2017 Nissan Sentra vs #2017 #nissan #sentra, #2017 #toyota #corolla, #compare, #vs., #review, #msrp, #invoice, #rebate, #incentive, #lease, #cash #back, #finance, #cost, #warranty, #mpg, #fuel #economy, #engine, #seating, #seats, #city, #highway, #car #photos, #safety, #crash #test, #safety #ratings


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2017 Nissan Sentra vs. 2017 Toyota Corolla Review

Comparison Review

Comfort
Passengers in the back seat will be able to stretch out a lot more in the Toyota Corolla than the Nissan Sentra, due to its greater head- and legroom. Offering just a little more front head- and legroom than the Toyota Corolla, the Nissan Sentra may be a little roomier and more comfortable for the driver and front seat passengers.

Convenience
You’ll be making about the same number of stops at the gas station with the Nissan Sentra as you will with the Toyota Corolla, as they get the same number of miles per tank of gas.

Cost
There are a lot of factors to consider when calculating the overall cost of a vehicle. The main consideration is Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP). When looking only at MSRP, the Nissan Sentra will have less of an impact on your bank account than the Toyota Corolla. Another consideration is the Destination Charge, which is a standard charge for transporting the vehicle to the dealer from where it’s built. The Nissan Sentra and the Toyota Corolla have similar Destination Charges.

Dimensions
The Nissan Sentra is about the same width as the Toyota Corolla. When looking at overall length, the Nissan Sentra takes up about the same amount of space in your garage as the Toyota Corolla.

Drivetrain
With similar torque, the Nissan Sentra and the Toyota Corolla do an equal job of transmitting their engine’s power to their wheels.

Handling
The Nissan Sentra has a smaller turning radius than the Toyota Corolla, allowing you to more easily maneuver in and out of tight spots.

Performance
The Nissan Sentra has less horsepower than the Toyota Corolla, so it will probably be somewhat slower.

Utility
In terms of seating you’ll be able to fit the same number of people in both the Nissan Sentra and the Toyota Corolla. The Nissan Sentra has a roomier cargo area for holding your bags or other items than the Toyota Corolla.

Warranty
The Nissan Sentra comes with essentially the same basic warranty as the Toyota Corolla.

Compare the 2017 Nissan Sentra and the 2017 Toyota Corolla.

Become a NewCars.com Dealer Partner today.

Helpful Links

Certain specifications, prices and equipment data have been provided under license from Chrome Data Solutions (“Chrome Data”). 2017 Chrome Data Solutions, LP. All Rights Reserved. This information is supplied for personal use only and may not be used for any commercial purpose whatsoever without the express written consent of Chrome Data. Chrome Data makes no guarantee or warranty, either expressed or implied, including without limitation any warranty of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose, with respect to the data presented here. All specifications, prices and equipment are subject to change without notice.

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Don t Pay MSRP! Find our Lowest Price on a New Car! #auto #batteries


#auto pricing
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2015 Honda Civic

Over the past month, we helped 97,584 new car buyers find their perfect car!

New/Notable:

  • Sold in coupe or sedan body styles
  • Best-selling compact car in America
  • Carryover with no updates for 2015

The 2015 Honda Civic is the latest version of the popular compact car and carries over unchanged for the 2015 model year.

The last few years have been very busy for the Civic. It got a complete redesign in 2012, a refresh for sedan models in 2013, and a refresh for the coupe and Si in 2014, so Honda s engineers get to take a breath for 2015.

Exterior styling varies by body style, with the sedan offering a more sedate look while the coupe is much more menacing, with sharper lines and a more aggressive front end. The coupe also has a pair of very prominent fog light recesses flanking the lower air intake which give the Civic coupe a distinct look up front. There are no less than six wheel choices, and fog lights and a power moonroof are optional. Sporty Si models get their own visual signatures, with side sills and Si badging, along with unique wheels.

