Ssae 16 Type Ii #is #ssae #16 #needed,reports,reviewing #ssae #16,ssae #16,ssae #16 #audit #review,ssae #16 #review,ssae #16 #review #checklist,ssae #16 #reviews,ssae #review,ssae #reviews,ssae-18,ssae16,ssae16 #review,standards,third #party #ssae #guidance #review,who #is #required #to #have #a #ssae #16,who #is #required #to #have #ssae #16,why #get #ssae #16,audit #intensedebate,leave #a #reply: #name #(required): #website: #comments: #submit, #moderation,\’leave #a #reply\’ #\’name #(required)\’ #\’mail #(will #not #be #published) #(required)\’ #\’website\’ #it #services,controls,how #do #you #prepare #for #an #ssae #16 #audit,how #to #prepare #for #a #ssae #16,how #to #prepare #for #an #ssae #16 #audit,new #avenues #for #ssae #16,preparing #for #a #ssae #16,preparing #for #ssae #16,report #writing,ssae #16 #audit #preparation,ssae #16 #consulting #do #we #need,ssae #16 #preparation,ssae #16 #report,ssae #no. #16,example #soc #1 #report,soc #1,soc #1 #report,soc #1 #reports,soc #1 #type #2,soc #1 #type #2 #report,soc #1 #type #ii #report,soc #2,soc #3,soc #i,soc #report,soc #reporting,soc #type,soc #type #1 #report,soc-1 #report,soc1,soc1 #report,soc1 #reporting,soc1 #soc2,ssae #16 #reports,ssae #16 #soc #1,ssae16 #compliant #soc #1,system #and #organization #control #report,what #is #a #soc #1 #report,what #is #a #soc1 #report,what #is #ssae #16 #soc #1 #and #soc #2 #difference,at-c #320,cost,definition #soc #1 #ssae #16,how #ssea #16 #helps #auditors,prices,pricing,soc #1 #audit,ssae #16 #audit,ssae #16 #audit #checklist,ssae #16 #audit #report,ssae #16 #audit #requirements,ssae #16 #auditing #standard,ssae #16 #auditor,ssae #16 #checklist,ssae #16 #cost,ssae #16 #costs,ssae #16 #prices,ssae #17 #audit,ssae #18 #report,ssae #soc #auditing #and #reporting,ssae16 #audit,ssae16 #audit #report,ssae16 #checkilst,what #is #a #ssae #16 #audit,what #is #ssae #16 #audit,what #is #ssae16 #audit,what #is #the #purpose #of #a #ssae #16 #audit?


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The SSAE 18 Reporting Standard SOC 1 SOC 2 SOC 3 Support and Guidance for SSAE18, SOC 1, SOC 2, and SOC 3 reporting standards

Some organizations have heard of SAS 70, SSAE 16. and soon to be SSAE 18. but, don t really know WHY they need to pay to have a bunch of auditors trounce through their company for a month or two during the year, especially right after their financial audit just finished.
The answer is simple: Many companies will not even think about using your company to perform services for them without a clean Type II Report in place.
Some benefits of having an SSAE 16 performed :

  • Ability to perform outsourcing services for Public Companies.
    • If performing financially significant duties for a Public Company, they are required to use a SSAE 16 qualified provider as it is the only way to give investors assurance over controls that are not performed by the Company in question.
  • Public and Private companies are more likely to trust your organization with their data.
    • If you were to trust a company with your data, you would want complete assurance it will be handled with the utmost care
  • A year round accessible knowledge source (your auditors).
    • As a service organization, large or small, you will always have questions regarding your business and having a set of auditors in place with access to a wide array of business knowledge, it will allow you to bounce your questions and concerns off of a group of trusted individuals.
  • A third party to review your controls and activities to ensure they are functioning appropriately, and give advice on how to improve upon them.
    • Sometimes your internal audit department is good, but, not always as stringent as they should be. This will help to serve as a check on their work, as well as your staff. Additionally, if there were any findings noted, your auditors are in a great position to give you some tricks and tips to improve to ensure everything functions well the following period.
  • Improving performance of the organization.
    • Just the knowledge that a review is being performed of an employee s work that can have far reaching consequences for the company as a whole. No more, Oh, I didn t realize that reviewing user access was THAT important to do this month, sorry , now, everyone knows that if it s not done, the success or failure of the organization could rest upon them.

