Edmonds Community College: Occupational Safety and Health #safety #degree #programs #online


#

Workplace Safety

Occupational health and safety professionals are needed in every business and industry. These specialists work with management teams to design safety programs and training.

They are responsible for the compliance with state and federal regulations regarding workplace safety. They collect data on safety and health conditions, monitor and measure hazards, and make recommendations that help prevent harm to workers, property, the environment, and the general public.

Are You Looking for a Safe Career?

Every business has unique safety issues. Whether you are considering a job in aviation, constructions, manufacturing, transportation, retail, food service, healthcare, human resources, business management or any other field – safety training is a must! The Occupational Safety and Health Program was designed through a unique collaboration between Edmonds Community College and Pierce College in response to industry demand for professionals in the field of Occupational Safety and Health.

Currently we offer two degree options:

  • Associate in Applied Science-T
  • Certificate in Construction Safety This certificate can be completed in approximately one year and is perfect for anyone interested in a job in the construction industry. It is also an excellent supplement to a variety of degree tracks.

Why Occupational Safety and Health?

Occupational Safety and Health professionals make a difference in the world every day! We train you to keep workers safe and healthy so they return home to their family and community safe and sound. In our programs, you will learn to:

PREVENT – Accidents, Injury and Disease

PROTECT – People and the Environment

RESPOND – to Incidents Concerns

INVESTIGATE – Accidents and Events

EVALUATE – Work Sites and Equipment

COMPLY – with State and Federal Regulations

DESIGN – Safety Plans, Policies and Procedures

MANAGE – Risks and Hazards

TRAIN – Workers to be SAFE

Who are the Classes Designed for? Online Classes Available!

We developed ten core OSH courses. All ten courses can be taken online.* We also have two special topics course that will offer a variety of specific instruction in areas such as Transportation Safety, Workplace Violence, Medical Surveilance, Pandemic Flu, and Safety in Agriculture. The OSH courses can be taken to supplement many different degree tracks or as professional development opportunities.

The U.S. Department of Labor expects a 9% to 17% job growth through 2014 for occupational safety and health technicians. Occupational Safety and Health as a profession is a great move for people currently employed but seeking advancement in their career. There is also a need for beginning professionals to fill a variety of jobs in this field. Many current safety professionals are preparing to retire which will create even more job opportunities in the near future.

* Some courses may require a one time, face to face exam for certification purposes. Alternative accommodations can be arranged with the instructor.

Resources for Student Success

Car Safety Comparison Ratings – Consumer Reports #goodyear #auto #service


#compare autos
#

Several different elements affect a vehicle’s overall safety capability

Crash tests. Frontal- and side- and rear impact crash tests are conducted by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. You’ll find crash-test ratings for all tested models on their Web sites.

You’ll also find crash-test results going back 10 years in the used car vehicle profiles. NHTSA revised its testing standards for the 2011 model year. This means that test results from prior years can’t be compared with results from 2011 forward. You can see the NHTSA and IIHS ratings on our vehicle profile pages .

Accident avoidance. A vehicle’s ability to help you avoid an accident is just as important as its ability to protect you in a crash. For every accident there are numerous near misses that statistics don’t reflect. Several factors contribute to a vehicle’s accident-avoidance capability, with the two most important being braking and emergency handling. Using our test data, Consumer Reports provides an accident-avoidance Rating on all tested vehicles.

Rollover resistance. Rollover accidents account for about 33 percent of all vehicle-occupant deaths and are of particular concern with SUVs and pickups. To help consumers compare vehicles, NHTSA provides a five-star rating system called the Rollover Resistance Rating (RRR). The RRR is based on two factors: a vehicle’s static stability factor (SSF) and a dynamic rollover test. The SSF, determined from static measurements of the vehicle, essentially indicates how top-heavy it is. The dynamic test simulates a driver having to make a series of sharp steering maneuvers, as can happen in an emergency. Vehicles that tip up fail the test, but it only downgrades the overall star rating slightly.

We think a vehicle that tips up in this type of situation has serious stability problems, and we will not recommend it. RRR ratings are available at www.safercar.gov . Click on the model’s name or star ratings to get more information, and scroll down to “Rollover.” Note that prior to 2004 models, NHTSA used only the SSF to determine rollover ratings, so there are no dynamic test results.

Rear-impact protection. Although rear enders have a low fatality rate they have a high injury rate, especially for whiplash neck injuries. The design of a car’s head restraints and seats are critical factors in how severe a whiplash injury will be. CR evaluates head restraints for all seating positions in every tested vehicle. Any problems are noted in our road-test reports.

