Crash Tests and Safety Ratings: What Does It All Mean, auto safety ratings.#Auto #safety #ratings


Crash Tests and Safety Ratings:

What Does It All Mean?

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Car commercials often tout crash test safety ratings and expect us to be impressed. But how do cars get those ratings and do they actually translate to real-life collisions? Join us as we figure it all out.

Who conducts crash testing?

In the United States, both the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) conduct crash tests to determine structural integrity and the risk of injury to drivers and passengers. Both are valid sources, but their tests differ, so it pays to give them both a closer look.

NHTSA crash tests

The NHTSA uses crash test dummies to test front, side, and rollover crashes. The car can receive 1 to 5 stars for each test based on the chance of serious injury to specific parts of the body.

Frontal impact crash tests

This test measures the force of impact after a vehicle crashes head-on into a fixed barrier (which represents another car of the same size) at 35 mph.

In a side impact test, a sedan-sized barrier moving at 38.5 mph T-bones a non-moving vehicle. Injury to both front and back seat occupants (i.e. crash test dummies) is measured.

These determine how well the car prevents occupant ejection in a rollover and how well it protects non-ejected occupants (think roof crushability).

New crash test criteria

In 2011, the NHTSA began conducting more stringent crash tests. The revised tests added some new features, such as:

  • A side impact test to simulate a crash into a telephone pole or tree
  • Crash test dummies of different sizes (after all, people come in all shapes and sizes)
  • Identifying advanced crash avoidance features (though these don’t actually factor into the car’s score)
  • Injury assessment on additional parts of the body

Plus, the new system now includes an overall safety rating, making it easier for you to assess a vehicle s safety at a glance. But keep in mind that if you’re comparing a new car to an older model, their safety ratings can’t be measured side by side.

IIHS crash tests

Rather than conducting the same crash tests as the NHTSA, the IIHS looks at other factors that could affect crashworthiness. The 2 agencies complement each other to give a fuller picture of a car’s safety. So, when you re shopping for a new car, consider both safety ratings.

Frontal offset crash tests

The IIHS places one average-sized adult male dummy in the front seat and crashes one side of the front end at 40 mph. Why one side? Because the IIHS believes that in real collisions, most drivers try to avoid the incident by turning, thus only one side of the front is impacted.

To offset the government’s side impact test (which uses a sedan-simulated barrier), the IIHS uses a barrier with the height and shape of a typical SUV or pickup. They also use smaller dummies since shorter drivers are more likely to suffer head injuries during these types of crashes.

Other tests the IIHS conducts

  • Roof strength
  • Rear crash protection/head restraint ratings
  • Electronic stability control
  • Bumper evaluations

How crash test ratings translate to real-world performance

According to the IIHS, an occupant in a car rated “good” is 46 percent less likely to die in a frontal crash than a driver of a vehicle rated “poor.” A driver of a car rated “acceptable” or “marginal” is 33 percent less likely to die than a driver of a poorly rated one.

The results are similar for side impact tests. A driver of a car rated “good” is 70 percent less likely to die in a left-side crash than a driver of a car rated “poor.” And drivers of cars rated “acceptable” or “marginal” are 64 percent and 49 percent less likely to die, respectively.

It’s hard to argue with the math. Safety ratings make a difference. But don t forget, these ratings are usually based on accidents between cars of a similar size. Crashes between cars of different sizes are a whole different ballgame. For more facts and info on how the size of your car can impact your safety during a crash, read how car size translates to car safety.


Safety Ratings Explained, ANCAP, auto safety ratings.#Auto #safety #ratings


ANCAP Safety Ratings Explained.

Compare these three vehicles, all crash tested at 64 km/h.

Auto safety ratings

Auto safety ratings

Auto safety ratings

ANCAP safety ratings are published using a rating system of 1 to 5 stars. These star ratings indicate the level of safety a vehicle provides for occupants and pedestrians in the event of a crash, as well as its ability – through technology – to avoid a crash.

ANCAP safety ratings are determined based on a series of internationally recognised, independent crash tests and safety assessments.

