June 2009. This includes ALL my pre reqs. Had I already had my pre reqs, I could complete our program in 18 months. I will have my ASN, associates of science in nursing, and be an RN, after I pass NCLEX. Now at that point I will be 2 years into schooling and be an RN. I will take my BSN classes online, as my school offers this as well, this will take 1 more year. and in 3 years time I will have my BSN in nursing. WAY Faster then traditional method. PLUS the last year I will be working and making money, and gaining experience while getting my BSN.

Good luck in what you decide to do.

Wow I really like that method. I wish that was available everywhere.

Last edit by Silverdragon102 on Feb 26, ’09. Reason. to tidy up

I know this thread is old but what school was that where you became an rn in 3 years and then took 1 year to have a bsn??Am I correct when I say to become an rn with a bsn it takes 6 years??is that how it works.


What does RN-BSN mean? (Confused) #that, #this, #school, #confused, #bachelors, #your, #want, #rn-bsn, #some, #nurse, #becoming, #program, #best, #about, #nursing, #future, #thought, #4-year, #make, #mean, #because, #does, #later, #become, #high, #then, #pre-reqs, #really, #simple, #success, #stories, #decisions, #pretty, #know, #questions, #https://youtu.be/iigp3kupctw, #seem, #take, #routes, #understand, #they, #people, #already, #dont, #websites, #several, #help, #career, #which, #went


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What does RN-BSN mean? (Confused)

3 I’m a high school student who aspires to become a nurse and later on a nurse practitioner. Because of this, I want to get my Bachelor’s first, (not ADN) and then move on from there. I obviously need to do my pre-reqs and all that but I’m confused about the path of becoming a RN.

I’m confused on the meaning of RN-BSN. Does this mean that when you are a registered nurse, you go get your bachelors? That doesn’t make sense to me because I thought you needed your Bachelor’s to become an RN.

I’m graduating high school this year and interested in becoming an RN(hopefully an NP later on in the future) but I’m confused on how to go about this.

I hear some folks say that nursing school IS a 4-year college, but some say that you go to a 4-year school, complete your pre-reqs THEN apply to a nursing school. Which is it?

I know my questions seem pretty simple to some but I really want to try to make the best decisions and take the best routes to help me in my future career.

I went on several websites and they say that this program is for people who already are RN’s. I don’t understand this. I thought if you want your Bachelors, you go to a RN-BSN program?

RN to BSN: Success Stories

Last edit by Joe V on Feb 15, ’17

The routes of nursing that pertain to your situation and questions:

1) RN program – usually at a community college or vocational school. Such programs earn you the qualification to sit for an RN license. If at a community college, you probably also earn an associate’s degree at the same time. ASN (Associates of science in nursing). There are also still a few diploma schools out there which are hospital based programs that grant ability to sit for RN licensure. RN programs tend to take 3 years. Either 3 straight years, or 1 year of pre-reqs and 2 years of full-time coursework.

2) RN-BSN program – through a university. Either 4 years of integrated general education, nursing education or 2 years of pre-reqs/gen ed and then 2 years of nursing education, both ending in a bachelor’s degree (Bachelor of science in nursing BSN) along with qualification to sit for RN licensure.

For those who earned their RN directly, there are programs out there specifically for them to earn a BSN (RN-to-BSN), usually 1-2 years.

You might wonder why one would choose option 1 over option 2 since option two is only one year longer and gets you a bachelor’s as well. One reason might be that community colleges are usually less expensive than universities. Another is that community colleges are more likely to offer part-time coursework or alternate schedules for those working full-time jobs.

Finally, each school has it’s own strengths and weaknesses and each student has their own strengths and weaknesses. One school might be well known for structure and if a student knows they do well with structure they might decide to choose that school. If a local school is well-known for training up confident, competent nurses, someone might choose that one over a big name university with new, unproven nursing program.

Good luck with your schooling decisions!

Last edit by jjjoy on Dec 31, ’07

Thanks to everyone who has replied to this thread. I was in the same state of confusion. I am presently going throtugh a 3 year program to earn an RN, By next year i’ll be an RN here in Nigeria. however i intend coming over to the USA to obtain a Bsc in Nursing.
Can anyone recommend a good University and tell the me the requirement?
Thanks.

I’m a high school student to aspires to become a nurse and later on a nurse practitioner. Because of this, I want to get my Bachelor’s first, (not ADN) and then move on from there. I obvisouly need to do my pre-reqs and all that but I’m confused about the path of becoming a RN.

I’m confused on the meaning of RN-BSN. Does this mean that when you are a registered nurse, you go get your bachelors? That dosen’t make sense to me because I thought you needed your Bachelor’s to become an RN.

I’m graduating high school this year and interested in becoming an RN(hopefully an NP later on in the future) but I’m confused on how to go about this.

I hear some folks say that nursing school IS a 4-year college, but some say that you go to a 4-year school, complete your pre-reqs THEN apply to a nursing school. Which is it?

I know my questions seem pretty simple to some but I really want to try to make the best desicions and take the best routes to help me in my future career.