Another good source for information on rear-impact protection is the IIHS website. The institute conducts evaluations of head restraints and performs dynamic rear-impact tests that measure how well the seat/head-restraint combinations in different models protect against whiplash.

Blind zones. Every year, children are injured and killed because drivers don’t see them while backing up. A contributing factor is that some larger vehicles, such as SUVs and pickups, have larger blind zones—the area behind a vehicle that the driver can’t see. See our report on the dangers of blind spots .

To check a vehicle’s blind spot yourself, sit in the driver’s seat of the parked vehicle while someone stands in back and holds out a hand at about waist level. Have the person walk back slowly until you can see the hand through the rear window. This will give you an idea of how big that vehicle’s blind spot is.

Power-window switches. Some vehicles have rocker- or toggle-type power-window switches that will raise the window when they are pressed down or forward. This is a very risky design because a child who is leaning out of an open window can accidentally kneel on the switch and close the window, possibly causing injury or death. A better design is a lever switch, which raises the window only when it’s pulled upward.

See our cars Safety section for more information.


2017 Toyota Tacoma vs #2017 #toyota #tacoma, #2017 #toyota #tundra, #compare, #vs., #review, #msrp, #invoice, #rebate, #incentive, #lease, #cash #back, #finance, #cost, #warranty, #mpg, #fuel #economy, #engine, #seating, #seats, #city, #highway, #car #photos, #safety, #crash #test, #safety #ratings


#

2017 Toyota Tacoma vs. 2017 Toyota Tundra Review

Comparison Review

Comfort
Due to its greater head- and legroom, passengers in the extended cab will be able to stretch out a lot more in the Toyota Tundra than in the Toyota Tacoma. As far as headroom and legroom go, there’s not much difference between the Toyota Tacoma and the Toyota Tundra.

Convenience
You’ll be making about the same number of stops at the gas station with the Toyota Tacoma as you will with the Toyota Tundra, as they can travel a similar number of miles on a tank of gas.

Cost
There are a lot of factors to consider when calculating the overall cost of a vehicle. The main consideration is Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP). Clearly, the Toyota Tacoma is a better financial choice over the Toyota Tundra, when considering MSRP. Another consideration is the Destination Charge, which is a standard charge for transporting the vehicle to the dealer from where it’s built. The Toyota Tacoma carries a much lower Destination Charge than the Toyota Tundra.

Dimensions
Since the Toyota Tacoma is much slimmer than the Toyota Tundra, it’ll be much easier to find a wide enough space in a crowded parking lot. If you go with the Toyota Tacoma, you’ll have a much easier time finding a large enough space to park than you will with the Toyota Tundra.

Drivetrain
With its lower torque engine, the Toyota Tacoma doesn’t do as good a job transmitting horsepower to its wheels as the Toyota Tundra.

Handling
The Toyota Tacoma has a smaller turning radius than the Toyota Tundra, allowing you to more easily get in and out of tight spots.

Performance
If you’ve got something you need to tow, the Toyota Tacoma will do just as well as the Toyota Tundra, since they have about the same towing capacity. The Toyota Tacoma has a little less horsepower than the Toyota Tundra.

Utility
The Toyota Tacoma has less seating than the Toyota Tundra, making the Toyota Tundra the better choice if you often have passengers.

Warranty
The Toyota Tacoma comes with essentially the same basic warranty as the Toyota Tundra.

Compare the 2017 Toyota Tacoma and the 2017 Toyota Tundra.

Become a NewCars.com Dealer Partner today.

Helpful Links

Certain specifications, prices and equipment data have been provided under license from Chrome Data Solutions (“Chrome Data”). 2017 Chrome Data Solutions, LP. All Rights Reserved. This information is supplied for personal use only and may not be used for any commercial purpose whatsoever without the express written consent of Chrome Data. Chrome Data makes no guarantee or warranty, either expressed or implied, including without limitation any warranty of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose, with respect to the data presented here. All specifications, prices and equipment are subject to change without notice.

Uh oh! This site will not function properly if you have JavaScript turned off.

To save money on your next car purchase, please follow the instructions below to turn JavaScript on.

