Are Extended Car Warranties a Scam? #used #car #search #engine


#auto warranty companies
#

Are Extended Car Warranties a Scam?

With reports of consumers submitting warranty claims that never pay out, and lawsuits and settlements related to warranty scams, it’s important to conduct plenty of research on auto warranty companies in order to avoid being duped when buying an extended auto warranty.

According to the vehicle manufacturers, dealers and independent providers we interviewed, every extended auto warranty comes with exclusions, and prices average from $1,500 to $2,000. Consumers should proceed with caution, especially if the solicitation came via the mail or phone.

“A number of these third-party (auto warranty companies) are fly-by-night operations that go belly up within a few years, costing consumers hundreds of dollars in out-of-pocket repairs and leaving them without coverage,” says Ron Montoya, senior consumer advice editor for Edmunds.com. “A third-party warranty is so named because it has no direct business relationship with the product it covers. In this case, your car.”

Buyer beware before purchasing a vehicle extended warranty

Do your research before buying a third-party auto service plan and be sure to read the fine print.

Dean Davis of Chandler, Arizona, says he was duped. After buying a pre-owned 2008 Honda Accord, he rolled the cost of a $2,000 extended warranty into his car loan. “I wanted to ensure the car would not have any major mechanical costs during the finance period,” he says.

However, six months later when the car’s air conditioner malfunctioned, Davis says it compounded into nearly $1,000 worth of damage. “Lo and behold, I was informed that the ‘tier’ of coverage I have doesn’t cover the failure.”

While Davis says he didn’t feel pressured into buying the extended warranty, he thought the warranty package covered everything mechanical and electrical on the car.

“I thought it covered basically everything except deliberate destruction or failure to maintain, such as changing the oil,” he says. “It lists a dizzying array of parts of the engine, transmission, axles, electrical and A/C components. But obviously not the $7 [A/C] relay that caused all my problems.”

Dan Keenoy, general manager of Don Massey Cadillac in Lone Tree, Colorado, said in 2012 that unscrupulous third-party companies prey upon unsuspecting consumers. “It’s buyer beware,” he said. “There are a lot of scams out there.”

Oftentimes, car owners receive phone calls or materials in the mail that appear to be from a legitimate source, namely the car’s manufacturer.

“They’ll say it doesn’t matter what the year, what the make, or what the model is. they’re going to cover it from this point on,” Keenoy added. “That’s absolute total baloney.”

Auto warranty scam leads to settlement

Beware of auto extended warranties with no affiliation with the manufacturer.

For Joyce Garner of Peoria, Arizona, a TV commercial promising extended warranty coverage for used vehicles convinced her to sign up and pay $99 a month for nearly a year to U.S. Fidelis, a company based near St. Louis.

“Every time I’d call them for a claim, they denied it,” she says. “They came up with one reason or another. I finally quit paying them. I’m elderly, I’m on disability and got nothing for paying all that money.”

In July 2012, following a two-year investigation of U.S. Fidelis numerous federal and state agencies, a federal bankruptcy judge in Missouri accepted a settlement in the case that places $14.1 million, garnered from liquidating the assets of owners Cory and Darain Atkinson, into a restitution fund to compensate eligible consumers who submit a valid proof of claim with the bankruptcy court.

Investigators say the men, who also did business as National Auto Warranty Services and Dealer Services, sold warranty packages to as many as 625,000 consumers in 29 states, plus the District of Columbia.

The settlement follows their guilty pleas earlier this year to one count each of federal felony charges of conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud, and filing false tax returns, according to the Missouri AG’s office.

The federal indictment says the pair deceived consumers by marketing and selling worthless vehicle service contracts with no affiliation to an automobile manufacturer, no authority to provide an automobile manufacturer’s factory warranty, and no authority to alter or extend a factory warranty.

In September 2012, Cory Atkinson was sentenced to four years for the state charges and 40 months for the federal charges, and Darain was sentenced to eight years for the state charges and eight years for the federal charges. Both men were ordered to serve their sentences concurrently in federal prison, as well as pay $4 million in restitution to the IRS for conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud and filing false tax returns. The men’s attorneys did not return calls seeking comment.

Also in 2011, the Federal Trade Commission reports it returned nearly $3.2 million to about 4,450 consumers who bought bogus auto warranties from now-defunct Transcontinental Warranty. The FTC alleges Transcontinental hired several telemarketers to blast consumers with illegal prerecorded calls that tricked them into buying vehicle service contracts under the guise that they were extensions of original vehicle warranties.