Think of the SSAE 16 or SSAE-18 audit as an annual investment into your company, increasing potential new clients. productivity and accountability .

This tip is focused on designing controls that reflect the process being testing, if they don t, a headache of massive proportions will be created once testing begins.
What do you do to make sure you don t screw this up? Have as many meetings as it takes to get it right.
What you need to do is sit down with the auditors, the department lead, the main employees responsible for performing the process, and anyone else whom could either play a role in testing or modifying the control in the future. Once that is done, Management should discuss what they determined the control to be and how it should operate, that is then reviewed by the auditors, and then the employees performing the tasks should be reconsulted to verify that the control still reflects their process accurately.
Many times people try to speed this process up and half-ass it, leaving many open items which upon testing could easily blow up into a huge problem. When the control isn t 100% agreed upon prior to testing and a deviation is noted, it s a tough call between failing the control and the ability to adjust it to accurately reflect the process. The problem is modifying a control after testing has begun is not proper and needs to be avoided at all costs.
Locking the controls locked down early on could save weeks in wrapping up your new SSAE 16 Report.
We have seen issues like this cause delays in issuing of the report to the client and running additional fees, since adjusting controls isn t free. Coming from the perspective of the auditor, we can let you know the pitfalls, consequences and how to best navigate the audit process. If you have any comments or questions please leave them below!

A SOC 1 Report (System and Organization Controls Report ) is a report on Controls at a Service Organization which are relevant to user entities’ internal control over financial reporting. The SOC1 Report is what you would have previously considered to be the standard SAS70, complete with a Type I and Type II reports, but falls under the SSAE 16 guidance (and soon to be SSAE 18 ).

Please see the following articles discussing the SSAE 16 guidance and additional information related to the SOC 1 (Type I and Type II) Reports:

In addition to the SOC 1 report which is restricted to controls relevant to an audit of a user entity’s financial statements, the SOC 2 and SOC 3 reports have been created to address controls relevant to operations and compliance and will be discussed in further detail in the future.

Please see the SOC 1 Reporting Guide page for additional information.

SSAE 16 is an enhancement to the current standard for Reporting on Controls at a Service Organization, the SAS70. The changes made to the standard will bring your company, and the rest of the companies in the US, up to date with new international service organization reporting standards, the ISAE 3402. The adjustments made from SAS 70 to SSAE 16 will help you and your counterparts in the US compete on an international level; allowing companies around the world to give you their business with complete confidence .

SSAE16 is now effective as of June 15, 2011, and if you have not made the necessary adjustments required, now is the time to find a quality provider to discuss the proper steps. All organizations are now required to issue their Service Auditor Reports under the SSAE 16 standards in an SOC 1 Report.

The soon to be effective, SSAE-18. is expected to follow a similar reporting structure to the SSAE-16 within a SOC 1 report.

Who Needs an SSAE 16 (SOC 1 ) Audit?

If your Company (the Service Organization ) performs outsourced services that affect the financial statements of another Company (the User Organization ), you will more than likely be asked to provide an SSAE16 Type II Report, especially if the User Organization is publicly traded.
Some example industries include:

  • Payroll Processing
  • Loan Servicing
  • Data Center /Co-Location/Network Monitoring Services
  • Software as a Service (SaaS )
  • Medical Claims Processors

What you Need to Know:

Before starting the SSAE 16 process, there are a number of considerations one must take into account that can save considerable time, effort, and money in the long run. Use the following items as a mini checklist for yourself:

  • Does my Company need an SSAE16, or, are we doing it just because someone asked?
  • Reports on the low end can run at least $15,000 a year, will the business lost be less of a burden than the cost of the report itself?
  • Does your company have defined Business Process and IT controls in place, or, will you need assistance developing and implementing them (readiness assessment)?
  • Have you determined the controls in place which affect the outsourced services being provided?
  • Have key stakeholders been defined and included in discussions?

