Ssae 16 Type Ii #is #ssae #16 #needed,reports,reviewing #ssae #16,ssae #16,ssae #16 #audit #review,ssae #16 #review,ssae #16 #review #checklist,ssae #16 #reviews,ssae #review,ssae #reviews,ssae-18,ssae16,ssae16 #review,standards,third #party #ssae #guidance #review,who #is #required #to #have #a #ssae #16,who #is #required #to #have #ssae #16,why #get #ssae #16,audit #intensedebate,leave #a #reply: #name #(required): #website: #comments: #submit, #moderation,\’leave #a #reply\’ #\’name #(required)\’ #\’mail #(will #not #be #published) #(required)\’ #\’website\’ #it #services,controls,how #do #you #prepare #for #an #ssae #16 #audit,how #to #prepare #for #a #ssae #16,how #to #prepare #for #an #ssae #16 #audit,new #avenues #for #ssae #16,preparing #for #a #ssae #16,preparing #for #ssae #16,report #writing,ssae #16 #audit #preparation,ssae #16 #consulting #do #we #need,ssae #16 #preparation,ssae #16 #report,ssae #no. #16,example #soc #1 #report,soc #1,soc #1 #report,soc #1 #reports,soc #1 #type #2,soc #1 #type #2 #report,soc #1 #type #ii #report,soc #2,soc #3,soc #i,soc #report,soc #reporting,soc #type,soc #type #1 #report,soc-1 #report,soc1,soc1 #report,soc1 #reporting,soc1 #soc2,ssae #16 #reports,ssae #16 #soc #1,ssae16 #compliant #soc #1,system #and #organization #control #report,what #is #a #soc #1 #report,what #is #a #soc1 #report,what #is #ssae #16 #soc #1 #and #soc #2 #difference,at-c #320,cost,definition #soc #1 #ssae #16,how #ssea #16 #helps #auditors,prices,pricing,soc #1 #audit,ssae #16 #audit,ssae #16 #audit #checklist,ssae #16 #audit #report,ssae #16 #audit #requirements,ssae #16 #auditing #standard,ssae #16 #auditor,ssae #16 #checklist,ssae #16 #cost,ssae #16 #costs,ssae #16 #prices,ssae #17 #audit,ssae #18 #report,ssae #soc #auditing #and #reporting,ssae16 #audit,ssae16 #audit #report,ssae16 #checkilst,what #is #a #ssae #16 #audit,what #is #ssae #16 #audit,what #is #ssae16 #audit,what #is #the #purpose #of #a #ssae #16 #audit?


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The SSAE 18 Reporting Standard SOC 1 SOC 2 SOC 3 Support and Guidance for SSAE18, SOC 1, SOC 2, and SOC 3 reporting standards

Some organizations have heard of SAS 70, SSAE 16. and soon to be SSAE 18. but, don t really know WHY they need to pay to have a bunch of auditors trounce through their company for a month or two during the year, especially right after their financial audit just finished.
The answer is simple: Many companies will not even think about using your company to perform services for them without a clean Type II Report in place.
Some benefits of having an SSAE 16 performed :

  • Ability to perform outsourcing services for Public Companies.
    • If performing financially significant duties for a Public Company, they are required to use a SSAE 16 qualified provider as it is the only way to give investors assurance over controls that are not performed by the Company in question.
  • Public and Private companies are more likely to trust your organization with their data.
    • If you were to trust a company with your data, you would want complete assurance it will be handled with the utmost care
  • A year round accessible knowledge source (your auditors).
    • As a service organization, large or small, you will always have questions regarding your business and having a set of auditors in place with access to a wide array of business knowledge, it will allow you to bounce your questions and concerns off of a group of trusted individuals.
  • A third party to review your controls and activities to ensure they are functioning appropriately, and give advice on how to improve upon them.
    • Sometimes your internal audit department is good, but, not always as stringent as they should be. This will help to serve as a check on their work, as well as your staff. Additionally, if there were any findings noted, your auditors are in a great position to give you some tricks and tips to improve to ensure everything functions well the following period.
  • Improving performance of the organization.
    • Just the knowledge that a review is being performed of an employee s work that can have far reaching consequences for the company as a whole. No more, Oh, I didn t realize that reviewing user access was THAT important to do this month, sorry , now, everyone knows that if it s not done, the success or failure of the organization could rest upon them.