Settlements with the FTC ban the defendants from telemarketing and require them to pay restitution. In October 2011, the company’s president Christopher Cowart and vice president Cris Sagnelli were sentenced to a five-year prison sentence and a $15,000 fine after pleading guilty to federal fraud charges. Cowart was released in January 2015, Sagnelli in February 2014.

Research auto warranty companies

What most car owners don’t realize is the term “extended warranty” is actually a misnomer. A warranty is a guarantee from the manufacturer of a product to repair or replace it within a specific amount of time, and it’s included in the price. An extended warranty is really a “service contract,” because it’s sold separately for an additional amount of time and costs extra.

To avoid getting scammed, vehicle owners need to thoroughly research the auto warranty companies they’re considering for proper business registration and insurance coverage, says Jane Lanzillo, spokeswoman for the Service Contract Industry Council. A majority of providers purchase insurance from heavily regulated insurance companies to guarantee the performance of all of their service contracts, she says.

Currently, 37 states require specific registration, including proof of financial backing. Also, the FTC says many service contracts — regardless of who sells them — are handled by independent administrators, who act as claims adjusters, so it’s important to research both the seller and administrator.

Lanzillo cites the top three third-party administrators as Automobile Protection Corp. Advantage Warranty Corp. and Universal Underwriters Service Corp. After you’ve researched the company and looked for the best extended auto warranty, it’s important to understand exactly what’s included in the contract .

“Unfortunately, many consumers buy an extended service contract without taking the time to fully understand what the contract covers,” said National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence spokesman Tony Molla in 2012. “The best advice would be to read the contract carefully before you sign anything.”

“Read the policy. An informed consumer can’t be taken advantage of. – ASE spokesman Tony Molla


Reviews – Legit or Scam? #cheap #car


#auto price finder
#

Auto-Price-Finder.com Reviews

About Auto-Price-Finder.com

AutoPriceFinder, found online at Auto-Price-Finder.com, is a website that claims to help people find the biggest discounts available on new vehicles from dealers within your living area.

It is free to use Auto-Price-Finder.com, which says that their service will help you see which dealers are offering discount and clearance pricing, as well as which dealers may offer discounted pricing in the future.

The website also says that its goal is to help their customers with all their needs when researching the best prices on both new and used vehicles. To achieve this goal, they feature informational articles in addition to their search feature.

The articles currently included in their resources section include: Negotiation Tips, Buying vs Leasing, Financing Options, and New Cars vs Used Cars.

In order to use their search feature, you simply fill in the make and model of the desired car you wish to buy, whether or not you want a new or used vehicle, and the zip code where you are searching for a car.

But Auto-Price-Finder.com is open that their job is to give your information to vendors who match the requests. The vendors will then contact you, so you must be prepared to deal with phone calls or emails.

In addition, you will also receive newsletters, account updates, and emails from AutoPriceFinder and their affiliated websites.

If you decide you no longer wish to be contacted by these vendors, you must Unsubscribe from their service by going to their website and clicking the Unsubscribe option, or by choosing that option at the bottom of one their newsletters.

If you have any experience with this service, please leave your Auto-Price-Finder.com reviews below.

4 Auto-Price-Finder.com Reviews

Beware of Scam at Dollar car Rental LAX – Los Angeles Forum #usa #auto


#dollar auto rental
#

Beware of Scam at Dollar car Rental LAX

Wollongong

Mar 24, 2010, 9:24 PM

Just a warning about the Dollar Car rental Office LAX.

I hired a car through Auto Europe for 20 days in L.A. Auto Europe are a Car Rental Broker and I am happy with their service.

It was an all inclusive deal,which included all Taxes ,insurance and local charges.Great way to book as USA car rental are a scam waiting to happen.Used this system a few times with not a problem untill a few weeks ago.

They sent me my voucher and I got stuck with Dollar Rent a Car.

Well after a 14 hour flight from Australia,the mind is not too swiched on and I reckon the sales people know it!

I was asked if I wanted an upgrade for an Extra $5.00 a day.I said fine,but I wanted a certain car,sales person said,no problem,go and pick one.I got the keys to a nice Dodge Charger.

I was told as I had a voucher and was pre paid,that there were no other charges ,except the $5.00 a day upgrade,so sign ,here,here and here.