Coupe and Sedan models share a 143-hp, 1.8-liter four-cylinder engine. Last year, the Civic got a new CVT transmission with paddle shifters that replaced the five-speed automatic. It joins a five-speed manual among the transmission options, while the Si gets a six-speed manual. The Civic puts a premium on fuel economy; sedan models return 30/39 mpg city/highway with the CVT (28/36 with the manual), with the coupe achieving similar figures (29/38 on higher trim levels). Under the hood of Si models is a 205-hp, 2.4-liter four-cylinder.

Since the updates in 2013 and 2014, the Civic cabin has been a personal favorite thanks to its liberal use of high quality materials, backseat room, and comfortable seating. It s a compact car that feels larger and more upscale than its compact price would suggest. Similar to the sporty CR-Z, the center console is slightly canted towards the driver offering easier access to controls for the climate and audio systems. Standard features include a color i-MID display, Bluetooth connectivity, Pandora internet radio, SMS support, and a USB/iPod port, all of which make the Civic one of the most tech friendly out of the box cars around. A navigation system, leather upholstery, and heated front seats are optional.

The 2015 Civic also offers a class-exclusive standard rearview camera, along with antilock brakes, six airbags, and an electronic stability system with traction control. For its performance in crash testing, the Civic got a full five-star overall rating from the NHTSA, their highest designation.

2015 CarPriceSecrets.com . All rights reserved.


2017 Toyota Tacoma vs #2017 #toyota #tacoma, #2017 #toyota #tundra, #compare, #vs., #review, #msrp, #invoice, #rebate, #incentive, #lease, #cash #back, #finance, #cost, #warranty, #mpg, #fuel #economy, #engine, #seating, #seats, #city, #highway, #car #photos, #safety, #crash #test, #safety #ratings


#

2017 Toyota Tacoma vs. 2017 Toyota Tundra Review

Comparison Review

Comfort
Due to its greater head- and legroom, passengers in the extended cab will be able to stretch out a lot more in the Toyota Tundra than in the Toyota Tacoma. As far as headroom and legroom go, there’s not much difference between the Toyota Tacoma and the Toyota Tundra.

Convenience
You’ll be making about the same number of stops at the gas station with the Toyota Tacoma as you will with the Toyota Tundra, as they can travel a similar number of miles on a tank of gas.

Cost
There are a lot of factors to consider when calculating the overall cost of a vehicle. The main consideration is Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP). Clearly, the Toyota Tacoma is a better financial choice over the Toyota Tundra, when considering MSRP. Another consideration is the Destination Charge, which is a standard charge for transporting the vehicle to the dealer from where it’s built. The Toyota Tacoma carries a much lower Destination Charge than the Toyota Tundra.

Dimensions
Since the Toyota Tacoma is much slimmer than the Toyota Tundra, it’ll be much easier to find a wide enough space in a crowded parking lot. If you go with the Toyota Tacoma, you’ll have a much easier time finding a large enough space to park than you will with the Toyota Tundra.

Drivetrain
With its lower torque engine, the Toyota Tacoma doesn’t do as good a job transmitting horsepower to its wheels as the Toyota Tundra.

Handling
The Toyota Tacoma has a smaller turning radius than the Toyota Tundra, allowing you to more easily get in and out of tight spots.

Performance
If you’ve got something you need to tow, the Toyota Tacoma will do just as well as the Toyota Tundra, since they have about the same towing capacity. The Toyota Tacoma has a little less horsepower than the Toyota Tundra.

Utility
The Toyota Tacoma has less seating than the Toyota Tundra, making the Toyota Tundra the better choice if you often have passengers.

Warranty
The Toyota Tacoma comes with essentially the same basic warranty as the Toyota Tundra.

Compare the 2017 Toyota Tacoma and the 2017 Toyota Tundra.

Become a NewCars.com Dealer Partner today.

Helpful Links

Certain specifications, prices and equipment data have been provided under license from Chrome Data Solutions (“Chrome Data”). 2017 Chrome Data Solutions, LP. All Rights Reserved. This information is supplied for personal use only and may not be used for any commercial purpose whatsoever without the express written consent of Chrome Data. Chrome Data makes no guarantee or warranty, either expressed or implied, including without limitation any warranty of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose, with respect to the data presented here. All specifications, prices and equipment are subject to change without notice.