In all physical crash tests, dummies are used to measure the forces and likely injuries a driver, passenger or pedestrian may sustain during a crash. Observations are also made on the displacement of dummies during the crash, as well as the structural impact on the vehicle s occupant compartment. Vehicles must achieve minimum scores across all physical crash tests (for each ANCAP safety rating level), as well as meet minimum requirements for the inclusion of safety equipment and technologies.

ANCAP crash tests are conducted on new passenger and light commercial vehicles entering the Australian and New Zealand markets with each model assessed under identical testing standards and conditions. ANCAP safety ratings can be used to compare the relative safety between cars of similar mass.

To achieve the maximum 5 star ANCAP safety rating, a vehicle must perform to the highest level across all crash tests and assessments.

So the more stars, the safer we’ll be?

The diagrams below show typical injuries to the driver and passenger for each ANCAP safety rating based on the frontal offset test conducted at 64 km/h.

Latest ANCAP Safety Ratings

Auto safety ratings


How to Check Car Safety Ratings, Edmunds, auto safety ratings.#Auto #safety #ratings


How to Check Car Safety Ratings

Every year, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) conducts crash tests on new vehicles and reports their performance on its Safercar.gov Web site. For the 2015 model year, the agency will rate nearly 89 percent of the new model year vehicles under its 5-Star Safety Rating program.

Auto safety ratings

NHTSA says its crash tests of 74 2012 model-year vehicles will provide information on about 81 percent of 2012 model-year passenger vehicles sold in the United States.

Auto safety ratings

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety in 2011 tested two innovative cars: the all-electric Nissan Leaf and the plug-in hybrid Chevrolet Volt.

Auto safety ratings

NHTSA has added a small female dummy to its crash tests to better represent what would happen to a smaller adult female or a child in an accident.

Auto safety ratings

NHTSA says its crash tests of 74 2012 model-year vehicles will provide information on about 81 percent of 2012 model-year passenger vehicles sold in the United States.

Auto safety ratings

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety in 2011 tested two innovative cars: the all-electric Nissan Leaf and the plug-in hybrid Chevrolet Volt.

Auto safety ratings

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), a private nonprofit organization funded by automobile insurance companies and insurance associations, conducts its own testing program and issues its own ratings. NHTSA and IIHS conduct different tests, and neither organization tests all cars on the market. But they do test the volume sellers. IIHS also made it a point in 2011 to test such innovative cars as the all-electric Nissan Leaf and the plug-in hybrid Chevrolet Volt. NHTSA, in turn, tested the 2013 Tesla Model S, which led to a dust-up over the Tesla’s claims about the vehicle’s safety superiority.

Here are NHTSA’s Five-Star safety ratings. Note that you can’t compare 1990-2010 vehicles with those from 2011 forward. Starting with 2011 models, NHTSA introduced tougher tests and new ratings in its Five-Star system. The agency says they provide more information about vehicle safety and crash-avoidance technologies.

The IIHS ratings page includes the testing information for individual cars. You can see which vehicles earned IIHS’s Top Safety Pick designation.

Carroll leads the team of Edmunds writers who help people understand how to more easily buy and lease cars. She’s a career journalist who hopes to own a vintage VW Beetle someday.


How Will Auto Safety Ratings Change In The Future, auto safety ratings.#Auto #safety #ratings


How Will Auto Safety Ratings Change In The Future?

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Car safety has evolved at a rapid pace—a pace that likely wouldn’t be what it is if it weren’t so carefully monitored by two major safety agencies in the U.S.

They’re the federal government’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, which oversees NCAP testing, and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), a group that’s funded by the insurance industry. Together, they strive to have a safer vehicle fleet, with fewer accidents and fatalities.

While the IIHS has introduced new tests in recent years, like the small overlap frontal test and dynamic testing for front crash prevention—as well as tightened its requirements to earn its Top Safety Pick+ award—the federal ratings and tests haven’t seen a major rehab since 2010.

Auto safety ratings

NHTSA 5-star safety ratings timeline

And during that time, much has changed. For instance, active-safety systems are no longer curiosities available only on some of the most expensive luxury sedans.

Here’s how the federal government will update its five-star safety program over the next several years:

  • Introduce a new crash test
  • Use “more human-like” crash dummies
  • Rate crash-avoidance technologies
  • Assess pedestrian protection

The new crash test is a frontal oblique one that will measure occupant protection in angled frontal crashes. It should be an effective complement to the IIHS small overlap frontal test, and provide a new vehicle-structure challenge for automakers.