Think of the SSAE 16 or SSAE-18 audit as an annual investment into your company, increasing potential new clients. productivity and accountability .

This tip is focused on designing controls that reflect the process being testing, if they don t, a headache of massive proportions will be created once testing begins.
What do you do to make sure you don t screw this up? Have as many meetings as it takes to get it right.
What you need to do is sit down with the auditors, the department lead, the main employees responsible for performing the process, and anyone else whom could either play a role in testing or modifying the control in the future. Once that is done, Management should discuss what they determined the control to be and how it should operate, that is then reviewed by the auditors, and then the employees performing the tasks should be reconsulted to verify that the control still reflects their process accurately.
Many times people try to speed this process up and half-ass it, leaving many open items which upon testing could easily blow up into a huge problem. When the control isn t 100% agreed upon prior to testing and a deviation is noted, it s a tough call between failing the control and the ability to adjust it to accurately reflect the process. The problem is modifying a control after testing has begun is not proper and needs to be avoided at all costs.
Locking the controls locked down early on could save weeks in wrapping up your new SSAE 16 Report.
We have seen issues like this cause delays in issuing of the report to the client and running additional fees, since adjusting controls isn t free. Coming from the perspective of the auditor, we can let you know the pitfalls, consequences and how to best navigate the audit process. If you have any comments or questions please leave them below!

A SOC 1 Report (System and Organization Controls Report ) is a report on Controls at a Service Organization which are relevant to user entities’ internal control over financial reporting. The SOC1 Report is what you would have previously considered to be the standard SAS70, complete with a Type I and Type II reports, but falls under the SSAE 16 guidance (and soon to be SSAE 18 ).

Please see the following articles discussing the SSAE 16 guidance and additional information related to the SOC 1 (Type I and Type II) Reports:

In addition to the SOC 1 report which is restricted to controls relevant to an audit of a user entity’s financial statements, the SOC 2 and SOC 3 reports have been created to address controls relevant to operations and compliance and will be discussed in further detail in the future.

Please see the SOC 1 Reporting Guide page for additional information.

SSAE 16 is an enhancement to the current standard for Reporting on Controls at a Service Organization, the SAS70. The changes made to the standard will bring your company, and the rest of the companies in the US, up to date with new international service organization reporting standards, the ISAE 3402. The adjustments made from SAS 70 to SSAE 16 will help you and your counterparts in the US compete on an international level; allowing companies around the world to give you their business with complete confidence .

SSAE16 is now effective as of June 15, 2011, and if you have not made the necessary adjustments required, now is the time to find a quality provider to discuss the proper steps. All organizations are now required to issue their Service Auditor Reports under the SSAE 16 standards in an SOC 1 Report.

The soon to be effective, SSAE-18. is expected to follow a similar reporting structure to the SSAE-16 within a SOC 1 report.

Who Needs an SSAE 16 (SOC 1 ) Audit?

If your Company (the Service Organization ) performs outsourced services that affect the financial statements of another Company (the User Organization ), you will more than likely be asked to provide an SSAE16 Type II Report, especially if the User Organization is publicly traded.
Some example industries include:

  • Payroll Processing
  • Loan Servicing
  • Data Center /Co-Location/Network Monitoring Services
  • Software as a Service (SaaS )
  • Medical Claims Processors

What you Need to Know:

Before starting the SSAE 16 process, there are a number of considerations one must take into account that can save considerable time, effort, and money in the long run. Use the following items as a mini checklist for yourself:

  • Does my Company need an SSAE16, or, are we doing it just because someone asked?
  • Reports on the low end can run at least $15,000 a year, will the business lost be less of a burden than the cost of the report itself?
  • Does your company have defined Business Process and IT controls in place, or, will you need assistance developing and implementing them (readiness assessment)?
  • Have you determined the controls in place which affect the outsourced services being provided?
  • Have key stakeholders been defined and included in discussions?

