Safe Driving Tips for Teenage Drivers # #teen #drivers, #teen #driver #safety, #car #insurance #


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Safe Driving Tips For Teenage Drivers

It’s a fact: teenage drivers account for more auto accidents than any other age group.

However, by practicing safe driving techniques―such as driving defensively―you’ll increase the odds you’ll keep yourself (and your passengers) safe on the road and you’ll increase your changes of getting more affordable car insurance as you build a good driving record.

Safety Tips for Teen Drivers

Whether you’re just getting ready to hit the road or have been driving for months―or even years―take some time to review these 8 safe driving tips.

1) Keep Your Cell Phone Off

Multiple studies indicate using a cell phone while driving is the equivalent of driving drunk ―that’s even when using a hands-free phone.

NOTE . Your state may prohibit the use of cell phones while driving. An increasing amount of states are creating laws regarding cell phone use and texting. Often, younger drivers face stricter laws.

2) Don’t Text

Research shows texting―on average―causes a loss of focus on the road for 4.6 seconds. You can drive the length of a full football field in that time. A lot can go wrong while you drive the length of a football field without your eyes on the road.

Don’t try the “texting-while-stopped” approach, either, as many states ban texting while behind the wheel. And, when you have your head down, you won’t notice key developments that may occur. Remember, you still need to pay attention to the road when you’re stopped.

3) Turn on Your Headlights

Using your headlights increases your visibility and help other drivers see you, even when you feel like it’s light out.

In the early morning and early evening (dusk), you need to use your lights or other drivers might not see you, which can be disastrous.

4) Obey the Speed Limit

Speeding is a major contributor to fatal teen accidents. That’s especially true when driving on roads with lots of traffic or with which you’re not familiar.

Don’t feel pressured to keep up with traffic if it seems like everyone else is flying by you. Driving a safe speed helps ensure your well-being, and keeps you away from costly traffic tickets that can cause a sharp hike in your auto insurance premiums.

5) Minimize Distractions

It may be tempting to eat, drink, flip around the radio dial, or play music loudly while you’re cruising around town; however, all can cause your mind or vision to wander, even for a few seconds.

As an inexperienced driver, you are more apt to lose control of your car. Distractions can significantly increase the chances that you 1) not notice impending danger or notice it too late and 2) lose the ability to control the vehicle.

6) Drive Solo

Having a single teen passenger in your car can double the risk of causing a car accident. Adding additional teen passengers causes the risk to escalate.

7) Practice Defensive Driving

Always be aware of the traffic ahead, behind, and next to you, and have possible escape routes in mind. Stay at least one car length behind the car in front of you in slower speeds, and maintain a larger buffer zone with faster speeds.

Some car insurance companies will even give you a discount if you take an approved defensive driving course to improve your driving skills.

8) Choose a Safe Car

If possible, drive a safe car with the latest safety equipment (such as anti-lock brakes, electronic stability control, and air bags), and one with an excellent crash safety record.

Final Word: Teens Becoming Safe Drivers

There’s no substitute for driving experience and the wisdom that age brings, but by applying the above tips you’ll enhance the odds you won’t become a teenage driver accident statistic. Also, when you have a good driving record free of accidents, it’s easier to find cheap car insurance in the future.

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Car insurance for young drivers #young #driver #car #insurance, #teen #drivers, #teen #car #insurance, #teenager #car #insurance #rates, #car #insurance #discounts #for #teenagers, #car #insurance #for #young #drivers


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Car insurance for young drivers

Starting to drive is an exciting moment for teens, but for their parents, it can be stressful and it will certainly be expensive. The good news is that you can check quotes from different insurance companies and minimize the damage to your wallet. Let us guide you through buying car insurance for young drivers to help you save money.

Policies

Before your teen starts driving, you should know:

  • All drivers in a household need to be added to a car insurance policy. There is no easy or cheap way to get around car insurance for a new driver. Either you need to add your teen to your policy, or the teen needs his own policy.
  • Sharing a joint policy with a teen is cheaper than paying for separate policies. Additionally, there is no benefit to a teen getting his own policy. This doesn’t mean, however, that you should simply add your teen to your current policy and be done with it. Adding a new driver means your company generates your rates all over again, and a different company may give you a better deal. Shop around by getting quotes from several companies.

Do I have to add my teen once he has a learner s permit?