So when I arrive home,on my credit card were charges for an extra $500!

The $5 a day had increased to $12.Then there was a thing called Road Safe at $107.At no point was I asked about this.This charge was for flat a tire or if you had an accident or break down,they would tow away the car! What if you don t have this,they leave it on the side of the road forever?If a car breaksdown,it is their car and their fault,why should I be insured for that?

Next was an airport recovery charge,$41 what is this suppose to be?I took the car back to the rental office Depot,they never had to pick it up from the airport!

I can understand that you may have to pay extra for taxes on the extra charges,but when the fast talking salesman says,$5 a day,you would think, $5 a day.

When you pay for all insurance to be inclusive,why would you need Road safe?

When I complained,they said I signed and agreed to the costs,so I checked and so I did.That is what you get for not reading the small print.

So it comes down to no matter how tired you are,always read the fine print before you sign on the dotted line,don t trust the Sales Person,I reckon they must get a commission.

This was Dollar LAX,so beware.

They did refund me approx $130,but considering the suprise extra charges,left me feeling Riped Off!

Love to hear if any others have had this problem with Dollar at LAX or Dollar Rental as a whole?


Are Extended Car Warranties a Scam? #craigen #auto #parts


#auto warranty companies
#

Are Extended Car Warranties a Scam?

With reports of consumers submitting warranty claims that never pay out, and lawsuits and settlements related to warranty scams, it’s important to conduct plenty of research on auto warranty companies in order to avoid being duped when buying an extended auto warranty.

According to the vehicle manufacturers, dealers and independent providers we interviewed, every extended auto warranty comes with exclusions, and prices average from $1,500 to $2,000. Consumers should proceed with caution, especially if the solicitation came via the mail or phone.

“A number of these third-party (auto warranty companies) are fly-by-night operations that go belly up within a few years, costing consumers hundreds of dollars in out-of-pocket repairs and leaving them without coverage,” says Ron Montoya, senior consumer advice editor for Edmunds.com. “A third-party warranty is so named because it has no direct business relationship with the product it covers. In this case, your car.”

Buyer beware before purchasing a vehicle extended warranty

Do your research before buying a third-party auto service plan and be sure to read the fine print.

Dean Davis of Chandler, Arizona, says he was duped. After buying a pre-owned 2008 Honda Accord, he rolled the cost of a $2,000 extended warranty into his car loan. “I wanted to ensure the car would not have any major mechanical costs during the finance period,” he says.

However, six months later when the car’s air conditioner malfunctioned, Davis says it compounded into nearly $1,000 worth of damage. “Lo and behold, I was informed that the ‘tier’ of coverage I have doesn’t cover the failure.”

While Davis says he didn’t feel pressured into buying the extended warranty, he thought the warranty package covered everything mechanical and electrical on the car.

“I thought it covered basically everything except deliberate destruction or failure to maintain, such as changing the oil,” he says. “It lists a dizzying array of parts of the engine, transmission, axles, electrical and A/C components. But obviously not the $7 [A/C] relay that caused all my problems.”

Dan Keenoy, general manager of Don Massey Cadillac in Lone Tree, Colorado, said in 2012 that unscrupulous third-party companies prey upon unsuspecting consumers. “It’s buyer beware,” he said. “There are a lot of scams out there.”

Oftentimes, car owners receive phone calls or materials in the mail that appear to be from a legitimate source, namely the car’s manufacturer.

“They’ll say it doesn’t matter what the year, what the make, or what the model is. they’re going to cover it from this point on,” Keenoy added. “That’s absolute total baloney.”

Auto warranty scam leads to settlement

Beware of auto extended warranties with no affiliation with the manufacturer.

For Joyce Garner of Peoria, Arizona, a TV commercial promising extended warranty coverage for used vehicles convinced her to sign up and pay $99 a month for nearly a year to U.S. Fidelis, a company based near St. Louis.

“Every time I’d call them for a claim, they denied it,” she says. “They came up with one reason or another. I finally quit paying them. I’m elderly, I’m on disability and got nothing for paying all that money.”

In July 2012, following a two-year investigation of U.S. Fidelis numerous federal and state agencies, a federal bankruptcy judge in Missouri accepted a settlement in the case that places $14.1 million, garnered from liquidating the assets of owners Cory and Darain Atkinson, into a restitution fund to compensate eligible consumers who submit a valid proof of claim with the bankruptcy court.