There are many other issues to consider before engaging a CPA firm to help with your SSAE 16, for a more detailed checklist please see The SSAE 16 Checklist

You may have heard SSAE-18 is on the horizon for reports issued as of May 1, 2017. There are some important updates discussed in here: SSAE-18 An Update to SSAE-16 .

As the standard is formalized and the date approaches we will continue to provide more information to help you prepare for these changes.


O – Reilly Auto Parts to Leave the – Alliance – and O – Reilly #auto #anything


#orileys auto
#

O Reilly Auto Parts to Leave the Alliance and O Reilly

Announces New Parts City Auto Parts Jobber Program

SPRINGFIELD, Mo.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–June 04, 2007 O Reilly Auto Parts ( O Reilly ) (NASDAQ: ORLY) and the Aftermarket Auto Parts Alliance ( Alliance ) announce with great regret that after almost 30 years of affiliation O Reilly will be terminating its shareholder status effective 12/31/07.

David O Reilly, Chairman of O Reilly Auto Parts, and longtime board member of the Alliance, stated: This is a very tough decision for our company. We have many great memories and relationships in the Alliance. We have benefited in countless ways through our association with some of the very best operators in the business. Our company has reached a point where it has become very difficult for us to maintain product line compliance which is the core driver of the association s effectiveness.

Dick Morgan, president of the Alliance, stated: We certainly hate to see the O Reilly s leave our association. They have been a part of Auto Value, and then the Alliance, for almost 30 years. The separation is on a completely amiable and mutual basis, and it simply represents their need to do what is in the interest of their shareholders, and for the Alliance to continue its strong commitment to our vendors with regard to product conformity by our shareholders.

With regard to the independent jobber marketing programs, which O Reilly has over 200 locations affiliated with, O Reilly CEO Greg Henslee states: We regret having to move on from the Auto Value/Bumper to Bumper affiliation, but are announcing at this time a new jobber marketing program for all of our independent jobbers. It will be called Parts City Auto Parts and will have strong ties to the O Reilly Auto Parts programs, advertising and appearance. We are very excited to use this change as an opportunity to strengthen our direct relationship with our jobbers, and to offer them a closer tie to the O Reilly concept of selling auto parts.

COO of O Reilly, Ted Wise, said that the plans are to introduce the entire program to the jobbers within the next two weeks and we plan to have the entire system converted by year end. This will include new signage, interior decor package, installer programs, and the whole gamut. We believe that once our jobber customers hear the full scope and strength of the program that they will also be very excited about the future potential of this new opportunity.

O Reilly Automotive, Inc. is one of the largest specialty retailers of automotive aftermarket parts, tools, supplies, equipment and accessories in the United States, serving both the do-it-yourself and professional installer markets. Founded in 1957 by the O Reilly family, the Company operated 1,687 stores in the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming as of March 31, 2007.

The Company claims the protection of the safe-harbor for forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements can be identified by forward-looking words such as expect, believe, anticipate, should, plan, intend, estimate, project, will or similar words. In addition, statements contained within this press release that are not historical facts are forward-looking statements, such as statements discussing among other things, expected growth, store development and expansion strategy, business strategies, future revenues and future performance. These forward-looking statements are based on estimates, projections, beliefs and assumptions and are not guarantees of future events and results. Such statements are subject to risks, uncertainties and assumptions, including, but not limited to, competition, product demand, the market for auto parts, the economy in general, inflation, consumer debt levels, governmental approvals, our ability to hire and retain qualified employees, risks associated with the integration of acquired businesses, weather, terrorist activities, war and the threat of war. Actual results may materially differ from anticipated results described or implied in these forward-looking statements. Please refer to the Risk Factors sections of the Company s Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2005, for more details.