  1. Firefox
    Click on the Tools Options Content tab. Check the Enable Javascript box. Click OK. Refresh your browser.
  2. Internet Explorer
    Click on Tools Internet Options Security tab. Click Internet then click the Custom Level button. Scroll down to Active Scripting, then click the radio button for Enable. Click OK, OK. Refresh your browser.
  3. Chrome
    Click the Chrome menu on the browser toolbar. Then select Settings. Click “Show advanced settings”. In the “Privacy” section, click the “Content settings” button. Click on the option to “Allow all sites to run JavaScript (recommended)”. Then click “Done”. Refresh your browser.
  4. Safari
    Click on the Safari (OS X) or Edit (Windows) Menu Preferences Security Tab. Check the Enable Javascript box. Close the Preferences window. Refresh your browser.

Electrician Plano #plano #electrician, #electrical #repairs, #electrical #service, #ceiling #fans, #light #fixtures, #electrical #wiring, #safety #outlets, #home #lighting, #electrical #panels, #commercial #electrical, #home #generators, #surge #protection, #electrical #contractor #tx, #electricians, #light #repair #


#

Your Licensed Electricians In Plano & Surrounding Cities

At Adis Electric. we are about more than just quality Plano electrician services, we are about providing solutions. This starts by working with you to find out more about your wants, needs and what you hope to achieve. Then we will help to educate and inform you about the options that you have so that you make the best choice possible. This approach is what has helped us become the number one local choice for both residential and commercial services. Now, we look forward to working with you to professionally address any and all of your service needs.

Professional Electricians Serving Residential and Commercial Clients in Plano the Surrounding Cities

Light Fixtures

Light fixtures are the cornerstone of helping illuminate any house or business, including creating just the right look and feel. Lighting is a key factor in the ambiance you have, or what you lack if you do not plan well for lighting options. The most important thing is making sure that these fixtures are securely in place and that the installation is handled with the skill and precision required for optimal results. Otherwise, you could end up with lights that don’t work correctly and, even worse, that lead to electrical problems behind the walls.

Qualified Electrical Inspections

The best way to truly know what is going on behind your walls is by letting Adis Electric address your need for a qualified electrical inspection. Even if your home is not that old, it is important to make sure that you have the quality wiring in place that you had hoped for. This is also the ideal time to make sure that your older house isn’t harboring any secrets that went undetected in the initial home inspection, such as aluminum wiring or knob and tube wiring. The bottom line is that we want to help make sure that you have a safe and secure place to call home, for you and your loved ones.

Circuit Breaker Replacement Services

Often times, we find that older panel boxes are not equipped to meet the high demand for electricity that all of today’s modern gadgets place on it. The good news is that this can easily be addressed simply by letting our experts take care of your need for replacement. Let us help you update and upgrade this aspect of your home, so that you and your family can still enjoy every one of today’s electrical modern amenities. The best part is that you can enjoy them all but without the inconvenience of blowing fuses, tripping breakers or putting your home at risk of electrical fires.

A Focus On Electrical Safety

Part of updating and upgrading is finding ways that you can make changes in order to see savings on your monthly utility bills, but it is about so much more than that. We want to be able to help you get the safety care that you need so that you and your family members are not subjected to shocks, burns or more serious hazards – such as electrocution. This is especially important for any households with younger children but should be addressed for each home, no matter what. Get in touch with us today and let us help you get the essential service that you want, need and deserve.

Why You Should Choose Us For Your Plano Area Electrical Needs

We take this line of work seriously and it shows in the results that we get. Give us a call right now in order to address your need for expertise when it comes to your Plano electrician services. We look forward to working with you and showing you how we have built the reputation that we have for ourselves.

Experienced Electricians With A Smile

Recent Articles

The Benefits Of Aluminum Wiring Replacement

The truth of the matter is, there are some great things about owning an older Plano home. One of the main things is that older styles offer a unique charm that newer homes just simply cannot replicate. Of course buying

How To Know If Your Plano Home Needs a Panel Upgrade

Buying an older home is a wise investment, as long as you’re aware of some of the unique challenges that you may be facing. One of these issues that you will probably need to deal with is the need for a panel upgrade.

If you are looking for a Plano Electrician then please call 214-613-1000 or complete our online request form .


Safety and Fraud Awareness – Adviser: Car Advice on How to Sell a Car #walmart #auto #batteries


#auto tader
#

Safety and Fraud Awareness

At AutoTrader.com, we want to do everything we can to help you sell your car quickly and easily. A big part of that objective is preventing fraud and looking out for your safety as you move through the process.

To that end, we’ve compiled some general guidelines that can help you prepare and safeguard your interests when advertising and selling a car.