The process of insuring a new driver typically starts when the teen gets a learner’s permit. Once teens get a learner’s permit (aka provisional license or instruction permit in some states), some companies allow you to add them to your policy at no additional charge until they get their licenses or turn 18. They allow this because state permit-holder laws require a licensed driver age 21 or older in the passenger seat, making the young driver less of a risk. Other auto insurance providers require that teens be added when they are in the permit stage, so check with your provider.

Start now by finding car insurance companies in your area

Do I have to add my teen to my policy if he doesn t own a car?

Yes. It doesn t matter that he doesn t have his own car; he has access to yours. If you don t add him to your policy and he is in an accident, your policy may not cover him. Some car insurance companies explicitly note in their policies that unless you notify them of additional drivers or risks, those individuals will not be covered. If they do cover the accident, the insurer may require you to pay back premiums from the time the teen was licensed.

If your teen is getting a license but isn t going to drive your cars — ever — then in some states, some insurers will let you exclude the teen from your policy. If you do exclude a teen, or anyone, from your policy, there will be no car insurance coverage extended if they are in an accident. Many insurance companies want you to tell them about household residents who are over a certain age (usually 15) whether that person is licensed or not.

Do I have to tell my insurance company about my teen if he isn t licensed?

Yes, you usually do. When you renew your policy, you are usually asked for information on everyone in your household. If your child hasn t received a permit or license yet, the teen usually can be listed as unlicensed on your policy. When a young driver is noted as unlicensed, he also should be unrated by the car insurance company, meaning the teen wouldn’t affect your rates.

Who should insure a teen if the parents are divorced?

In general, the custodial parent s policy is primary for the newly licensed driver. However, if the child will drive when staying at the second home, both parents typically need to list the teen as a driver. Car insurance companies deal with this situation differently, so check with your company and ask what your new rates will be. This way you ll know what to shoot for if you decide to shop around for a better deal.

How can a teen get his own policy?

A teen driver can get a car insurance policy of his own, but if he s under 18, a parent or guardian signature is required on the policy since insurance is a legal contract. Even if you are willing to sign on the policy with a young driver, keep in mind that it s cheaper if the teen is added to your policy instead. Read our age-specific guides for teen drivers to see how rates differ depending on whether the teen is on his own policy or the parent;s:

Rates

How much does car insurance for new drivers cost?

Our analysis of the cost of adding a teen driver showed an average increase of 160% when a married couple added a teenage boy to their car insurance policy. This number can only be used to give you a very general sense of how much your rates will increase. Every situation is different, and rates depend on your insurance provider, coverage options, ZIP code, vehicles, driving records, how much you drive and many more factors.

Why is car insurance for young drivers so expensive?

Teens are inexperienced behind the wheel and immature by nature. That’s a bad combination. A brand-new driver is 12 times more likely to have an accident than someone with a year of experience, says the National Institutes of Health. A 16-year-old who s had one accident is 50 percent more likely to have another, says the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration. In addition, maturity levels change quickly. Teens who get their licenses at age 18 have fewer fatal accidents than those who are licensed at age 16. Many insurers no longer lump all young drivers together but instead rate age groups separately.

At what age do young drivers’ rates go down?

The age of 25 is typically when insurance companies begin to offer the same rates they do to all other adults. Some carriers will lower rates for women when they turn 21 and men when they turn 24. Once you re no longer priced as a young driver, your insurance provider will rate you based on your driving record rather than those for young drivers in general. In addition to rating drivers based on age, insurers can also levy a surcharge for inexperience, usually for those who have been licensed less than a year. To get a better sense of how insurance rates change by age, see average insurance rates by age .

Discounts

Good student discount

Encourage your kid to do well in school because student car insurance discounts can help bring down your rates. Each insurer has its own guidelines, but typically the discount can be 10 percent to 15 percent. Each insurer always has its own rule for what constitutes a good student either a 3.0 grade point average or above, placement on dean s list or honor roll, or ranking in the top 20 percent of the class.

Safe driver discount

Look into discounts for new drivers who take a safe-driver course, sometimes sponsored by the insurance company. This may mean attending an actual classroom driver s education class, watching a driving video, or passing a written driving safety test. Your company may also offer discounts if the teen drives with devices that monitor driver behavior.

Cars for Teen Drivers

Given the cost of car insurance for your teen, you may want him driving a car this is cheap to buy and cheap to insure. Check out our list of the 20 best used cars for teens .

The least expensive cars to buy aren t always the least expensive to insure. Some cars cost more to repair after an accident, and some have a record of more injury claims than others do. And the least expensive car to insure may not be the safest. Electronic equipment such as stability control and antilock brakes can help novice drivers avoid accidents, and there can be a discount for having them. The lowest car insurance rates are often given to drivers with minivans and small SUVs.