Uh oh! This site will not function properly if you have JavaScript turned off.

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    Click on the Tools Options Content tab. Check the Enable Javascript box. Click OK. Refresh your browser.
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    Click the Chrome menu on the browser toolbar. Then select Settings. Click “Show advanced settings”. In the “Privacy” section, click the “Content settings” button. Click on the option to “Allow all sites to run JavaScript (recommended)”. Then click “Done”. Refresh your browser.
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How to Get a Vehicle – s MSRP #auto #emblems


#used auto prices
#

How to Get a Vehicle s MSRP

in Buying Selling

Manufacturer s suggested retail price (MSRP) – nicknamed sticker price – is the recommended selling price car companies assign new vehicles .

This price is not firm. It s a suggestion for dealerships, and depending how the vehicle type is selling, dealerships may adjust the actual selling price either lower (for slow selling cars) or higher (for vehicles selling fast) than the MSRP.

MSRP only applies to new vehicles. It does not apply to used cars because the value of a vehicle drops the second it is sold and driven out of a car lot.

However, when shopping for a used car. it s good to know the MSRP of the vehicle you re eying. The advantages of knowing it include:

  • It gives you an idea on how well the vehicle you re considering held its value.
  • It allows you to gauge if the car s asking price is fair.
  • You can use it for estimating vehicle registration costs, as well as the vehicle tax, using an online tax calculator .

Find MSRP for Used Vehicles to Gauge Car Registration Cost

The process for finding an MSRP is relatively easy. You can locate it from any of the following sources:

  • Call the service department for a franchise dealer for the make of the car in question. Based on the car s vehicle identification number (VIN), ask if they can print out a copy of the original invoice.
  • Visit the website for New Car Test Drive. Search under the Car Reviews tab for the make, model and year of the vehicle you re searching – it lists information on used vehicles dating back many years. After entering the information, you ll receive a page with prices, including the MSRP.

For more on purchasing a vehicle and the costs that come with it, check out our Buying and Selling section.

Was this information helpful?


How to Get a Vehicle – s MSRP #auto #zone.com


#used auto prices
#

How to Get a Vehicle s MSRP

in Buying Selling

Manufacturer s suggested retail price (MSRP) – nicknamed sticker price – is the recommended selling price car companies assign new vehicles .

This price is not firm. It s a suggestion for dealerships, and depending how the vehicle type is selling, dealerships may adjust the actual selling price either lower (for slow selling cars) or higher (for vehicles selling fast) than the MSRP.

MSRP only applies to new vehicles. It does not apply to used cars because the value of a vehicle drops the second it is sold and driven out of a car lot.

However, when shopping for a used car. it s good to know the MSRP of the vehicle you re eying. The advantages of knowing it include:

  • It gives you an idea on how well the vehicle you re considering held its value.
  • It allows you to gauge if the car s asking price is fair.
  • You can use it for estimating vehicle registration costs, as well as the vehicle tax, using an online tax calculator .

Find MSRP for Used Vehicles to Gauge Car Registration Cost

The process for finding an MSRP is relatively easy. You can locate it from any of the following sources:

  • Call the service department for a franchise dealer for the make of the car in question. Based on the car s vehicle identification number (VIN), ask if they can print out a copy of the original invoice.
  • Visit the website for New Car Test Drive. Search under the Car Reviews tab for the make, model and year of the vehicle you re searching – it lists information on used vehicles dating back many years. After entering the information, you ll receive a page with prices, including the MSRP.

For more on purchasing a vehicle and the costs that come with it, check out our Buying and Selling section.

Was this information helpful?


New Car Prices: MSRP, Invoice Price, Dealer Cost #japan #auto #parts


#auto invoice prices
#

New Car Invoice Price, Dealer Cost w/ Holdback MSRP

Pricing Tips You Should Know:

  • The new car invoice price and true dealer cost is not the same. Dealer cost is lower.
  • Knowing the true dealer cost gives you needed leverage when it comes time to negotiate a great price at the dealer.
  • Negotiate from the cost up and not MSRP down.
  • Use the top online price services to save time and money – read our review for:

New Car Prices:

Helpful Pricing Resources and Guides:

  • Dealer Cost Calculator – True dealer cost is a must know when buying new cars. This will calculate dealer cost of any new car.
  • How to Buy New Cars Below Dealer Invoice Prices – Save Thousands on your next new car.
  • New Car Dealer Cost – A complete explanation of what it is and why you need to know the true dealer cost.