Tips for Personal Safety

  • Get information about the prospective buyer. including full name, street address, phone number, driver’s license number and insurance information. When you initially communicate with the potential buyer. mention that you’ll need these documents before the test drive.
  • Scout out a logical route for the test drive in advance. Choose streets that don’t have a lot of traffic, but don’t venture into secluded areas .
  • It’s best to meet in a public place. like the parking lot of a shopping center. And keep your cell phone with you.
  • Decide whether you’re more comfortable going with your buyer on the test drive or staying behind. This is a judgment call on your part, made more easily if you have someone with you.
  • If at all possible, bring a friend or family member along. And make sure someone knows where you’re going, the route you expect to take and when you expect to return.
  • If you let the potential buyer take your car by himself, ask him to leave his keys while you wait, and be very specific about the maximum length of time you expect him to be gone.

Tips for Avoiding Scams

  • Secure payment before you transfer ownership and work only with the specific person who is purchasing your car (versus someone acting on his behalf). If you accept a check, be sure to verify it with the issuing bank — not your bank. (The easiest way to avoid problems is to go to the buyer’s bank and complete the final transaction there.)
  • Be wary of anyone who makes an offer to buy your car sight-unseen. especially buyers located overseas. This is often part of a larger scam to pass a bad check or to get the title of the car without paying for it. Always verify the buyer’s street address and phone number.
    • An escrow service — a third party that holds the title to your car until you are absolutely certain your payment is secure — can be a good option, but only if you use a reputable bank or attorney, or a well-known, established online service. Never agree to an escrow service  that the prospective buyer suggests unless you have thoroughly researched it — the Better Business Bureau is a good place to start.
    • In an overpayment scam. the potential buyer typically tells you that someone else owes him an amount that is higher than your selling price and he wants that person to pay you instead. He then asks you to give him the car, plus the difference in price. (Sometimes the prospective buyer will offer you additional money as compensation.) Regardless of how legitimate they seem, these situations are almost always scams to get you to part with your car and additional money.
    • A prospective buyer who wants to work out a payment plan for your car is likely up to no good. AutoTrader.com strongly advises against agreeing to a payment plan, regardless of the terms. In these scenarios, the buyer typically gets you to agree to a payment plan, frequently with substantial interest, only to leave you with an initial payment (which may or may not be fraudulent) and disappear with your car.

    Where to Report Fraud

    In addition, if you are a victim of fraud, you should file a complaint with the Internet Crime Complaint Center. or IC3. IC3 focuses solely on cyber crimes and is a partnership between the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the National White Collar Crime Center and the Bureau of Justice assistance.

    Finally, contact your local law enforcement. If there was any interaction with a scammer posing as a prospective buyer within their jurisdiction, they should take a report, plus it will help their fraud department identify trends for scams in your area.

    Facts about AutoTrader.com

    We don’t own, buy or sell vehicles listed on our site.

    AutoTrader.com is an online vehicle listing service that connects car buyers with sellers. We are not car dealers. Any listing information about a particular car comes directly from the seller, not us.

    If you receive an email that implies AutoTrader.com is selling or buying a vehicle, please report it to us and to local law enforcement. It’s a scam.

    We don’t offer automotive warehousing or shipping services.

    Any email that requests a deposit or payment for shipment of a car “stored in an AutoTrader.com warehouse” is a scam. AutoTrader.com doesn’t own a warehouse, and we don’t ship cars. Simply put, we don’t get involved in transactions between buyers and sellers (see more below).

    There are many reputable warehousing and shipping services that can make long-distance transactions easy. Just be sure to check out the proposed services for yourself .

    If a seller recommends a bogus warehousing or shipping service, report the seller to us and to local law enforcement.

    We don’t get involved in transactions between buyers and sellers.

    Don’t respond to any email that appears to come from AutoTrader.com (for example, by displaying our logo) and urges you to complete the sale or purchase of a car listed on our site. Such emails are scams.

    Other signs of fraud are emails that:

    • Claim the security of a transaction is guaranteed by AutoTrader.com.
    • Imply we’ve verified information about a particular buyer, seller or listing.
    • Describe a “preferred” or “pre-approved” buyer or seller program.

    AutoTrader.com doesn’t guarantee or endorse transactions. and we don’t have preferred or pre-approved buyers or sellers. We’ll never encourage you to buy any particular vehicle listed on AutoTrader.com or to sell your vehicle to any particular buyer. If you receive a suspicious email such as the ones described above, report it to us and to local law enforcement.