Auto safety ratings

Vince and Larry, the crash-test dummies

In addition to that, the federal government will improve its full frontal barrier test to assess the safety of back-seat occupants. And a new, more biofidelic test dummy design will provide more information on forces, and thus injury risk.

Neither the timeline nor the requirements themselves are yet laid down as law; they’re under a comment period until February 16, 2016.

As for the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), the other major U.S. safety agency that conducts crash-testing, don’t be surprised if it tightens some of the requirements for its existing crash tests in the near future.

Aligned on emergency braking

One area of future focus in which the federal government and the IIHS agree is on the need for automatic emergency braking (AEB) systems. And with the two agencies aligned on this issue, we anticipate within jsust a few years, he vast majority of new vehicles will be sold with automatic-braking capability.

“We are entering a new era of vehicle safety, focused on preventing crashes from ever occurring, rather than just protecting occupants when crashes happen,“ said U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx, in a joint statement earlier this year. “But if technologies such as automatic emergency braking are only available as options or on the most expensive models, too few Americans will see the benefits of this new era.”

These systems use cameras, radar, lasers, or a combination of these technologies to help detect an imminent crash, warn the driver, and then intervene by engaging the brakes—to either prevent the accident or reduce its severity—if the driver doesn’t react.


Car Safety Ratings: What are the Safest Cars 2017, auto safety ratings.#Auto #safety #ratings


9 Rides That Earned Top Car Safety Ratings for 2017

Auto safety ratingsDid you know headlights can make all the difference in determining whether a vehicle earns the best car safety ratings?

Chances are, you don’t think much about your headlights. They sit on the front of your car, they light up, and sometimes you have to change the bulb. But for the first time in 2017, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) requires an acceptable or good headlight rating in order to award its top car safety rating: Top Safety Pick+.

This designation means a vehicle earned good ratings in the IIHS’s tests for front and side crashes, roof strength, and restraints/seats, plus an advanced or superior rating for front crash prevention. One tricky thing with these ratings is the consideration of optional equipment. A lot of vehicles receive the best car safety ratings only when they’re equipped with high technology car features like forward collision warning, lane departure warning, rear-view cameras and automatic emergency braking.

When you’re driving one of the safest cars, make sure your car insurance is doing a good job of protecting you, too. Get multiple car insurance quotes in minutes, then lock-in your price and buy the best insurance for you.

Small Cars with the Best Car Safety Ratings

2017 Chevrolet Volt

The Chevrolet Volt is small but mighty. It travels up to 53 miles on a single charge before the gas engine kicks in. The 2017 Volt gets a superior rating for front crash prevention when equipped with optional Front Automatic Braking and Low-Speed Front Automatic Braking.

2017 Hyundai Elantra

The Elantra gets great safety ratings across the board for models built after March 2016. That’s when the car structure was reinforced and the front airbag was modified to better protect the driver in small overlap crashes. There’s a big difference in safety between the two available headlights, however. The HID projector lights got a good rating, while the halogen lights were rated poor.Auto safety ratings

2017 Toyota Prius

The 2017 Prius gets the best car safety ratings even without optional technology. That’s because all models come standard with the Toyota Safety Sense package, which includes a pre-collision system with pedestrian detection, lane departure alert with steering assist, auto high beams and full-speed dynamic radar cruise control.

More small cars with the best car safety ratings:

  • 2017 Mazda3
  • 2017 Subaru Impreza
  • 2017 Toyota Corolla

Midsize Cars with the Best Car Safety Ratings

2017 Honda Accord

The Honda Accord has always been good at marrying style and safety, and the 2017 model gets top safety ratings when equipped with the optional Honda Sensing package. Once again, headlights make a difference. The IIHS says the halogen lights are acceptable, but the LED projector lights earn a marginal rating.