It pays to be educated when buying a car. Before you dig into doing any serious research, you should familiarize yourself with some of the most common car pricing terms. Without understand what they mean, you’ll have a tough time clicking your way to the best information. Definitions for a few of the best ones are highlighted below.

Must Know New Car Price Terms:

MSRP refers to manufacturer’s suggested retail price. It is the published amount that a car manufacturer advises dealers to charge. Of course, the MSRP is merely the starting point in negotiations at the dealership. In fact, many people disregard MSRP altogether while negotiating.

The MSRP, or sticker price, is typically listed on the spec sheet that’s affixed to a new car. In some instances, it’s not listed at all. Dealers sometimes omit the MSRP when a car is especially in demand. By not advertising the MSRP, the dealer may be able to start negotiations at a higher amount.

It should be noted that MSRP does not reflect the “out the door” amount that you should expect to pay. It doesn’t include registration, taxes, destination charges or other fees. Although MSRPs are ostensibly used to protect consumers, they are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to getting a great price on a vehicle.

Dealer Invoice Price – The invoice price of a new vehicle is the price on an invoice the manufacturer sends a dealer when they acquire a vehicle. many people believe that this is the true dealer cost of the vehicle, but in many cases – it is not, Invoice prices have hidden profit built into them such as dealer holdback and manufacturer to dealer incentives. (See below.)

Dealer Holdback – Dealer holdback reflects a percentage of the MSRP or invoice price that is paid back to a dealer by the manufacturer. Manufacturers usually pay this withheld amount back quarterly, but practices do vary. Holdbacks came into widespread use a few years ago. They are used to improve dealer profits by inflating invoice prices. They primarily do that by reducing the gross profit of a sale. In turn, the salesperson who was involved in the transaction earns a lower commission.

Another reason that dealer holdbacks, which are usually about two to three percent of the MSRP, are so popular is because they allow dealers to offer special deals while still earning handsome profits. Dealers can legitimately say they are offering vehicles at invoice prices but recoup hundreds of dollars later.

While it’s beneficial to be aware of dealer holdbacks, you probably won’t have much luck using them during your negotiations. It’s smart to know they exist, but dealers hold tightly to them. You can use them in a roundabout way to negotiate a lower price.

Dealer Incentives – Dealer incentives are often referred to as factory-to-dealer incentives. They reduce the dealer’s true cost to buy a vehicle. In some instances, those savings may be passed along to consumers. Dealer incentives are often offered on a regional basis in order to bolster sales for a specific model. Other times, they are used to reward dealers who reach a certain sales target.

Dealers are not required to pass these incentives on to consumers. If you can track down specific information about a current dealer incentive that’s not being passed on to buyers, it may give you the leverage you need to get a better price. However, because these incentives often vary by region, it isn’t always easy to pin them down successfully. It never hurts to keep your eyes peeled though.

Regional Ad Fees – In the vast majority of cases, regional ad fees are not negotiable. That’s because they are usually itemized on dealer invoices, and they are a firm part of a dealer’s cost. They are the way in which manufacturers recoup some of the expense of promoting and marketing specific models. When these fees appear on a dealer invoice, you can bet your bottom dollar that they will be on your sales contract too.

In some cases, however, the dealer invoice doesn’t include these fees. If it doesn’t, but they appear on your sales contract, you may have some wiggle room. It all depends on the specific dealer and on the amount that you are paying. Before you head to the dealership, go online to consult the many lists that outline regional advertising fees by manufacturer. They can help you get a better grasp about how much these fees come into play.