Investigators say the men, who also did business as National Auto Warranty Services and Dealer Services, sold warranty packages to as many as 625,000 consumers in 29 states, plus the District of Columbia.

The settlement follows their guilty pleas earlier this year to one count each of federal felony charges of conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud, and filing false tax returns, according to the Missouri AG’s office.

The federal indictment says the pair deceived consumers by marketing and selling worthless vehicle service contracts with no affiliation to an automobile manufacturer, no authority to provide an automobile manufacturer’s factory warranty, and no authority to alter or extend a factory warranty.

In September 2012, Cory Atkinson was sentenced to four years for the state charges and 40 months for the federal charges, and Darain was sentenced to eight years for the state charges and eight years for the federal charges. Both men were ordered to serve their sentences concurrently in federal prison, as well as pay $4 million in restitution to the IRS for conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud and filing false tax returns. The men’s attorneys did not return calls seeking comment.

Also in 2011, the Federal Trade Commission reports it returned nearly $3.2 million to about 4,450 consumers who bought bogus auto warranties from now-defunct Transcontinental Warranty. The FTC alleges Transcontinental hired several telemarketers to blast consumers with illegal prerecorded calls that tricked them into buying vehicle service contracts under the guise that they were extensions of original vehicle warranties.

Settlements with the FTC ban the defendants from telemarketing and require them to pay restitution. In October 2011, the company’s president Christopher Cowart and vice president Cris Sagnelli were sentenced to a five-year prison sentence and a $15,000 fine after pleading guilty to federal fraud charges. Cowart was released in January 2015, Sagnelli in February 2014.

Research auto warranty companies

What most car owners don’t realize is the term “extended warranty” is actually a misnomer. A warranty is a guarantee from the manufacturer of a product to repair or replace it within a specific amount of time, and it’s included in the price. An extended warranty is really a “service contract,” because it’s sold separately for an additional amount of time and costs extra.

To avoid getting scammed, vehicle owners need to thoroughly research the auto warranty companies they’re considering for proper business registration and insurance coverage, says Jane Lanzillo, spokeswoman for the Service Contract Industry Council. A majority of providers purchase insurance from heavily regulated insurance companies to guarantee the performance of all of their service contracts, she says.

Currently, 37 states require specific registration, including proof of financial backing. Also, the FTC says many service contracts — regardless of who sells them — are handled by independent administrators, who act as claims adjusters, so it’s important to research both the seller and administrator.

Lanzillo cites the top three third-party administrators as Automobile Protection Corp. Advantage Warranty Corp. and Universal Underwriters Service Corp. After you’ve researched the company and looked for the best extended auto warranty, it’s important to understand exactly what’s included in the contract .

“Unfortunately, many consumers buy an extended service contract without taking the time to fully understand what the contract covers,” said National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence spokesman Tony Molla in 2012. “The best advice would be to read the contract carefully before you sign anything.”

“Read the policy. An informed consumer can’t be taken advantage of. – ASE spokesman Tony Molla


A warning – the fake loan offer scam #nigeria, #millions, #dollars, #crime, #internet, #fraud, #cheque, #scam, #laundering, #lagos, #con, #criminal, #loan, #interfraud, #


#

InterFraud
The Internet Fraud Advisory Group
A not for profit group based in Britain

The Fake Loan / Investment Scam (a 419 Advance Fee Fraud). Be warned, they promise millions but first you have to pay.

This page contains a sizeable list of the names and titles attached to some of the criminally motivated junk mail you may have received. Use your browser’s search facility (Ctrl+F) to find a name of interest on this page. Well done, you were right to be suspicious!!

This page: The fake loan offerfraud. see also Lottery winner fraud . Primer on Internet fraud .
Fraudsters haunting dating/matchmaking websites ,The fake job offer fraud, The Bank Accounts and Western Union addresses.

Recently we have seen an increase in reports of very dubious loan and investment offers. Don’t let criminals fool you into sending an advance fee for an imaginary loan. Examples of fake names and titles used in suspicious e-mails follow. Fraud criminals will often use the names of real companies in their junk mail. These companies are victims insofar as their reputations suffer at the hands of the scammers.

A contact familiar with the fake loan and investment scams has this advice: Over time, the marks are becoming less dumb and refuse to pay front fees for funding. The scammer then backs up and ‘arranges to have the fee paid by a third party’ so the mark can pay the fee from funds provided. What they seek is to pay with the equivalent of a ‘hot check’ and get the mark to pay the fee before the deposit bounces.