    We don’t ask you for personal or financial information via email.

    Online fraud often begins with a spoof email requesting financial information. These spoof, or scam, emails often impersonate a reputable company such as AutoTrader.com by illegally displaying a company’s name, logo or trademark.

    The intent is to deceive customers into revealing information such as:

    • Username
    • Password
    • Social security number
    • Bank account number
    • Bank routing number
    • Credit card number

    The only time we’ll ever request your credit card information is when you’re in the process of purchasing an ad on our website. We will not take down your listing because you don’t provide account information. If you receive an email that asks for the kinds of information listed above, don’t respond. Instead, report the email to us and to local law enforcement.

    Internet Fraud Resources

    Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3)

    Better Business Bureau (BBB)

    Federal Trade Commission (FTC)


    Safety group lists best used cars for teen drivers – LA Times #auto #accessories


    #best used cars
    #

    Safety group lists best used cars for teen drivers

    What are the best used cars for teen drivers?

    Many teens are driving cars that are poorly matched to their driving skills, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

    The institute released its first list of recommended used vehicles for teens Wednesday after finding in a survey of 500 parents that 83% bought a used, rather than new, car for their teen to drive.

    The organization reviewed crash ratings and safety features such as electronic stability control systems for used cars and then obtained price data from Kelley Blue Book to build its list.

    Mindful that families can have varying budgets, the group recommended cars along a broad spectrum of prices. It recommended, for instance, the Lincoln MKS from the 2009 model year, which starts at about $15,500, but also 2006 to ’08 Volkswagen Passats, which start at about $5,000 on the used market.

    These lists of recommended used vehicles can help consumers factor in safety in addition to affordability, said Adrian Lund, the group’s president.

    The institute found that teens tend to drive small or subcompact cars that don’t offer good crash protection and also older cars, from the 2006 model year or earlier. That’s a problem because older vehicles are less likely to have important safety features such as electronic stability control and side air bags.

    Full list: Insurance Institute’s recommended used cars for teens

    Jerry Hirsch

    trb_nav_signinLine a a.trb_nav_:hover, a.trb_nav_:focus .trb_nav_submenulink a.trb_nav_submenulink:hover, a.trb_nav_submenulink:focus .trb_bylines_name_author a:hover

    Teenagers killed in crashes are more likely than adults to have been behind the wheel of small and older vehicles, the institute said. Among fatally injured drivers ages 15 to 17 from 2008 through 2012, 29% were in small or subcompact cars. That compared with 20% for drivers ages 35 to 50.

    Select bigger cars that have the mass to protect occupants in an accident.

    Put young drivers in vehicles equipped with electronic stability control, which helps a driver maintain control of the vehicle on curves and slippery roads. Such systems are as important as seat belts, the insurance group said.

    You don’t want to get your kid the spiffy red BMW that will be tempting to race. – Rosemary Shahan, president of Consumers for Auto Reliability and Safety

    Parents should also pick vehicles with good Insurance Institute for Highway Safety and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration safety ratings.

    You don’t want to get your kid the spiffy red BMW that will be tempting to race, said Rosemary Shahan, president of Consumers for Auto Reliability and Safety.

    Parents purchasing a used car for their teen should also check to see if the vehicle has been recalled but not fixed, Shahan said.

    There are something like 36 million cars out there that have a pending recall, Shahan said.

    The insurance group found that, on average, parents spend about $9,800 on a car for a teen. But the median point of car purchases for teens is far lower, at just $5,300.

    Unfortunately, it’s very difficult to get a safe vehicle for a teenager at the prices most people are paying, said Anne McCartt, Insurance Institute for Highway Safety senior vice president for research. Our advice to parents would be to remember the risks teens take and consider paying a little more.

    All the cars on the group’s list have electronic stability control and provide good crash protection.

    The group’s best choices for less than $20,000 also have good ratings for side crash protection, good head restraints and seats for rear crash protection, and good roof strength to protect occupants in rollover crashes.

    Vehicles considered good choices for less than $10,000 have good or acceptable side crash protection and head restraints rated better than poor.


    Safety group lists best used cars for teen drivers – LA Times #auto #care


    #best used cars
    #

    Safety group lists best used cars for teen drivers

    What are the best used cars for teen drivers?

    Many teens are driving cars that are poorly matched to their driving skills, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

    The institute released its first list of recommended used vehicles for teens Wednesday after finding in a survey of 500 parents that 83% bought a used, rather than new, car for their teen to drive.