There are many other issues to consider before engaging a CPA firm to help with your SSAE 16, for a more detailed checklist please see The SSAE 16 Checklist

You may have heard SSAE-18 is on the horizon for reports issued as of May 1, 2017. There are some important updates discussed in here: SSAE-18 An Update to SSAE-16 .

As the standard is formalized and the date approaches we will continue to provide more information to help you prepare for these changes.


Ethanol Fuel History #history,ethanol,article,ethanol #fuel,fuel #test #kit,fuel,gas,gas #pump,e10,e85,dangers,problems,renewable #fuel,corn,reformulated #fuel,marine,marine #fuel,automobile #fuel,alcohol #fuel,ethanol #alcohol,water #in #fuel,marine #engine #fuel,auto,vehicle,environment,mtbe,ban,epa,politics,organization,association,corn #fuel,testing,phase #separation,vapor #lock,warning,


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In 1908, Ford Motor Company’s first car, The Model T, used ethanol corn alcohol gasoline as fuel energy.

Since 2003, ethanol has grown rapidly as the oxygenating factor for gasoline. Ethanol replaced MTBE for oxygenating fuel, since almost all states now have banned MTBE, due to groundwater contamination, health and environmental concerns.

Ethanol blend fuels for gas powered engines have been around for over 100 years; Ethanol is now found at most public gas stations nationwide, due to mandates/laws and recommendations in the Alternative Motor Fuels Act (1988), Clean Air Act (1990), Energy Policy Act (2005) and most importantly – The Renewable Fuel Standard Program (RFS) – Signed September 2006.

The push for ethanol as an alternative to imported oil spurred the construction of 172 plants in 25 states by the end of 2008. But during 2009 falling oil prices has made ethanol less cost effective. More than 20 plants have recently closed.

Despite 10% being the universally accepted legal limit for ethanol in conventional gas-powered engines,

in March 2009 ACE, Growth Energy and 54 ethanol producers submitted a waiver application to increase E10 to E15.

ETHANOL HISTORY TIMELINE

1826 Samuel Morey developed an engine that ran on ethanol and turpentine.

1850’s During the Civil War, a liquor tax was placed on ethanol whisky, also called Moonshine, to raise money for the war.

1876 Otto Cycle was the first combustion engine designed to use alcohol and gasoline.

1896 Henry Ford built his first automobile, the quadricycle, to run on pure ethanol.

1920’s Standard Oil began adding ethanol to gasoline to increase octane and reduce engine knocking.

1908 The first Ford Motor Company automobile, Henry Ford’s Model T. was designed to use corn alcohol, called ethanol. The Model T ran on (ethanol) alcohol, fuel or a combination of the two fuels.

1940’s First U.S. fuel ethanol plant built. The U.S. Army built and operated an ethanol plant in Omaha, Nebraska, to produce fuel for the army and to provide ethanol for regional fuel blending.

1940’s to late 1970’s Virtually no commercial fuel ethanol was sold to the general public in the U.S. – due to the low price of gasoline fuel.

1975 U.S. begins to phase out lead in gasoline. MTBE eventually replaced lead.

Note: Later, between 2004 to 2006, MTBE banned in almost all states, due to groundwater contamination and health risks.

1980’s Oxygenates added to gasoline included MTBE (Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether – made from natural gas and petroleum) and ETBE (Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether – made from ethanol and petroleum).

1988 Denver, Colorado, was the first state to mandate ethanol oxygenates fuels for winter use to control carbon monoxide emissions. Other cities soon followed.