Scammer warning signs:

1. The scammer is willing to fund you without any apparent due diligence.

2. They use free and anonymous e-mail services – especially yahoo.com and gmail.com.

3. They pose as English investors, barristers and bankers but their English grammar is poor and spelling is sometimes ridiculous.

4. They insist on payment of a fee or expense before you are funded OR send you funds and demand that you immediately pay the required fee/ expense from the money you are sent (i.e. before the forged or stolen check is identified by your bank).

5. The criminals will usually ask for payment via Western Union.


2017 – We have received a warning about European Technology Holding, European Technology Trust and Fidelity Group, Dubai; owners and directors Eugen Plaksin and Waltraud Plaksin.

CAPITAL TRUST INTERNATIONAL FINANCE, Mount Street London.

John Weston / IFA Group, UK. Please, before forwarding suspicious mail, check that you have included FULL INTERNET HEADERS (see below). It is not always possible to respond to reports of fraud mail, but appropriate action is always taken.


Used-car lots manipulated for bank fraud scam by business operator, feds claim #cerritos #auto #square


#used auto
#

Used-car lots manipulated for bank fraud scam by business operator, feds claim

FLINT, MI — A Flint-area man is facing federal charges after authorities claimed he used local car dealerships to organize a bank fraud scheme.

Edward Frank Usewick III pleaded not guilty Nov. 19 in Flint U.S. District Court after he was arraigned on bank fraud and conspiracy charges following the unsealing of a 20-count federal indictment.

Usewick’s attorney, Steven Fishman, declined to comment on the allegations.

Federal prosecutors allege the scheme began in December 2011, when Usewick and an unidentified co-conspirator entered into an agreement with the owners of Suski Chevrolet-Buick in Birch Run to operate a string of used car dealerships around the Flint area using the Suski name.

Andy Suski, president of Suski Chevrolet-Buick, could not be reached immediately for comment on the case.

Suski announced in January 2014 that he was shutting down his five used car dealerships in the Flint area, citing management problems. Suski told The Flint Journal previously the Suski Used Car dealerships were being operated by five limited liability companies registered to Usewick’s wife, Cheyenne Usewick.

Cheyenne Usewick could not be reached for comment. She is not facing any criminal charges in connection to the alleged scheme. Her attorney, Frank J. Manley, said he is aware of the investigation.

Suski was the dealership license holder for the Suski Used Car lots, state officials previously told The Flint Journal. He and his business partner received a payment for each car sold at Suski Used Cars, according to the indictment.

Prosecutors allege Edward Usewick used the Suski Used Car dealerships to secure a revolving line of credit from Ally Financial, which was to be used for obtaining money to purchase vehicles for later re-sale. Court records show the financing typically involved lenders releasing additional funding to the dealerships once it received a title showing the dealership had purchased a vehicle.

Usewick allegedly began submitting vehicle titles to Ally Financial in September 2013 for cars he claimed to have purchased in exchange for money that was deposited into a bank account operated by Usewick, according to the indictment.

However, prosecutors claimed Usewick never actually purchased the vehicles and the titles contained fraudulent title numbers.

Prosecutors alleged Usewick submitted 19 fraudulent titles for vehicles between Sept. 26 and Dec. 3, 2013. The indictment does not identify how much money Ally Financial allegedly provided Usewick for the vehicles.

A Secretary of State spokesman previously told The Journal that Suski voluntarily surrendered the dealerships’ licenses and that an investigation was being launched into the dealerships after multiple consumer complaints.

The spokesman said in January 2014 the state decided to take action after receiving “a few complaints that dealt with title work.”

The Suski used car lots were located at 205 S. Dort Highway, Flint; 16555 Silver Parkway, Fenton; 7401 Clio Road, Mt. Morris; 1640 Lapeer Road, Lapeer; and 15133 North Holly Road, Holly.

Complaints were not filed against Suski’s dealership in Birch Run.

Suski and the Usewicks currently have lawsuits pending against each other in Genesee Circuit Court.

The indictment was not the first time Usewick was accused of being involved in a used car scam.

Usewick and three other people were charged with racketeering and various other crimes in 2010 after he allegedly acquired vehicles from a Massachusetts-based leasing company and sold them through a Flint car auction using duplicate titles.

Authorities alleged the leasing company that provided the vehicles to Usewick never was paid for the cars.