2017 Mazda6

This sporty sedan is also one of the safest midsize cars, earning a Top Safety Pick+ rating for 2017 with optional front crash prevention. In the Mazda6, this crash prevention technology is called Smart City Brake Support, which helps detect objects ahead (at low speeds) and enables sudden braking by moving brake pads closer to the disc. The IIHS gives acceptable ratings for the available LED headlights, but only marginal ratings for the halogen lights.Auto safety ratings

2017 Volkswagen Jetta

The 2017 Jetta earns the Top Safety Pick+ rating with optional Front Assist (with Autonomous Emergency Braking). Opt for the HID projector headlights over the halogen reflector lights, which earned only a marginal rating.

More midsize cars with the best car safety ratings:

  • 2017 Kia Optima
  • 2017 Nissan Altima
  • 2017 Nissan Maxima
  • 2017 Subaru Legacy
  • 2017 Subaru Outback
  • 2017 Toyota Camry
  • 2017 Toyota Prius v

Small SUVs with the Best Car Safety Ratings

2017 Honda CR-V

The only bad thing Car and Driver notes about the 2017 CR-V is its “ubiquity” and “anonymity.” But it’s not surprising that everyone drives one, because this SUV is sleek, a gas-sipper and safe. Equipped with Honda Sensing and LED reflector headlights, it’s one of the safest small SUVs.

2017 Mitsubishi Outlander

The Outlander is a budget-priced SUV with three-row seating for up to seven passengers, making it a great family get-around car. And it gets excellent car safety ratings, as long as you opt for the Touring Package that has a Forward Collision Mitigation System and LED projector headlights.Auto safety ratings

2017 Toyota RAV4

The 2017 Toyota RAV4 Is a Top Safety Pick+ when equipped with LED headlights — and it’s a pretty fun little SUV, too. All RAV4 models come standard with Toyota’s Star Safety System. That means you get enhanced vehicle stability control, electronic brake-force distribution, brake assist and Smart Stop Technology. (This last feature sounds hi-tech, but it’s pretty basic. When you accidentally press the brake and accelerator pedals at the same time, it brings the car to a stop).


The Safest Cars of 2016, Car Safety Ratings, auto safety ratings.#Auto #safety #ratings


What Are the Safest Cars for 2016?

Auto safety ratingsCars and SUVs have gotten safer and safer over the years, to the point where it seemed like everyone gets labeled a Top Safety Pick by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). Not anymore — the rules for car safety ratings just got a lot tougher. Here s a look at the new rating system and how they name the safest cars for 2016.

Changes to Car Safety Ratings for 2016

The IIHS is a nonprofit that works to reduce deaths, injuries and property damage from car crashes. It s the leading provider of car safety ratings in the United States. Why? It crashes a lot of cars. Its Vehicle Research Center conducts independent tests on all kinds of cars, trucks and SUVs by smashing them into barriers and into each other. It labels only the safest as Top Safety Picks.

As automakers improve their cars, IIHS updates its standards. In 2012, IIHS began using the small overlap front test, which examines what happens when the front corner of a vehicle collides with another vehicle or an object like a tree or utility pole. Crashes like these bypass many safety features, placing the driver and front passenger at greater risk for injury. And in 2013, IIHS began rating vehicles for front crash prevention. This refers to crash-avoidance technology that either warns the driver of an impending frontal collision or initiates autonomous braking.

Until 2016, vehicles could be eligible for Top Safety Pick status even if they received an acceptable (not good) small overlap rating, and having a crash-avoidance system wasn t mandatory. Now, the IIHS car safety ratings require top picks to have good ratings in the small overlap front, moderate overlap front, side, roof strength and head restraint tests, as well as a standard or optional front crash prevention system. To be a Top Safety Pick+, a car or SUV has to have a superior- or advanced-rated front crash prevention system with automatic braking capabilities. That means they must stop or slow down without driver intervention before hitting a target in tests at 12 mph, 25 mph or both.

The Safest Cars: 2016 Standouts

  • Auto safety ratingsThe 2016 Scion iA, the only mini car to win Top Safety Pick+, is the first low-priced car with a standard auto brake system.
  • Only two minivans won Top Safety Pick status: the 2016 Honda Odyssey and the 2016 Kia Sedona, both with optional front crash prevention.
  • The only domestic car model that qualified for a Top Safety Pick+ award is the 2016 Chrysler 200. It s optional front crash prevention was labeled superior, avoiding a collision entirely at 12 mph.
  • Just one pickup truck made the list: the 2016 Ford F-150 SuperCrew, which is the only Ford with a good small overlap rating.