Insurance for College Students

When a teen moves out to go to college, you ve got another car insurance decision to make, based on whether the teen owns a car, how far he moves, if he s going to drive a family car while in town, etc. Read our guide to car insurance for college students to get guidance for your unique case.


Menstruation: The Menstrual Cycle, How Long Periods Last, Cramping, and More #period, #menstruation, #puberty, #menarche, #women, #girl, #teen, #menstrual #cycle, #blood, #bleeding, #pad, #tampon, #ovulation, #cycle, #egg, #ovary, #uterus, #vagina, #symptoms, #pms, #cramp, #bloat


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All About Menstruation

Ever wonder what really happens during menstruation. when a girl enters puberty and has her period? Maybe you’ve wanted to talk to your mom, sister, or dad about it. But each time you said the word “menstruation ,” you stuttered, stammered, and could barely pronounce it.

It’s OK. Everyone is timid when talking about bodily functions, especially one as mysterious as the menstrual period. Perhaps this article can answer some of your questions about this normal time in every girl’s life.

What Is Menstruation?

Shortly after the beginning of puberty in girls, and usually about 2 years after the development of breasts. menstruation starts. While menstruation usually begins between ages 12 and 13, it may happen at a younger or older age. The first menstrual period is called “menarche .”

The menstrual cycle is about four weeks long, starting on the first day of bleeding and ending when the next period begins. However, it can vary greatly when a girl first starts her period. It may skip months or come several times per month in the beginning.

The menstrual discharge comes from the uterus through the vagina. The uterus is a hollow, pear-shaped organ, responsible for maintaining and nourishing the embryo and fetus during a pregnancy. The vagina. or “birth canal,” provides a path for menstrual fluids to leave the body.

During a period, there are usually 2-3 days of relatively heavy bleeding followed by 2-4 days of lighter flow. The fluid during a menstrual period is a mixture of uterine lining tissue and blood .

The total mo nthly menstrual loss varies from about 4 to 12 teaspoons.

What Does a Menstrual Period Feel Like?

A few days before and during your period, you might feel cramping and bloating in your abdomen. The cramps are caused by increased production of hormones. These hormones (called prostaglandins) cause the muscles of the uterus to contract.

Many teens who have cramps also notice aching in the upper thighs along with lower back pain. Some also notice nausea. diarrhea. irritability, headaches. and fatigue. among other symptoms.

To ease cramping, try applying heat to your abdomen with a heating pad or hot water bottle. Taking a warm bath may also help. Some teens find that exercise helps relieve cramps. Exercise improves blood flow and produces endorphins, the body’s natural painkillers.

Continued

Simple but effective non-prescription pain relieving medications can ease symptoms. These include acetaminophen (Tylenol ) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs ). NSAIDs include medications like ibuprofen (such as Motrin and Advil ) and naproxen (such as Aleve ). These drugs block the effects of prostaglandin hormones.

Discuss symptoms with your primary health care practitioner, so you can find the best medications and dosage.

Talk to your primary health care provider or your gynecologist if:

  • Your cramps are severe
  • Your bleeding is excessive, lasts longer than 7 days, occurs often or at the wrong time of your cycle
  • If you have not had your first period by age 16
  • If it has been 3 months since your last period
  • You think you might be pregnant
  • You develop fever and feel sick after tampon use

Cramps are normally worst during the first two to three days of your period, then ease as prostaglandin levels in the body return to normal. If cramps stay about the same throughout your period, or if over-the-counter painkillers don’t really work, see a doctor.

Always ask your primary health care provider any questions you have about your period, making sure you clearly and completely describe any concerns.

How Long Does a Period Last?

Your first period may last from two to seven days. Then, there might be 21 to 40 days or even longer before you have another period. Your next period might be heavier or lighter than the first.

Don’t worry if your early periods have longer cycles or don’t follow a schedule. This irregularity is normal for at least the first 2 years.

Your periods should become more regular within two years after you start menstruating. Some teens have a 28-day cycle; some have a 24-day cycle; others have a 30- to 34-day cycle. All of these are normal. For young teens, cycles can range from 21 to 45 days. For adults, it can be 21-35 days. If your period is much shorter or longer, or if your period does not become regular after two years, see your primary health care provider.

Continued

It is possible to skip a month, especially if you have been ill or under stress. (Tell your health care provider at once, however, if you miss a period and are having s exual intercourse. Even if you are using effective birth control. pregnancy is a possibility!) But skipping for more than one month once your periods have become regular is another reason for a doctor visit.