Usewick pleaded guilty in February 2011 to six misdemeanor counts of producing fraudulent titles for the commission of a crime. He was sentenced to two years of probation and ordered to pay restitution.

Court records show the case was eventually closed in September 2013 — just weeks prior to when the most-recent fraud accusations allegedly began — after Usewick satisfied the terms of his restitution order.

Usewick was released on a $50,000 unsecured bond. A jury trial is scheduled for Jan. 25.


Reviews – Legit or Scam? #das #auto


#auto price finder
#

Auto-Price-Finder.com Reviews

About Auto-Price-Finder.com

AutoPriceFinder, found online at Auto-Price-Finder.com, is a website that claims to help people find the biggest discounts available on new vehicles from dealers within your living area.

It is free to use Auto-Price-Finder.com, which says that their service will help you see which dealers are offering discount and clearance pricing, as well as which dealers may offer discounted pricing in the future.

The website also says that its goal is to help their customers with all their needs when researching the best prices on both new and used vehicles. To achieve this goal, they feature informational articles in addition to their search feature.

The articles currently included in their resources section include: Negotiation Tips, Buying vs Leasing, Financing Options, and New Cars vs Used Cars.

In order to use their search feature, you simply fill in the make and model of the desired car you wish to buy, whether or not you want a new or used vehicle, and the zip code where you are searching for a car.

But Auto-Price-Finder.com is open that their job is to give your information to vendors who match the requests. The vendors will then contact you, so you must be prepared to deal with phone calls or emails.

In addition, you will also receive newsletters, account updates, and emails from AutoPriceFinder and their affiliated websites.

If you decide you no longer wish to be contacted by these vendors, you must Unsubscribe from their service by going to their website and clicking the Unsubscribe option, or by choosing that option at the bottom of one their newsletters.

If you have any experience with this service, please leave your Auto-Price-Finder.com reviews below.

4 Auto-Price-Finder.com Reviews

Auto Credit Express Reviews – Legit or Scam? #used #cars #websites


#express credit auto
#

Auto Credit Express Reviews

About Auto Credit Express

Auto Credit Express is a website which was established in 1999 and describes themselves as the largest automotive special finance total solution firm offering people of all credit situations a connection with lenders and dealerships.

According to their website, they have the ability to connect even people with bad credit or no credit with a selection of over 1,200 authorized dealers and automotive lending partners.

The services of Auto Credit Express are available nationwide and be put toward new or used cars. They say they take great pride in assisting first time buyers and people who have a history with repossession or even bankruptcy.

Customers who are wondering how they personally might benefit from using Auto Credit Express can take a thirty second quiz to determine how they pre-qualify for a loan. All you need to do is tell them your credit score, your monthly income, and your monthly payments for rent or mortgage, credit cards, and more.

After you submit all this information, the website will then generate a generalized estimate of what loan amount you are likely to be approved for, and then you can choose to continue on with the application.

Customers who do decide to move forward with a formal application need to know that there will be a formal credit inquiry made, but credit inquiries only negatively affect your score when too many are processed at once.

After your official loan has been submitted, you will be given access to the loan terms, including interest rates. If you have any complaints regarding the interest rates or the repayment schedule, you are under no obligation to accept the loan.

To help you best assess whether or not the loan you are offered will work for you, Auto Credit Express provides you with an auto loan payment calculator so that you can understand whether or not the payments will be manageable for you.

If you have any experience with this company, please leave your Auto Credit Express reviews below.

0 Auto Credit Express Reviews

Used-car lots manipulated for bank fraud scam by business operator, feds claim #auto #led


#used auto
#

Used-car lots manipulated for bank fraud scam by business operator, feds claim

FLINT, MI — A Flint-area man is facing federal charges after authorities claimed he used local car dealerships to organize a bank fraud scheme.

Edward Frank Usewick III pleaded not guilty Nov. 19 in Flint U.S. District Court after he was arraigned on bank fraud and conspiracy charges following the unsealing of a 20-count federal indictment.

Usewick’s attorney, Steven Fishman, declined to comment on the allegations.

Federal prosecutors allege the scheme began in December 2011, when Usewick and an unidentified co-conspirator entered into an agreement with the owners of Suski Chevrolet-Buick in Birch Run to operate a string of used car dealerships around the Flint area using the Suski name.

Andy Suski, president of Suski Chevrolet-Buick, could not be reached immediately for comment on the case.