    The organization reviewed crash ratings and safety features such as electronic stability control systems for used cars and then obtained price data from Kelley Blue Book to build its list.

    Mindful that families can have varying budgets, the group recommended cars along a broad spectrum of prices. It recommended, for instance, the Lincoln MKS from the 2009 model year, which starts at about $15,500, but also 2006 to ’08 Volkswagen Passats, which start at about $5,000 on the used market.

    These lists of recommended used vehicles can help consumers factor in safety in addition to affordability, said Adrian Lund, the group’s president.

    The institute found that teens tend to drive small or subcompact cars that don’t offer good crash protection and also older cars, from the 2006 model year or earlier. That’s a problem because older vehicles are less likely to have important safety features such as electronic stability control and side air bags.

    Full list: Insurance Institute’s recommended used cars for teens

    Jerry Hirsch

    trb_nav_signinLine a a.trb_nav_:hover, a.trb_nav_:focus .trb_nav_submenulink a.trb_nav_submenulink:hover, a.trb_nav_submenulink:focus .trb_bylines_name_author a:hover

    Teenagers killed in crashes are more likely than adults to have been behind the wheel of small and older vehicles, the institute said. Among fatally injured drivers ages 15 to 17 from 2008 through 2012, 29% were in small or subcompact cars. That compared with 20% for drivers ages 35 to 50.

    Select bigger cars that have the mass to protect occupants in an accident.

    Put young drivers in vehicles equipped with electronic stability control, which helps a driver maintain control of the vehicle on curves and slippery roads. Such systems are as important as seat belts, the insurance group said.

    You don’t want to get your kid the spiffy red BMW that will be tempting to race. – Rosemary Shahan, president of Consumers for Auto Reliability and Safety

    Parents should also pick vehicles with good Insurance Institute for Highway Safety and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration safety ratings.

    You don’t want to get your kid the spiffy red BMW that will be tempting to race, said Rosemary Shahan, president of Consumers for Auto Reliability and Safety.

    Parents purchasing a used car for their teen should also check to see if the vehicle has been recalled but not fixed, Shahan said.

    There are something like 36 million cars out there that have a pending recall, Shahan said.

    The insurance group found that, on average, parents spend about $9,800 on a car for a teen. But the median point of car purchases for teens is far lower, at just $5,300.

    Unfortunately, it’s very difficult to get a safe vehicle for a teenager at the prices most people are paying, said Anne McCartt, Insurance Institute for Highway Safety senior vice president for research. Our advice to parents would be to remember the risks teens take and consider paying a little more.

    All the cars on the group’s list have electronic stability control and provide good crash protection.

    The group’s best choices for less than $20,000 also have good ratings for side crash protection, good head restraints and seats for rear crash protection, and good roof strength to protect occupants in rollover crashes.

    Vehicles considered good choices for less than $10,000 have good or acceptable side crash protection and head restraints rated better than poor.


    Safety and Fraud Awareness – Adviser: Car Advice on How to Sell a Car #auto #loans #with #bad #credit


    #auto tader
    #

    Safety and Fraud Awareness

    At AutoTrader.com, we want to do everything we can to help you sell your car quickly and easily. A big part of that objective is preventing fraud and looking out for your safety as you move through the process.

    To that end, we’ve compiled some general guidelines that can help you prepare and safeguard your interests when advertising and selling a car.

    Tips for Personal Safety

    • Get information about the prospective buyer. including full name, street address, phone number, driver’s license number and insurance information. When you initially communicate with the potential buyer. mention that you’ll need these documents before the test drive.
    • Scout out a logical route for the test drive in advance. Choose streets that don’t have a lot of traffic, but don’t venture into secluded areas .
    • It’s best to meet in a public place. like the parking lot of a shopping center. And keep your cell phone with you.
    • Decide whether you’re more comfortable going with your buyer on the test drive or staying behind. This is a judgment call on your part, made more easily if you have someone with you.
    • If at all possible, bring a friend or family member along. And make sure someone knows where you’re going, the route you expect to take and when you expect to return.
    • If you let the potential buyer take your car by himself, ask him to leave his keys while you wait, and be very specific about the maximum length of time you expect him to be gone.