Destination Fees – To arrive on dealer lots, new cars have to be transported from automobile manufacturing plants. The expense of doing so is charged to the dealer by the manufacturer, who then passes it along to the consumer. The total amount is usually several hundreds of dollars. As nice as it would be to somehow negotiate away these fees, it simply isn’t possible. The amount differs depending on the model and the manufacturer, but it has nothing to do with how far the vehicle had to be transported.

Manufacturer Incentives and Rebates – Three of the most popular manufacturer rebates and incentives are designed to be passed along to consumers. Low-interest financing, cash rebates and special leases are all offered from time to time to stimulate sales. Sometimes, they are offered as first-time buyer specials, employee discounts, military discounts and other incentives.

These incentives reduce the net price of the vehicle. You can use an online calculator to determine whether a cash rebate, which can be applied as a down payment, or low-interest financing is better.

Now that these terms have been demystified, you should have a much easier time conducting research before buying the vehicle that you want.

True Dealer Cost:

The Dealer Costs Formula:

Invoice Price – Holdback – Rebates Incentives (If any)= Dealer Cost

Take the Invoice price and subtract the holdback. (Percentages Below). Take this amount and subtract any manufacturer rebates. To get the rebates simply fill in a price quote from one of the recommended services listed – you will receive the rebate you are entitled to in your area. (If Any)

Holdback Calculations:

  • If a % of “Total” MSRP or Invoice make sure you add all the manufacturers options to the price when calculating holdback
  • If a % of “Base” MSRP or Invoice, calculate hold back on the Base price before you add the options

Note: The price guides above do not include state taxes, license fees, or manufacturers Rebates. To calculate your on the road price, add you state taxes and License fee – then subtract your manufacturer rebate if any.

A note about rebates: Most rebates are subtracted from the “on the road” figure. In most cases, you can have the rebate if you are arranging your own financing or you are paying cash. If you decide to use the manufacturer’s low interest financing, you do not usually get the rebate. Ask your dealer for details.


New Car Prices: MSRP, Invoice Price, Dealer Cost


#auto invoice prices
#

New Car Invoice Price, Dealer Cost w/ Holdback MSRP

Pricing Tips You Should Know:

  • The new car invoice price and true dealer cost is not the same. Dealer cost is lower.
  • Knowing the true dealer cost gives you needed leverage when it comes time to negotiate a great price at the dealer.
  • Negotiate from the cost up and not MSRP down.
  • Use the top online price services to save time and money – read our review for:

New Car Prices:

Helpful Pricing Resources and Guides:

  • Dealer Cost Calculator – True dealer cost is a must know when buying new cars. This will calculate dealer cost of any new car.
  • How to Buy New Cars Below Dealer Invoice Prices – Save Thousands on your next new car.
  • New Car Dealer Cost – A complete explanation of what it is and why you need to know the true dealer cost.

It pays to be educated when buying a car. Before you dig into doing any serious research, you should familiarize yourself with some of the most common car pricing terms. Without understand what they mean, you’ll have a tough time clicking your way to the best information. Definitions for a few of the best ones are highlighted below.

Must Know New Car Price Terms:

MSRP refers to manufacturer’s suggested retail price. It is the published amount that a car manufacturer advises dealers to charge. Of course, the MSRP is merely the starting point in negotiations at the dealership. In fact, many people disregard MSRP altogether while negotiating.

The MSRP, or sticker price, is typically listed on the spec sheet that’s affixed to a new car. In some instances, it’s not listed at all. Dealers sometimes omit the MSRP when a car is especially in demand. By not advertising the MSRP, the dealer may be able to start negotiations at a higher amount.

It should be noted that MSRP does not reflect the “out the door” amount that you should expect to pay. It doesn’t include registration, taxes, destination charges or other fees. Although MSRPs are ostensibly used to protect consumers, they are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to getting a great price on a vehicle.

Dealer Invoice Price – The invoice price of a new vehicle is the price on an invoice the manufacturer sends a dealer when they acquire a vehicle. many people believe that this is the true dealer cost of the vehicle, but in many cases – it is not, Invoice prices have hidden profit built into them such as dealer holdback and manufacturer to dealer incentives. (See below.)