When your period becomes regular, mark the date on your calendar for several months ahead. This will remind you to have tampons or pads on hand and help prevent accidents.

What Is Ovulation?

Ovulation is the release of a mat ure egg from a woman’s ovary. It usually happens around mid cycle (about 14 days from the start of your last period).

Some might feel abdominal discomfort at the time of ovulation. but it’s usually very brief. This discomfort, medically called by its German name mittelschmerz (pain in the middle), can usually be relieved by the same medication used for cramps.

What About PMS?

Premenstrual syndrome. or PMS. happens to many teens right before their periods start. With PMS, you might feel:

  • Mild breast tenderness
  • Fluid retention
  • Anxiety
  • Dietary cravings
  • Irritability
  • Difficulty sleeping or excessive sleeping

When menstruation begins, PMS symptoms decrease.

Some young women find that they cry easily and are more emotional during this time. Understanding the feelings that come with PMS may help you cope with the emotions. If your symptoms are serious and interfere with your life, discuss them with your health care practitioner.

Should I Use Tampons or Pads?

Teens can use tampons, pads, or both during their period. Tampons are worn inside the vagina and come in a variety of sizes (small to large) with different absorbencies (light to super heavy). It’s important to change a tampon at least every four to 8 hours to avoid leakage and serious bacterial infections. According to the company Tampax, you can wear a tampon overnight, but insert a new one before bed and change it first thing in the morning.

Continued

Pads are usually self-adhesive and worn inside the underwear. You can find pads for light days, heavy days, and overnight. Change pads at least every four hours to avoid leakage and odor.

It’s important to understand your body as you decide on tampons or pads. Girls who participate in sports may find tampons less bulky and restrictive than pads. Girls are able to swim with tampons. Still, other girls think tampons are uncomfortable and prefer to use pads. It may take a while to find the right product for you.

Whether you choose tampons or pads, keep extras in your school locker or in a side pocket of your purse. Change the tampon or pad more frequently on heavy days to avoid an embarrassing stain on your clothes.

If you ever have trouble taking a tampon out, see your health care practitioner immediately. Tampons should be changed at least every 4 to 8 hours. Use the lowest absorbency tampon you can depending on your flow. Tampon use increases risk for toxic shock syndrome compared to pad use, especially if you don’t change tampons frequently enough or use highest absorbency tampons on the lightest flow days. Toxic shock syndrome is a life-threatening disease related to toxins from bacteria.

Is It Normal to Miss a Period?

Many things, such as the stress of exams or an illness like the flu. can cause you to skip a period. Too much exercise and low body weight may also cause the loss of your menstrual period. If you continue to miss your period, be sure to talk to your doctor.

What If I’m 16 and Haven’t Yet Started My Period?

If yo u are age 16 and still have not started your period, talk to your doctor to make sure there are no problems.

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Dan Brennan, MD on April 24, 2017

Sources

WebMD Medical Reference: Normal Menstrual Cycle.

Cool Nurse.com: “What You Need to Know About Menstruation.”

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: “Especially for Teens: Menstruation.”

The National Women’s Health Information Center: “Menstruation and the Menstrual Cycle.”

Tampax: Usage questions: “Can I use a tampon overnight?”

© 2017 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.


Teen Car Accidents #teen #car #accidents, #crash, #teenager, #auto #accident, #articles, #photo, #teenage, #male #driver, #driving #picture, #teen #car #accidents #statistics, #statistics #on #teen #car #accidents, #pictures, #junior #operator #license, #restrictions, #youth, #teenage #car #accidents, #of #teenage #car, #accidents #teenagers, #to #accidents #most, #cause #most #teenage, #teenage, #drivers #who, #cause #of #car, #in #the #car, #driving #techniques #that, #techniques #and #driving, #photos, #story, #young, #inexperience, #speed, #wrecks, #crash, #accidents, #crashed #cars, #crashed, #auto #accident #picture, #teens, #car #wreck, #motor, #road, #part, #video, #vehicle, #accidents, #teenagers, #wrecked, #car #accident #crashed.


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Teen Car Accidents. Teenage Car Crashes.
Car Crashes are the leading cause of death for teens in the United States and accidents while driving cause 36% of all deaths in this age group according to the Centers for Disease Control. Drive Safer!

Teenage Driver Facts:
Deaths. Each Year over 5,000 teens ages 16 to 20 Die due to Fatal injuries caused Car accidents. About 400,000 drivers age 16 to 20 will be seriously injured.