Suski announced in January 2014 that he was shutting down his five used car dealerships in the Flint area, citing management problems. Suski told The Flint Journal previously the Suski Used Car dealerships were being operated by five limited liability companies registered to Usewick’s wife, Cheyenne Usewick.

Cheyenne Usewick could not be reached for comment. She is not facing any criminal charges in connection to the alleged scheme. Her attorney, Frank J. Manley, said he is aware of the investigation.

Suski was the dealership license holder for the Suski Used Car lots, state officials previously told The Flint Journal. He and his business partner received a payment for each car sold at Suski Used Cars, according to the indictment.

Prosecutors allege Edward Usewick used the Suski Used Car dealerships to secure a revolving line of credit from Ally Financial, which was to be used for obtaining money to purchase vehicles for later re-sale. Court records show the financing typically involved lenders releasing additional funding to the dealerships once it received a title showing the dealership had purchased a vehicle.

Usewick allegedly began submitting vehicle titles to Ally Financial in September 2013 for cars he claimed to have purchased in exchange for money that was deposited into a bank account operated by Usewick, according to the indictment.

However, prosecutors claimed Usewick never actually purchased the vehicles and the titles contained fraudulent title numbers.

Prosecutors alleged Usewick submitted 19 fraudulent titles for vehicles between Sept. 26 and Dec. 3, 2013. The indictment does not identify how much money Ally Financial allegedly provided Usewick for the vehicles.

A Secretary of State spokesman previously told The Journal that Suski voluntarily surrendered the dealerships’ licenses and that an investigation was being launched into the dealerships after multiple consumer complaints.

The spokesman said in January 2014 the state decided to take action after receiving “a few complaints that dealt with title work.”

The Suski used car lots were located at 205 S. Dort Highway, Flint; 16555 Silver Parkway, Fenton; 7401 Clio Road, Mt. Morris; 1640 Lapeer Road, Lapeer; and 15133 North Holly Road, Holly.

Complaints were not filed against Suski’s dealership in Birch Run.

Suski and the Usewicks currently have lawsuits pending against each other in Genesee Circuit Court.

The indictment was not the first time Usewick was accused of being involved in a used car scam.

Usewick and three other people were charged with racketeering and various other crimes in 2010 after he allegedly acquired vehicles from a Massachusetts-based leasing company and sold them through a Flint car auction using duplicate titles.

Authorities alleged the leasing company that provided the vehicles to Usewick never was paid for the cars.

Usewick pleaded guilty in February 2011 to six misdemeanor counts of producing fraudulent titles for the commission of a crime. He was sentenced to two years of probation and ordered to pay restitution.

Court records show the case was eventually closed in September 2013 — just weeks prior to when the most-recent fraud accusations allegedly began — after Usewick satisfied the terms of his restitution order.

Usewick was released on a $50,000 unsecured bond. A jury trial is scheduled for Jan. 25.


Reviews – Legit or Scam? #car #auto


#auto price finder
#

Auto-Price-Finder.com Reviews

About Auto-Price-Finder.com

AutoPriceFinder, found online at Auto-Price-Finder.com, is a website that claims to help people find the biggest discounts available on new vehicles from dealers within your living area.

It is free to use Auto-Price-Finder.com, which says that their service will help you see which dealers are offering discount and clearance pricing, as well as which dealers may offer discounted pricing in the future.

The website also says that its goal is to help their customers with all their needs when researching the best prices on both new and used vehicles. To achieve this goal, they feature informational articles in addition to their search feature.

The articles currently included in their resources section include: Negotiation Tips, Buying vs Leasing, Financing Options, and New Cars vs Used Cars.

In order to use their search feature, you simply fill in the make and model of the desired car you wish to buy, whether or not you want a new or used vehicle, and the zip code where you are searching for a car.

But Auto-Price-Finder.com is open that their job is to give your information to vendors who match the requests. The vendors will then contact you, so you must be prepared to deal with phone calls or emails.

In addition, you will also receive newsletters, account updates, and emails from AutoPriceFinder and their affiliated websites.

If you decide you no longer wish to be contacted by these vendors, you must Unsubscribe from their service by going to their website and clicking the Unsubscribe option, or by choosing that option at the bottom of one their newsletters.

If you have any experience with this service, please leave your Auto-Price-Finder.com reviews below.

4 Auto-Price-Finder.com Reviews