– I went on severel websites and they say that this program is for people who already are RN’s. I don’t understand this. I thought if you want your Bachelors, you go to a RN-BSN program?

there are programs at 4 year colleges/universities that after 4 years, you are an RN with your BSN.

There are many different means to RN-BSN. 1) An person which has a Bachelors of Science in another field can do what they call and bridge program and become an RN. 2) An LPN which desires to further his/her nursing career and continue their studies instead of starting from the beginning 3) An RN which has either a diploma or Associates degree can obtain her Bachelor’s.
And to answer your other part of your question about what direction to go in Nursing, according to what the profession states when you have and Associate Degree you are just considered a technical nurse and with a Bachelors you are a Professional Nurse . Even though when you get your license it will Registered Professional Nurse. Word to the wise, choose the path that works best for you, do not become stressed out and regardless of a big name school or a community college, we are all taught the same things and are all considered nurse. GOD LUCK. spin:


A-1 Auto Salvage to hold auction, then close – Old Cars Weekly #auto #financing


#a-1 auto parts
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A-1 Auto Salvage to hold auction, then close

By: raustin | July 30, 2014

1936 Plymouth two door.

Roswell, N.M. is the source of many secrets, one of which is among the hobby’s best-kept secrets — A-1 Auto Salvage. That secret is coming to an end with the yard’s closing and sale of its contents at auction on Sept. 20.

“The owner wants to get rid of everything that is on [that property] and close it down,” explained yard manager Mario Silva. “The owner’s main focus is recycling.”

Rather than recycle the yard’s 350-400 old cars, A-1 Auto Salvage Recycling will offer its stash of prewar to 1970s cars, trucks and parts to collectors in a no-reserve sale held on-site by Bill Johnston Auctioneers. Those cars not sold at auction will be crushed.

Silva said some of the cars have titles, but the staff is still sorting through the paperwork to determine which cars have them.

A full inventory has not yet been posted, but the yard has many of the solid New Mexico cars pictured on its Facebook page. A flip through these images reveals many 1956-1964 full-size Fords and four-seat Thunderbirds, Studebakers as old as 1940, Falcons galore, several mid-1950s Oldsmobiles, a couple 1957 Buick two-door hardtops, many early Chevelles and 1960s Impalas, finned Imperial four-doors and a few Jeeps, including at least Jeepster convertibles. There are even first-generation Mustangs and a healthy smattering of trucks.

The yard’s inventory of thousands of parts will be offered on pallets and includes many body panels. Silva said there also seems to be a surplus of Volkswagen parts, which correlates with the number of Beetles and Karmann Ghias in the yard’s inventory.

For information, contact the yard or auctioneer. To view Old Cars Weekly’s 2009 article on this yard, go to http://www.oldcarsweekly.com/blogs/salvage-yard-ron/a1_salvage_new_mexico_yard

A-1 Auto Salvage Recycling

204 N Brown Road

Roswell, NM

Bill Johnston Auctioneers


A-1 Auto Salvage to hold auction, then close – Old Cars Weekly #dc #auto #show


#a-1 auto parts
#

A-1 Auto Salvage to hold auction, then close

By: raustin | July 30, 2014

1936 Plymouth two door.

Roswell, N.M. is the source of many secrets, one of which is among the hobby’s best-kept secrets — A-1 Auto Salvage. That secret is coming to an end with the yard’s closing and sale of its contents at auction on Sept. 20.

“The owner wants to get rid of everything that is on [that property] and close it down,” explained yard manager Mario Silva. “The owner’s main focus is recycling.”

Rather than recycle the yard’s 350-400 old cars, A-1 Auto Salvage Recycling will offer its stash of prewar to 1970s cars, trucks and parts to collectors in a no-reserve sale held on-site by Bill Johnston Auctioneers. Those cars not sold at auction will be crushed.

Silva said some of the cars have titles, but the staff is still sorting through the paperwork to determine which cars have them.

A full inventory has not yet been posted, but the yard has many of the solid New Mexico cars pictured on its Facebook page. A flip through these images reveals many 1956-1964 full-size Fords and four-seat Thunderbirds, Studebakers as old as 1940, Falcons galore, several mid-1950s Oldsmobiles, a couple 1957 Buick two-door hardtops, many early Chevelles and 1960s Impalas, finned Imperial four-doors and a few Jeeps, including at least Jeepster convertibles. There are even first-generation Mustangs and a healthy smattering of trucks.

The yard’s inventory of thousands of parts will be offered on pallets and includes many body panels. Silva said there also seems to be a surplus of Volkswagen parts, which correlates with the number of Beetles and Karmann Ghias in the yard’s inventory.

For information, contact the yard or auctioneer. To view Old Cars Weekly’s 2009 article on this yard, go to http://www.oldcarsweekly.com/blogs/salvage-yard-ron/a1_salvage_new_mexico_yard

A-1 Auto Salvage Recycling

204 N Brown Road

Roswell, NM

Bill Johnston Auctioneers