Risks. The risk of being involved in a car accident the highest for drivers aged 16- to 19-year-olds than it is for any other age group. For each mile driven, teen drivers ages 16 to 19 are about four times more likely than other drivers to crash.

Stats. Teenagers are about 10 percent of the US Population but account for 12 percent all Fatal Car Crashes.

Costs. Drivers (both male and female) under age 24 account for 30% – $26 billion Dollars of the total costs of Car accidents in the US.

Male Versus Female. The car accident death rate for teen male drivers and passengers is more than one and a half times female teen driver (19.4 killed per 100,000 male drivers compared with 11.1 killed per 100,000 female drivers.

New Drivers. The risk of a Crash risk is much higher during the first year teenagers are able to drive.

Two Teenagers Killed

Warrensburg, Illinois

Teen Speeding Road Rage Crash

Atlanta, Georgia

Teen Drinking Crash

Minneapolis, MN

Why are Teenager Drivers at More Risk? According to Studies: Teenager drivers tend to underestimate hazardous driving situations and are less able than older drivers to recognize dangerous situations.

Teenager Drivers are more to speed and tailgate.

Having Male teen passengers in the car has been shown to increase the likelihood of high risk driving behaviors among teenage male drivers.

Of Male drivers killed between 15 and 20 years of age 38% were speeding and 24% had been drinking and driving .

Teens have the lowest rate of seat belt use. According to surveys about 10% of high school students report they do not wear seat belts.

Trailers Suck

Teen Encounters one

More Teen Accident Facts: About 23% of drivers ages 15 to 20 who died in car crashes had a Blood Alcohol Counts of 0.08 or higher.

About 30% of teens reported that within the previous 30 days, they had been a passenger in a car with a driver who had been drinking alcohol. One in 10 teens said that they personally had driven after drinking alcohol.

Teen drivers killed in auto crashes after drinking and driving. 74% did not wear a seat belt.

More than half of teen deaths from car crashes occurred between 3 p.m. and midnight and 54% occurred on weekends: Friday, Saturday, or Sunday.

16 Year Old Shattered Knee Cap

Florida

Junior Operator License

Utica, NY

Jaws of Life Save Teen

Pacific Heights, California

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Teen Drug & Alcohol Rehab Program #teenage #substance #abuse, #teenagers, #teen, #drug #rehab, #addiction, #drug #rehab #program, #rehab #program, #teen #alcoholism


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Teen Rehab Programs

Most teens experiment with drugs and alcohol, but some, especially those vulnerable to addiction, fall into trouble in a hurry.

And to make matters worse, for developmental reasons, adolescents rarely admit to addiction and almost never seek help on their own.

It’s up to parents to intervene and according to the National Institute on Drug Addiction, the earlier you intervene the better.

  • Drug and alcohol abuse does greater brain damage to teens than adults.
  • Teens who develop early substance use disorders are more likely to struggle with lifelong addiction challenges.
  • Teens who abuse drugs and alcohol during adolescence may not complete all the necessary developmental tasks of this life-stage.
  • Early drug and alcohol abuse can cause social, legal and academic problems and lifelong consequences.

So if an adolescent you love abuses drugs or alcohol, and you can’t get them to stop, you need to intervene quickly and find appropriate professional help.

Note – treatment doesn’t always – or even usually – mean rehab. In most cases, adolescent treatment occurs on an outpatient basis, with the teen client staying at home, with family.

Finding Quality Treatment

Beyond timely intervention, you also need to make sure you find quality adolescent-specific treatment.

  • Teens aren’t just mini-adults and treatment that works for adults won’t necessarily resonate with adolescents. You need to find an adolescent-specific program that’s designed to keep teens engaged in the process, that helps them self-recognize the problem and its consequences and that teaches them the essential skills they’ll need to survive, and thrive, as they grow into adulthood.
  • If early life or more recent traumatic experiences contribute to the problem, you also need to find trauma-sensitive care in a safe and supportive environment – confrontational or boot-camp style programs can actually worsen your child’s problems.

Make contact today to learn more about teen-specific treatment and take a first step now to helping your son or daughter escape the devastating negatives of drug or alcohol abuse and addiction.

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Highlights

  • Teens Rarely See a Problem. Adolescents rarely self-recognize addiction and almost never ask for help on their own – it’s up to parents and loved-ones to intervene.
  • Early Intervention is Critical. Teens experience a quicker progression to addiction than adults, and substance abuse in adolescence can lead to lifelong consequences.
  • The Importance of Teen-Specific Treatment. Adolescent specific treatment is designed to help teens self-recognize their problems and stay engaged in the treatment process.