If your car was a Top Safety Pick in recent years and lost that status in 2016, don t worry. Consumers who purchased a winning 2015 model that doesn t qualify this year needn t worry that their vehicles are now less safe, says IIHS President Adrian Lund.

Driving a Safer Car Could Mean Savings

Crash test results and vehicle safety ratings factor into how much you pay for auto insurance, with safer cars earning lower car insurance premiums. A little research before you purchase could save you some money when it comes time to ensure your vehicle. If you’re planning on buying a new (or used) car soon, we recommend reading our car shopping tips for keeping your insurance premiums low.

Car Comparison Guide

Buying a new car isn t easy. Make sure to get all the facts before you make a decision. Our Car Comparison Guide will lay it all out for you — the best trucks, best cars and best SUVs, all at a price you can afford.


Car Safety Ratings: What are the Safest Cars 2017, auto safety ratings.#Auto #safety #ratings


9 Rides That Earned Top Car Safety Ratings for 2017

Auto safety ratingsDid you know headlights can make all the difference in determining whether a vehicle earns the best car safety ratings?

Chances are, you don’t think much about your headlights. They sit on the front of your car, they light up, and sometimes you have to change the bulb. But for the first time in 2017, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) requires an acceptable or good headlight rating in order to award its top car safety rating: Top Safety Pick+.

This designation means a vehicle earned good ratings in the IIHS’s tests for front and side crashes, roof strength, and restraints/seats, plus an advanced or superior rating for front crash prevention. One tricky thing with these ratings is the consideration of optional equipment. A lot of vehicles receive the best car safety ratings only when they’re equipped with high technology car features like forward collision warning, lane departure warning, rear-view cameras and automatic emergency braking.

When you’re driving one of the safest cars, make sure your car insurance is doing a good job of protecting you, too. Get multiple car insurance quotes in minutes, then lock-in your price and buy the best insurance for you.

Small Cars with the Best Car Safety Ratings

2017 Chevrolet Volt

The Chevrolet Volt is small but mighty. It travels up to 53 miles on a single charge before the gas engine kicks in. The 2017 Volt gets a superior rating for front crash prevention when equipped with optional Front Automatic Braking and Low-Speed Front Automatic Braking.

2017 Hyundai Elantra

The Elantra gets great safety ratings across the board for models built after March 2016. That’s when the car structure was reinforced and the front airbag was modified to better protect the driver in small overlap crashes. There’s a big difference in safety between the two available headlights, however. The HID projector lights got a good rating, while the halogen lights were rated poor.Auto safety ratings

2017 Toyota Prius

The 2017 Prius gets the best car safety ratings even without optional technology. That’s because all models come standard with the Toyota Safety Sense package, which includes a pre-collision system with pedestrian detection, lane departure alert with steering assist, auto high beams and full-speed dynamic radar cruise control.

More small cars with the best car safety ratings:

  • 2017 Mazda3
  • 2017 Subaru Impreza
  • 2017 Toyota Corolla

Midsize Cars with the Best Car Safety Ratings

2017 Honda Accord

The Honda Accord has always been good at marrying style and safety, and the 2017 model gets top safety ratings when equipped with the optional Honda Sensing package. Once again, headlights make a difference. The IIHS says the halogen lights are acceptable, but the LED projector lights earn a marginal rating.

2017 Mazda6

This sporty sedan is also one of the safest midsize cars, earning a Top Safety Pick+ rating for 2017 with optional front crash prevention. In the Mazda6, this crash prevention technology is called Smart City Brake Support, which helps detect objects ahead (at low speeds) and enables sudden braking by moving brake pads closer to the disc. The IIHS gives acceptable ratings for the available LED headlights, but only marginal ratings for the halogen lights.Auto safety ratings

2017 Volkswagen Jetta

The 2017 Jetta earns the Top Safety Pick+ rating with optional Front Assist (with Autonomous Emergency Braking). Opt for the HID projector headlights over the halogen reflector lights, which earned only a marginal rating.