    Tips for Avoiding Scams

    • Secure payment before you transfer ownership and work only with the specific person who is purchasing your car (versus someone acting on his behalf). If you accept a check, be sure to verify it with the issuing bank — not your bank. (The easiest way to avoid problems is to go to the buyer’s bank and complete the final transaction there.)
  • Be wary of anyone who makes an offer to buy your car sight-unseen. especially buyers located overseas. This is often part of a larger scam to pass a bad check or to get the title of the car without paying for it. Always verify the buyer’s street address and phone number.
    • An escrow service — a third party that holds the title to your car until you are absolutely certain your payment is secure — can be a good option, but only if you use a reputable bank or attorney, or a well-known, established online service. Never agree to an escrow service  that the prospective buyer suggests unless you have thoroughly researched it — the Better Business Bureau is a good place to start.
    • In an overpayment scam. the potential buyer typically tells you that someone else owes him an amount that is higher than your selling price and he wants that person to pay you instead. He then asks you to give him the car, plus the difference in price. (Sometimes the prospective buyer will offer you additional money as compensation.) Regardless of how legitimate they seem, these situations are almost always scams to get you to part with your car and additional money.
    • A prospective buyer who wants to work out a payment plan for your car is likely up to no good. AutoTrader.com strongly advises against agreeing to a payment plan, regardless of the terms. In these scenarios, the buyer typically gets you to agree to a payment plan, frequently with substantial interest, only to leave you with an initial payment (which may or may not be fraudulent) and disappear with your car.

    Where to Report Fraud

    In addition, if you are a victim of fraud, you should file a complaint with the Internet Crime Complaint Center. or IC3. IC3 focuses solely on cyber crimes and is a partnership between the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the National White Collar Crime Center and the Bureau of Justice assistance.

    Finally, contact your local law enforcement. If there was any interaction with a scammer posing as a prospective buyer within their jurisdiction, they should take a report, plus it will help their fraud department identify trends for scams in your area.

    Facts about AutoTrader.com

    We don’t own, buy or sell vehicles listed on our site.

    AutoTrader.com is an online vehicle listing service that connects car buyers with sellers. We are not car dealers. Any listing information about a particular car comes directly from the seller, not us.

    If you receive an email that implies AutoTrader.com is selling or buying a vehicle, please report it to us and to local law enforcement. It’s a scam.

    We don’t offer automotive warehousing or shipping services.

    Any email that requests a deposit or payment for shipment of a car “stored in an AutoTrader.com warehouse” is a scam. AutoTrader.com doesn’t own a warehouse, and we don’t ship cars. Simply put, we don’t get involved in transactions between buyers and sellers (see more below).

    There are many reputable warehousing and shipping services that can make long-distance transactions easy. Just be sure to check out the proposed services for yourself .

    If a seller recommends a bogus warehousing or shipping service, report the seller to us and to local law enforcement.

    We don’t get involved in transactions between buyers and sellers.

    Don’t respond to any email that appears to come from AutoTrader.com (for example, by displaying our logo) and urges you to complete the sale or purchase of a car listed on our site. Such emails are scams.

    Other signs of fraud are emails that:

    • Claim the security of a transaction is guaranteed by AutoTrader.com.
    • Imply we’ve verified information about a particular buyer, seller or listing.
    • Describe a “preferred” or “pre-approved” buyer or seller program.

    AutoTrader.com doesn’t guarantee or endorse transactions. and we don’t have preferred or pre-approved buyers or sellers. We’ll never encourage you to buy any particular vehicle listed on AutoTrader.com or to sell your vehicle to any particular buyer. If you receive a suspicious email such as the ones described above, report it to us and to local law enforcement.

    We don’t ask you for personal or financial information via email.

    Online fraud often begins with a spoof email requesting financial information. These spoof, or scam, emails often impersonate a reputable company such as AutoTrader.com by illegally displaying a company’s name, logo or trademark.

    The intent is to deceive customers into revealing information such as:

    • Username
    • Password
    • Social security number
    • Bank account number
    • Bank routing number
    • Credit card number

    The only time we’ll ever request your credit card information is when you’re in the process of purchasing an ad on our website. We will not take down your listing because you don’t provide account information. If you receive an email that asks for the kinds of information listed above, don’t respond. Instead, report the email to us and to local law enforcement.

    Internet Fraud Resources

    Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3)

    Better Business Bureau (BBB)

    Federal Trade Commission (FTC)


    Car Safety Comparison Ratings – Consumer Reports #car #search #engine


    #compare autos
    #

    Several different elements affect a vehicle’s overall safety capability

    Crash tests. Frontal- and side- and rear impact crash tests are conducted by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. You’ll find crash-test ratings for all tested models on their Web sites.