Page last updated Aug 15, 2014


Teen Drug Abuse of Cough Medicine: Warning Signs #cough #medicine, #cold #medicine, #adolescent, #teen, #warning #signs, #otc, #over #the #counter #drug #abuse, #signs #of #drug #use, #signs #of #drug #abuse, #nonprescription #drug #abuse, #mood #swings, #weight #changes, #sleep #patterns, #rage, #grades, #study #habits, #friends


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Next Article:

Skip to Article Content

  • 9 Warning Signs of Teen Drug Abuse Would you know if your teen was abusing cough and cold medicine?
  • Hiding Drugs in Plain Sight DXM is in almost every home. Are you tempting your teen?
  • Checklist: How to Help Your Teen Hands-on advice about how to help protect your teen from drugs.
  • The Rise in Cough Medicine Abuse It’s cheap, easy to get — and very dangerous.
  • One Girl’s Story of Addiction Kristin was just 15 when she first tried getting high on cough medicine.
  • A Mother’s Struggle She says she should have seen the signs. She had no idea her daughter was in trouble.
  • How Kids Get Hooked They say, “What’s the big deal? It’s only cough syrup!”
  • Teens Take a Stand The truth? Most teens don’t use drugs. These tips can help teens take a stand.
  • Making the Right Decisions Check out these common situations. How would you react?
  • Role Playing for Teens and Parents Read over these scenarios together. Act them out with your teen.
  • Tips on Teachable Moments Your teen needs more than a single “talk” about drugs.
  • Common Drug Slang Have you heard these words? Get to know drug slang to help protect your child.
  • 5 Teen Behavior Problems Does your teen defy you a lot? Here’s how to nip behavior problems in the bud.
  • Teens and Peer Pressure Friends play a subtle role in your child’s decisions.
  • When Teens Lie About Drugs It’s a fact: Teens lie about drugs — and too often parents believe them.
  • Teen Depression: Symptoms and Tips Many teens are irritable or moody. How can you tell when it’s really depression?
  • 5 Mistakes Parents Make The top mistakes parents make with tweens and teens — and how to avoid them.
  • Monitoring Your Teen Online Should you monitor your teen’s online activity? Here are points to consider.
  • Teen Privacy: When to Cross the Line Do the dangers of drug abuse override your teen’s right to privacy?
  • Friends: A Bad Influence? 9 Things to Do When You’re Worried
  • 10 Things to Tell Your Teen Real-life advice and how to get through.
  • Preparing Tweens for Middle School Get tips to help your tween cope with this exciting but risky time.

Spotting Teen Drug Abuse of Cough Medicine: Tips for Parents

How do you know if your teen is abusing cough or cold medicines? Experts say the signs of teen drug abuse or misuse tend to be the same, regardless of the type of drug being abused, whether legal or illegal. Here are some signs of teen drug abuse to look for:

  • Grades. Have your teen’s grades or study habits declined? Sometimes, drug abuse can send a straight-A student to the verge of flunking out. Often, a sign of drug abuse is a slump that’s not quite so dramatic. A teenager might become less diligent about handing in assignments, forget to study for tests, stop participating in class, or skip classes altogether.
  • Friends. Has your teen stopped hanging around with usual friends? Have new faces – including some that might make you uneasy — suddenly started to appear? Your teenager may abandon long-term friends, especially if they are not involved in the same abusive behavior.
  • Mood. Have you noticed mood swings in your teen? Has your teenager become oddly manic, suddenly furious, sad, or listless? These can sometimes be a sign of drug abuse. You may notice that your teen also spends more time alone, away from family.
  • Appearance. Has your teen’s appearance changed significantly? You may notice that your teen has been wearing the same shirt for a few days, stopped showering regularly, or completely changed his or her style of clothing.
  • Eating. Have you noticed any big changes in how your teen is eating, either more or less? You should not ignore any changes in weight .
  • Sleep . Has your teen’s sleep pattern changed? Depending on the drug being abused, he or she might suddenly seem to sleep all day – or never seem to sleep at all.
  • Secretiveness. Has your teen become excessively secretive about after-school activities, or strangely anxious if you get anywhere near his or her belongings?
  • Sickness. Does your teen frequently ask for cough or cold medicine? Obviously, you don’t want to dismiss signs that your child is sick with a cold or respiratory infection. But if your teen is always demanding medicine for a cough. it could be a sign of drug abuse.
  • Hidden trash. Have you found empty bottles of medicine or empty packages in the trash? If your teen is buying cough medicine on his own, and using it without telling you, it could be a sign of drug abuse.