More midsize cars with the best car safety ratings:

  • 2017 Kia Optima
  • 2017 Nissan Altima
  • 2017 Nissan Maxima
  • 2017 Subaru Legacy
  • 2017 Subaru Outback
  • 2017 Toyota Camry
  • 2017 Toyota Prius v

Small SUVs with the Best Car Safety Ratings

2017 Honda CR-V

The only bad thing Car and Driver notes about the 2017 CR-V is its “ubiquity” and “anonymity.” But it’s not surprising that everyone drives one, because this SUV is sleek, a gas-sipper and safe. Equipped with Honda Sensing and LED reflector headlights, it’s one of the safest small SUVs.

2017 Mitsubishi Outlander

The Outlander is a budget-priced SUV with three-row seating for up to seven passengers, making it a great family get-around car. And it gets excellent car safety ratings, as long as you opt for the Touring Package that has a Forward Collision Mitigation System and LED projector headlights.Auto safety ratings

2017 Toyota RAV4

The 2017 Toyota RAV4 Is a Top Safety Pick+ when equipped with LED headlights — and it’s a pretty fun little SUV, too. All RAV4 models come standard with Toyota’s Star Safety System. That means you get enhanced vehicle stability control, electronic brake-force distribution, brake assist and Smart Stop Technology. (This last feature sounds hi-tech, but it’s pretty basic. When you accidentally press the brake and accelerator pedals at the same time, it brings the car to a stop).


Car Safety Comparison Ratings – Consumer Reports #merchants #auto


#compare autos
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Several different elements affect a vehicle’s overall safety capability

Crash tests. Frontal- and side- and rear impact crash tests are conducted by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. You’ll find crash-test ratings for all tested models on their Web sites.

You’ll also find crash-test results going back 10 years in the used car vehicle profiles. NHTSA revised its testing standards for the 2011 model year. This means that test results from prior years can’t be compared with results from 2011 forward. You can see the NHTSA and IIHS ratings on our vehicle profile pages .

Accident avoidance. A vehicle’s ability to help you avoid an accident is just as important as its ability to protect you in a crash. For every accident there are numerous near misses that statistics don’t reflect. Several factors contribute to a vehicle’s accident-avoidance capability, with the two most important being braking and emergency handling. Using our test data, Consumer Reports provides an accident-avoidance Rating on all tested vehicles.

Rollover resistance. Rollover accidents account for about 33 percent of all vehicle-occupant deaths and are of particular concern with SUVs and pickups. To help consumers compare vehicles, NHTSA provides a five-star rating system called the Rollover Resistance Rating (RRR). The RRR is based on two factors: a vehicle’s static stability factor (SSF) and a dynamic rollover test. The SSF, determined from static measurements of the vehicle, essentially indicates how top-heavy it is. The dynamic test simulates a driver having to make a series of sharp steering maneuvers, as can happen in an emergency. Vehicles that tip up fail the test, but it only downgrades the overall star rating slightly.

We think a vehicle that tips up in this type of situation has serious stability problems, and we will not recommend it. RRR ratings are available at www.safercar.gov . Click on the model’s name or star ratings to get more information, and scroll down to “Rollover.” Note that prior to 2004 models, NHTSA used only the SSF to determine rollover ratings, so there are no dynamic test results.

Rear-impact protection. Although rear enders have a low fatality rate they have a high injury rate, especially for whiplash neck injuries. The design of a car’s head restraints and seats are critical factors in how severe a whiplash injury will be. CR evaluates head restraints for all seating positions in every tested vehicle. Any problems are noted in our road-test reports.

Another good source for information on rear-impact protection is the IIHS website. The institute conducts evaluations of head restraints and performs dynamic rear-impact tests that measure how well the seat/head-restraint combinations in different models protect against whiplash.

Blind zones. Every year, children are injured and killed because drivers don’t see them while backing up. A contributing factor is that some larger vehicles, such as SUVs and pickups, have larger blind zones—the area behind a vehicle that the driver can’t see. See our report on the dangers of blind spots .

To check a vehicle’s blind spot yourself, sit in the driver’s seat of the parked vehicle while someone stands in back and holds out a hand at about waist level. Have the person walk back slowly until you can see the hand through the rear window. This will give you an idea of how big that vehicle’s blind spot is.