1990 Clean Air Act Amendments – Mandated the winter use of oxygenated fuels in 39 major carbon monoxide non-attainment areas (based on EPA emissions standards for carbon dioxide not being met) and required year-round use of oxygenates in 9 severe ozone non-attainment areas in 1995.

1992 The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) was passed by Congress to reduce our nation’s dependence on imported petroleum by requiring certain fleets to acquire alternative fuel vehicles, which are capable of operating on nonpetroleum fuels.

The Clean Air Act (1990) and Alternative Motor Fuels Act (1998 1992) contain provisions for mandating oxygenated fuel (RFG =Ethanol and MTBE). Requirements set for 2 types of clean-burning gasoline, RFG Federal Reformulated Gasoline and Wintertime Oxygenated Fuel.

1995 The EPA began requiring the use of reformulated gasoline year round in metropolitan areas with the most smog.


Crawl Space Insulation #thermal #insulation, #crawl #space, #crawl #space #insulation, #energy #conservation #(organization #sector), #energy #efficiency, #green #remodeling, #save #energy, #basemen…


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Это видео недоступно.

Crawl Space Insulation

Опубликовано: 6 авг. 2013 г.

Welcome to the second Episode of the All Things “Basementy”! Video series.

In this episode, Larry Janesky, owner and founder of Basement Systems, demonstrates the best way to insulate a crawl space. He shows how to make it not only energy-efficient, but also fully protected against high humidity and the typical moisture-related problems that plague millions of crawl spaces across the U.S. and Canada.

Larry Janesky is not only a world’s authority in crawl space environment, with over 20 years of experience in the field, but he is also the pioneer in the crawl space encapsulation industry, having developed the first and to date, the most advanced crawl space encapsulation system in industry: the revolutionary CleanSpace.

The insulation method recommended by Larry is basically an evolution of the CleanSpace concept — it is an all-in-one approach that includes the crawl space into the building envelope, by completely isolating it from the outside and from the ground.
This approach offers superior thermal protection by preventing heat transfers through the walls and ground and curbing energy losses due to air leakage as well.

It is also a better alternative for most crawl spaces than to simply insulate the floor above the crawl because it provides moisture protection for the entire space, not just the floor above it.

After drainage was corrected with a crawl space drainage system and a sump pump system, the floor was covered with a drainage mat to allow the water to flow underneath and reach the drain tiles.

The walls of the crawl space were then lined with SilverGlo rigid foam boards. SilverGlo is an extended polystyrene foam board infused with graphite that helps increase the material’s R-Value up to 24%. The SilverGlo is also lined with a radiant liner on both sides. This silver lining acts as a vapor barrier keeping the moisture seeping through the walls from evaporating into the crawl. Inside the crawl, the silver lining also helps reflect heat back into the space.

TerraBlock insulation boards were then used on top of the drainage mat, to prevent heat loss through the ground. The entire floor was then lined with the CleanSpace liner: a UV treated, puncture-resistant, multi-layered 20mil plastic liner with a built-in antimicrobial layer that will prevent mold growth. The clean space was then fastened to the walls and floor and thoroughly air sealed.

This homeowner now enjoys a healthier and more comfortable home: no more humidity, mold and nasty smells from the crawl space during the summer, and no more cold drafts and cold floors during the winter. His energy bills are also much lower because without losing or gaining heat through the crawl, his HVAC system works more efficiently!

Basement Systems and CleanSpace dealers have effectively treated and permanently fixed thousands of crawl spaces across the U.S.- we’ve been doing it longer than anyone else in industry! If you need help with your crawl space, trust the world’s expert in All Things “Basementy”! Call or visit our website to schedule a free, in-home crawl space inspection and estimate!

Want to learn more about basements and crawl spaces? Subscribe to our YouTube channel to be notified of all the upcoming All Things “Basementy”! videos!

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