These signs don’t prove your teen is abusing over-the-counter drugs; after all, mood swings, changes in sleep patterns, and secretiveness are a part of adolescence. But if you notice anything different about your child, it may be time for a talk. Read on to learn more about how to address the subject with him or her.


Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program #teen #pregnency


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Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program

OAH leads a new evidence-based initiative to reduce teen pregnancy, HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and risky sexual behavior among adolescents. Funding from the Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program (TPP) supports competitive grants to public and private entities to fund medically accurate and age-appropriate programs that reduce teen pregnancy and the federal costs associated with administration and evaluation. A key component underlying OAH’s grant programs is an independent, systematic review of the evidence base on programs to reduce teen pregnancy, STDs, and associated sexual risk behaviors. The review identifies, assesses, and rates the rigor of program evaluation studies and describes the strength of evidence supporting different program models. Findings are used to identify program models that meet the criteria for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Teen Pregnancy Prevention Evidence Review. Identifying these evidence-based programs allows for replication and testing of the programs in different settings or with different populations to learn more about the programs’ effectiveness, and to undertake and test new, innovative programs or to test significant adaptations to an evidence-based program.

The Office of Adolescent Health administers a two-tiered Teen Pregnancy Prevention grant program and works in concert with closely aligned programs supported by other federal agencies.

  • Replication of Evidence-Based Programs. OAH funds replications of 23 of the program models from the HHS Teen Pregnancy Prevention Evidence Review through 75 different grantees, with some grantees replicating more than one model. Funded organizations selected the program model or models to replicate based on their communities’ needs. The evaluation of these replications will contribute additional knowledge about these program models.
  • Research and Demonstration Projects. To develop and test additional models and innovative strategies to prevent teen pregnancy, OAH funds 19 TPP research and demonstrations programs, and the Administration on Children and Families (ACF) funds an additional 13 innovative strategy projects targeting vulnerable populations, such as youth in foster care and homeless youth. OAH also provides funds for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to implement and test community-wide approaches to teen pregnancy prevention, focusing on eight communities with very high teen birth rates. These federal agencies collaborate to provide technical assistance, information exchange, and reporting among grantees.

In addition, the Affordable Care Act provides funding to replicate evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention program models through the Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP), administered by the Family Youth Service Bureau (FYSB) within ACF. The ACF/FYSB programs include competitive PREP Innovative Strategies (PREIS) cooperative agreement grants, which were issued in conjunction with the OAH research and demonstration grants.

A performance measurement system was implemented in 2012 to track standard measures across all TPP grantees. Performance measures include grant-level measures of the processes and accomplishments of the project and participant-level measures of the perceived impact of the program on the young people that it serves. In addition, the system involves multiple levels of evaluations.


Safety group lists best used cars for teen drivers – LA Times #auto #accessories


#best used cars
#

Safety group lists best used cars for teen drivers

What are the best used cars for teen drivers?

Many teens are driving cars that are poorly matched to their driving skills, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

The institute released its first list of recommended used vehicles for teens Wednesday after finding in a survey of 500 parents that 83% bought a used, rather than new, car for their teen to drive.

The organization reviewed crash ratings and safety features such as electronic stability control systems for used cars and then obtained price data from Kelley Blue Book to build its list.

Mindful that families can have varying budgets, the group recommended cars along a broad spectrum of prices. It recommended, for instance, the Lincoln MKS from the 2009 model year, which starts at about $15,500, but also 2006 to ’08 Volkswagen Passats, which start at about $5,000 on the used market.

These lists of recommended used vehicles can help consumers factor in safety in addition to affordability, said Adrian Lund, the group’s president.

The institute found that teens tend to drive small or subcompact cars that don’t offer good crash protection and also older cars, from the 2006 model year or earlier. That’s a problem because older vehicles are less likely to have important safety features such as electronic stability control and side air bags.

Full list: Insurance Institute’s recommended used cars for teens

Jerry Hirsch

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Teenagers killed in crashes are more likely than adults to have been behind the wheel of small and older vehicles, the institute said. Among fatally injured drivers ages 15 to 17 from 2008 through 2012, 29% were in small or subcompact cars. That compared with 20% for drivers ages 35 to 50.

Select bigger cars that have the mass to protect occupants in an accident.

Put young drivers in vehicles equipped with electronic stability control, which helps a driver maintain control of the vehicle on curves and slippery roads. Such systems are as important as seat belts, the insurance group said.