Power-window switches. Some vehicles have rocker- or toggle-type power-window switches that will raise the window when they are pressed down or forward. This is a very risky design because a child who is leaning out of an open window can accidentally kneel on the switch and close the window, possibly causing injury or death. A better design is a lever switch, which raises the window only when it’s pulled upward.

See our cars Safety section for more information.


Security Awareness – Slogans, Mottos, Tag Lines #home #safety #slogans


#

Security Awareness Slogans, Mottos, Tag lines, Catch Phrases, Maxims.

  • Control + Alt + Delete
    When You Leave Your Seat
  • Be aware. Connect with care.
  • Before leaving the scene, clear your desk and your screen.
  • If something sounds too good to be true there s probably a scammer behind it.
  • Leave a clear desk while you’re away
    and at the end of each day.
  • Give your computer a rest when you’re not at your desk.
  • Don’t get hooked by phishers.
  • Phishing: If you suspect deceit, hit delete!
  • There’s no excuse for computer misuse.
  • Prepare for Disaster: Recover Faster.
  • SEC_RITY is not complete without U!
  • Sec-UR-rity – You are at the center.
  • Amateurs hack systems, professionals hack people. Bruce Schneier
  • Think before you click.
  • See something wrong? Do something right.
  • Care to be aware!
  • Protect personal information. The identity saved could be your own.
  • Don’t let your trash become someone else’s treasure. Feed your shredder often.
  • Passwords: Longer is Stronger.
  • You wouldn’t share your ATM pin, so why would you share your password?
  • If you suspect deceit, hit DELETE.
  • Passwords are like dirty socks. If left laying around, they’ll create a stinky mess.
  • The bug stops here. Use anti-malware programs to prevent virus infections.
  • Security by Obscurity. Don’t leave data or portable computing devices alone and in view.
  • You can’t unring a bell. Before you give PII * to anyone, make sure that access is allowed.
    (* PII stands for Personally Identifiable Information)
  • We all value privacy. Report actual or suspected spills of PII. before they become floods.
  • Because we care, we’re security aware.
  • Report data spills before molehills become mountains or small leaks become fountains.
  • Before sharing PII, know who, what, and why.
  • Good security increases shareholder value.
  • Don’t be shy about protecting PII.
  • Know how and when to say no. Don’t share protected personal information with strangers.
  • Don’t be afraid to say no.
  • To show our respect, we protect personal information that we collect.
  • Protecting PII is everyone’s job; PII is not everyone’s business.
  • Stop Neglect. Protect before you connect.

More Slogans

Slogan contributed by Nandita Divakaran, Creative Writer, Muscat

  • Information security is the immune system in the body of business.
    Slogan contributed by Kevin Pietersma, Information Security Architect, University of Toronto
  • IT Security is the immune system in the body of IT.
    Slogan provided by Kevin Pietersma, Information Security Architect, University of Toronto
  • Security is a business requirement, which can have a technical expression.
    Slogan provided by Kevin Pietersma, Information Security Architect, University of Toronto
  • Security in projects are like oil super-tankers, when steering them they need small incremental changes early in order to avoid last minute radical changes that result in a wreck.
    Slogan provided by Kevin Pietersma, Information Security Architect, University of Toronto
  • Compliance is the residue of good security.
    Slogan provided by Kevin Pietersma, Information Security Architect, University of Toronto
    • A check that does not bounce is called the Security Check. Do it everyday before you leave!
      Slogan provided by Yvette C. Gilyard, Portsmouth, VA
    • Do Your Part – Be Security Smart!
      Slogan provided by Cheri Huber, CHC, CHPC Napa County Privacy Officer
    • Don t be Quick to Click be wary when you shop online.
      Slogan provided by Vic Duca Cora
    • Restart is Smart!
      (When leaving your computer for the day, always choose restart. This allows your computer to receive updates from the IT department through the network.)
    • A user who restarts is a user after my own heart! – Valentine

      Restart slogans provided by Mirinda Feeler

      Your CAC Card – Don’t leave the office without it!

      CAC slogan provided by Herbert C. Wilson, Jr.

    • Passwords are like toothbrushes. They are best when new and should never be shared.

      Analogy provided by Kara Kirschner-Brooks, CUDE; Learning Development Specialist

      When you and your system part away,
      Your system should be first off for the day.