    You’ll also find crash-test results going back 10 years in the used car vehicle profiles. NHTSA revised its testing standards for the 2011 model year. This means that test results from prior years can’t be compared with results from 2011 forward. You can see the NHTSA and IIHS ratings on our vehicle profile pages .

    Accident avoidance. A vehicle’s ability to help you avoid an accident is just as important as its ability to protect you in a crash. For every accident there are numerous near misses that statistics don’t reflect. Several factors contribute to a vehicle’s accident-avoidance capability, with the two most important being braking and emergency handling. Using our test data, Consumer Reports provides an accident-avoidance Rating on all tested vehicles.

    Rollover resistance. Rollover accidents account for about 33 percent of all vehicle-occupant deaths and are of particular concern with SUVs and pickups. To help consumers compare vehicles, NHTSA provides a five-star rating system called the Rollover Resistance Rating (RRR). The RRR is based on two factors: a vehicle’s static stability factor (SSF) and a dynamic rollover test. The SSF, determined from static measurements of the vehicle, essentially indicates how top-heavy it is. The dynamic test simulates a driver having to make a series of sharp steering maneuvers, as can happen in an emergency. Vehicles that tip up fail the test, but it only downgrades the overall star rating slightly.

    We think a vehicle that tips up in this type of situation has serious stability problems, and we will not recommend it. RRR ratings are available at www.safercar.gov . Click on the model’s name or star ratings to get more information, and scroll down to “Rollover.” Note that prior to 2004 models, NHTSA used only the SSF to determine rollover ratings, so there are no dynamic test results.

    Rear-impact protection. Although rear enders have a low fatality rate they have a high injury rate, especially for whiplash neck injuries. The design of a car’s head restraints and seats are critical factors in how severe a whiplash injury will be. CR evaluates head restraints for all seating positions in every tested vehicle. Any problems are noted in our road-test reports.

    Another good source for information on rear-impact protection is the IIHS website. The institute conducts evaluations of head restraints and performs dynamic rear-impact tests that measure how well the seat/head-restraint combinations in different models protect against whiplash.

    Blind zones. Every year, children are injured and killed because drivers don’t see them while backing up. A contributing factor is that some larger vehicles, such as SUVs and pickups, have larger blind zones—the area behind a vehicle that the driver can’t see. See our report on the dangers of blind spots .

    To check a vehicle’s blind spot yourself, sit in the driver’s seat of the parked vehicle while someone stands in back and holds out a hand at about waist level. Have the person walk back slowly until you can see the hand through the rear window. This will give you an idea of how big that vehicle’s blind spot is.

    Power-window switches. Some vehicles have rocker- or toggle-type power-window switches that will raise the window when they are pressed down or forward. This is a very risky design because a child who is leaning out of an open window can accidentally kneel on the switch and close the window, possibly causing injury or death. A better design is a lever switch, which raises the window only when it’s pulled upward.

    See our cars Safety section for more information.


    UNIFUN – Mini 3000mAh Auto Car Safety Hammer Emergency Escape Tool w #auto #amortization #schedule


    #auto car
    #

    Description

    5 in 1 Auto Safety Emergency Escape Tool(Also can charger your phones or tablet)

    Power bank functions:

    It has built-in 3000mAh li-ion battery and Micro USB (5V/1A) for charging your device up to 1000 charge-discharge cycles. Compatible with camcorders, cameras, tablet, PSP, Samsung Galaxy S3 S4 S5 and other Android devices. If charge for iPhone,iPad,iPod, power adapter is required.

    Emergency Rescue Hammer:

    It is designed as an aid in the event of an emergency. Whether the emergency is due to submersion in water, a fire or a related event, this lifesaving device is easily stored out of the way.

    Strong LED /SOS warning flashlight:

    With 3 options of its light intensity, which can be used as SOS signals to seek help in any emergency. Also get attention or help fast and ward off danger. Feel Safe and Secure.

    Mini but Sharp blade:

    Design with a mini but sharp blade, which can cut the rope or even can be used as bottle opener. Perfectly meet your emergency need.

    Powerful Magnetic Base :

    Magnet on the bottom that allows you to stick it on the top or side of your vehicle when using the flashing light (such as at night as an emergency flasher).

    Specifications:

    Size:2.8*1.2*5.9 in,easy to carry.

    Input:5V/1A

    Output:5V/1A

    Package contentet:

    1* Unifun 5 in 1 Emergency 3000mah Backup Power Bank w/Window Breaker/Seatbelt Cutter/Flashlight LED Auto Safety Tool