You don’t want to get your kid the spiffy red BMW that will be tempting to race. – Rosemary Shahan, president of Consumers for Auto Reliability and Safety

Parents should also pick vehicles with good Insurance Institute for Highway Safety and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration safety ratings.

You don’t want to get your kid the spiffy red BMW that will be tempting to race, said Rosemary Shahan, president of Consumers for Auto Reliability and Safety.

Parents purchasing a used car for their teen should also check to see if the vehicle has been recalled but not fixed, Shahan said.

There are something like 36 million cars out there that have a pending recall, Shahan said.

The insurance group found that, on average, parents spend about $9,800 on a car for a teen. But the median point of car purchases for teens is far lower, at just $5,300.

Unfortunately, it’s very difficult to get a safe vehicle for a teenager at the prices most people are paying, said Anne McCartt, Insurance Institute for Highway Safety senior vice president for research. Our advice to parents would be to remember the risks teens take and consider paying a little more.

All the cars on the group’s list have electronic stability control and provide good crash protection.

The group’s best choices for less than $20,000 also have good ratings for side crash protection, good head restraints and seats for rear crash protection, and good roof strength to protect occupants in rollover crashes.

Vehicles considered good choices for less than $10,000 have good or acceptable side crash protection and head restraints rated better than poor.


Safety group lists best used cars for teen drivers – LA Times #auto #care


#best used cars
#

Safety group lists best used cars for teen drivers

What are the best used cars for teen drivers?

Many teens are driving cars that are poorly matched to their driving skills, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

The institute released its first list of recommended used vehicles for teens Wednesday after finding in a survey of 500 parents that 83% bought a used, rather than new, car for their teen to drive.

The organization reviewed crash ratings and safety features such as electronic stability control systems for used cars and then obtained price data from Kelley Blue Book to build its list.

Mindful that families can have varying budgets, the group recommended cars along a broad spectrum of prices. It recommended, for instance, the Lincoln MKS from the 2009 model year, which starts at about $15,500, but also 2006 to ’08 Volkswagen Passats, which start at about $5,000 on the used market.

These lists of recommended used vehicles can help consumers factor in safety in addition to affordability, said Adrian Lund, the group’s president.

The institute found that teens tend to drive small or subcompact cars that don’t offer good crash protection and also older cars, from the 2006 model year or earlier. That’s a problem because older vehicles are less likely to have important safety features such as electronic stability control and side air bags.

Full list: Insurance Institute’s recommended used cars for teens

Jerry Hirsch

trb_nav_signinLine a a.trb_nav_:hover, a.trb_nav_:focus .trb_nav_submenulink a.trb_nav_submenulink:hover, a.trb_nav_submenulink:focus .trb_bylines_name_author a:hover

Teenagers killed in crashes are more likely than adults to have been behind the wheel of small and older vehicles, the institute said. Among fatally injured drivers ages 15 to 17 from 2008 through 2012, 29% were in small or subcompact cars. That compared with 20% for drivers ages 35 to 50.

Select bigger cars that have the mass to protect occupants in an accident.

Put young drivers in vehicles equipped with electronic stability control, which helps a driver maintain control of the vehicle on curves and slippery roads. Such systems are as important as seat belts, the insurance group said.

You don’t want to get your kid the spiffy red BMW that will be tempting to race. – Rosemary Shahan, president of Consumers for Auto Reliability and Safety

Parents should also pick vehicles with good Insurance Institute for Highway Safety and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration safety ratings.

You don’t want to get your kid the spiffy red BMW that will be tempting to race, said Rosemary Shahan, president of Consumers for Auto Reliability and Safety.

Parents purchasing a used car for their teen should also check to see if the vehicle has been recalled but not fixed, Shahan said.

There are something like 36 million cars out there that have a pending recall, Shahan said.

The insurance group found that, on average, parents spend about $9,800 on a car for a teen. But the median point of car purchases for teens is far lower, at just $5,300.

Unfortunately, it’s very difficult to get a safe vehicle for a teenager at the prices most people are paying, said Anne McCartt, Insurance Institute for Highway Safety senior vice president for research. Our advice to parents would be to remember the risks teens take and consider paying a little more.

All the cars on the group’s list have electronic stability control and provide good crash protection.

The group’s best choices for less than $20,000 also have good ratings for side crash protection, good head restraints and seats for rear crash protection, and good roof strength to protect occupants in rollover crashes.

Vehicles considered good choices for less than $10,000 have good or acceptable side crash protection and head restraints rated better than poor.