      Slogan provided by Zeeshan Qamer

      Your mind is a storage room of information, keep the door locked.

      Slogan provided by Irene Deichsel, FSO/Office Admin Manager, Cobham Analytic Solutions

      Link Link stop neglect .Think Think before connect!

      Slogans provided by Carbo So, MTR Corporation Limtied

    Ones that Didn’t Make the Cut

    • When passwords are heard, losses are incurred.
    • Prevent security breaches by being careful with your speeches.
    • Each of us must make a fuss if we’re asked about something we must not discuss.
    • Until we learn what breaches teach us, we’ll be a target for data leeches.
    • Prevent a security breach by keeping data out of reach.
    • Loose clicks can cause security to be deep-sixed.
    • Loose clicks invite hacker tricks.
    • Data spills provide no thrills (unless you’re the bad guy).
    • Sec U R IT y – Tag! You’re it!
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    Safe Driving Tips for Teenage Drivers # #teen #drivers, #teen #driver #safety, #car #insurance #


    #

    Safe Driving Tips For Teenage Drivers

    It’s a fact: teenage drivers account for more auto accidents than any other age group.

    However, by practicing safe driving techniques―such as driving defensively―you’ll increase the odds you’ll keep yourself (and your passengers) safe on the road and you’ll increase your changes of getting more affordable car insurance as you build a good driving record.

    Safety Tips for Teen Drivers

    Whether you’re just getting ready to hit the road or have been driving for months―or even years―take some time to review these 8 safe driving tips.

    1) Keep Your Cell Phone Off

    Multiple studies indicate using a cell phone while driving is the equivalent of driving drunk ―that’s even when using a hands-free phone.

    NOTE . Your state may prohibit the use of cell phones while driving. An increasing amount of states are creating laws regarding cell phone use and texting. Often, younger drivers face stricter laws.

    2) Don’t Text

    Research shows texting―on average―causes a loss of focus on the road for 4.6 seconds. You can drive the length of a full football field in that time. A lot can go wrong while you drive the length of a football field without your eyes on the road.

    Don’t try the “texting-while-stopped” approach, either, as many states ban texting while behind the wheel. And, when you have your head down, you won’t notice key developments that may occur. Remember, you still need to pay attention to the road when you’re stopped.

    3) Turn on Your Headlights

    Using your headlights increases your visibility and help other drivers see you, even when you feel like it’s light out.

    In the early morning and early evening (dusk), you need to use your lights or other drivers might not see you, which can be disastrous.

    4) Obey the Speed Limit

    Speeding is a major contributor to fatal teen accidents. That’s especially true when driving on roads with lots of traffic or with which you’re not familiar.

    Don’t feel pressured to keep up with traffic if it seems like everyone else is flying by you. Driving a safe speed helps ensure your well-being, and keeps you away from costly traffic tickets that can cause a sharp hike in your auto insurance premiums.

    5) Minimize Distractions

    It may be tempting to eat, drink, flip around the radio dial, or play music loudly while you’re cruising around town; however, all can cause your mind or vision to wander, even for a few seconds.

    As an inexperienced driver, you are more apt to lose control of your car. Distractions can significantly increase the chances that you 1) not notice impending danger or notice it too late and 2) lose the ability to control the vehicle.

    6) Drive Solo

    Having a single teen passenger in your car can double the risk of causing a car accident. Adding additional teen passengers causes the risk to escalate.

    7) Practice Defensive Driving

    Always be aware of the traffic ahead, behind, and next to you, and have possible escape routes in mind. Stay at least one car length behind the car in front of you in slower speeds, and maintain a larger buffer zone with faster speeds.

    Some car insurance companies will even give you a discount if you take an approved defensive driving course to improve your driving skills.

    8) Choose a Safe Car

    If possible, drive a safe car with the latest safety equipment (such as anti-lock brakes, electronic stability control, and air bags), and one with an excellent crash safety record.

    Final Word: Teens Becoming Safe Drivers

    There’s no substitute for driving experience and the wisdom that age brings, but by applying the above tips you’ll enhance the odds you won’t become a teenage driver accident statistic. Also, when you have a good driving record free of accidents, it’s easier to find cheap car insurance in the future.

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