Dealer Holdback – Dealer holdback reflects a percentage of the MSRP or invoice price that is paid back to a dealer by the manufacturer. Manufacturers usually pay this withheld amount back quarterly, but practices do vary. Holdbacks came into widespread use a few years ago. They are used to improve dealer profits by inflating invoice prices. They primarily do that by reducing the gross profit of a sale. In turn, the salesperson who was involved in the transaction earns a lower commission.

Another reason that dealer holdbacks, which are usually about two to three percent of the MSRP, are so popular is because they allow dealers to offer special deals while still earning handsome profits. Dealers can legitimately say they are offering vehicles at invoice prices but recoup hundreds of dollars later.

While it’s beneficial to be aware of dealer holdbacks, you probably won’t have much luck using them during your negotiations. It’s smart to know they exist, but dealers hold tightly to them. You can use them in a roundabout way to negotiate a lower price.

Dealer Incentives – Dealer incentives are often referred to as factory-to-dealer incentives. They reduce the dealer’s true cost to buy a vehicle. In some instances, those savings may be passed along to consumers. Dealer incentives are often offered on a regional basis in order to bolster sales for a specific model. Other times, they are used to reward dealers who reach a certain sales target.

Dealers are not required to pass these incentives on to consumers. If you can track down specific information about a current dealer incentive that’s not being passed on to buyers, it may give you the leverage you need to get a better price. However, because these incentives often vary by region, it isn’t always easy to pin them down successfully. It never hurts to keep your eyes peeled though.

Regional Ad Fees – In the vast majority of cases, regional ad fees are not negotiable. That’s because they are usually itemized on dealer invoices, and they are a firm part of a dealer’s cost. They are the way in which manufacturers recoup some of the expense of promoting and marketing specific models. When these fees appear on a dealer invoice, you can bet your bottom dollar that they will be on your sales contract too.

In some cases, however, the dealer invoice doesn’t include these fees. If it doesn’t, but they appear on your sales contract, you may have some wiggle room. It all depends on the specific dealer and on the amount that you are paying. Before you head to the dealership, go online to consult the many lists that outline regional advertising fees by manufacturer. They can help you get a better grasp about how much these fees come into play.

Destination Fees – To arrive on dealer lots, new cars have to be transported from automobile manufacturing plants. The expense of doing so is charged to the dealer by the manufacturer, who then passes it along to the consumer. The total amount is usually several hundreds of dollars. As nice as it would be to somehow negotiate away these fees, it simply isn’t possible. The amount differs depending on the model and the manufacturer, but it has nothing to do with how far the vehicle had to be transported.

Manufacturer Incentives and Rebates – Three of the most popular manufacturer rebates and incentives are designed to be passed along to consumers. Low-interest financing, cash rebates and special leases are all offered from time to time to stimulate sales. Sometimes, they are offered as first-time buyer specials, employee discounts, military discounts and other incentives.

These incentives reduce the net price of the vehicle. You can use an online calculator to determine whether a cash rebate, which can be applied as a down payment, or low-interest financing is better.

Now that these terms have been demystified, you should have a much easier time conducting research before buying the vehicle that you want.

True Dealer Cost:

The Dealer Costs Formula:

Invoice Price – Holdback – Rebates Incentives (If any)= Dealer Cost

Take the Invoice price and subtract the holdback. (Percentages Below). Take this amount and subtract any manufacturer rebates. To get the rebates simply fill in a price quote from one of the recommended services listed – you will receive the rebate you are entitled to in your area. (If Any)

Holdback Calculations:

  • If a % of “Total” MSRP or Invoice make sure you add all the manufacturers options to the price when calculating holdback
  • If a % of “Base” MSRP or Invoice, calculate hold back on the Base price before you add the options

Note: The price guides above do not include state taxes, license fees, or manufacturers Rebates. To calculate your on the road price, add you state taxes and License fee – then subtract your manufacturer rebate if any.

A note about rebates: Most rebates are subtracted from the “on the road” figure. In most cases, you can have the rebate if you are arranging your own financing or you are paying cash. If you decide to use the manufacturer’s low interest financing, you do not usually get the rebate. Ask your dealer for details.