CONTACT: O Reilly Automotive, Inc. Greg Henslee, 417-862-3333 or Tom McFall, 417-862-3333


Suzuki cars leave the US. So should you buy one? #kings #auto #mall


#suzuki auto
#

By John Voelcker. Guest blogger November 11, 2012

There’s nothing like a bargain price on a brand-new car.

And since Suzuki  has announced that it’ll stop selling cars in the U.S.. there are bargains galore on new Suzuki models.

It also depends on whether your local Suzuki dealer plans to stick around for a few years to service the cars, or whether it plans to close its Suzuki business and transfer warranty claims work to another dealer somewhere further away.

But, first, the purchase price on that new Suzuki–which likely just got lower.

As the case of Saab just this past January showed, dealers may offer 25 percent or more off the new-car sticker price  when a brand pulls out of the market.

The tactic worked, too: An Ohio Saab dealer sold 55 of its 122 new cars  in one week by slashing prices 25 to 45 percent.

We know of a Detroit buyer who was able to get $4,000 off the $20,399 price of a brand-new 2013 Suzuki SX4  with all-wheel drive and the value package that includes a navigation system. He closed that sale yesterday.

Unlike Saab, however, Japanese carmaker Suzuki isn’t defunct, however; only its U.S. unit declared bankruptcy.

That means that not only will parts continue to be available, but that warranties on existing Suzukis will continue to be honored, and parts availability shouldn’t be a problem.

When Saab declared bankruptcy last December after several failed sale attempts, its dealers were left without warranties on their brand-new cars–and had to sell them that way.

That Ohio Saab dealer created a $1,995 service contract for 60,000 miles to substitute for the defunct factory warranty.

Suzuki dealers won’t have to do that, and owners shouldn’t see any change in warranty coverage.

But it’s entirely possible that Suzuki buyers will have to travel further to get their cars serviced, if their local dealer shuts down its Suzuki service business before the warranty ends.

As for parts, because Suzuki is a global automaker and will continue to supply replacement components for its cars elsewhere in the world, service parts shouldn’t be a problem.

That ensures that owners (and former Suzuki dealers) can at least get the parts that independent service mechanics need to keep their cars on the road.

In June, the parts-making piece of Saab (which wasn’t part of the bankrupt carmaker) set up a new U.S. company that will continue to sell parts for Saabs .

Another factor to consider: Potential buyers should check carefully with their financial institutions if they don’t plan on getting a purchase loan through the dealership.

Some banks have more restrictive policies about writing loans for new cars from dead automakers.

Other defunct brands include not only Saab, but also Saturn. Pontiac, HUMMER, Oldsmobile. Plymouth, Isuzu. Daihatsu. and more.

In the end, buyers should consider not only whether a new Suzuki represents value for money, but whether it’s a car they really want to drive and live with for several years.

Except for the Kizashi sport sedan–larger than a compact, but smaller than a mid-size–Suzuki’s lineup of cars and crossovers  is now old and not particularly refined.

The SX4 hatchback  offered a model that was the lowest-priced all-wheel drive car sold in the U.S. but it and the sister sedan model are now in their seventh model year.

Similarly, the Grand Vitara is aging and uncompetitive on equipment.

And most Suzuki models have lower EPA gas-mileage ratings than competing cars from other makers.

So if you like the price you can get on a new Suzuki, make sure you like the car.

Then weigh the risks carefully. and quiz your dealership about its future plans.


O – Reilly Auto Parts to Leave the – Alliance – and O – Reilly #used #car #search #engine


#orileys auto
#

O Reilly Auto Parts to Leave the Alliance and O Reilly

Announces New Parts City Auto Parts Jobber Program

SPRINGFIELD, Mo.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–June 04, 2007 O Reilly Auto Parts ( O Reilly ) (NASDAQ: ORLY) and the Aftermarket Auto Parts Alliance ( Alliance ) announce with great regret that after almost 30 years of affiliation O Reilly will be terminating its shareholder status effective 12/31/07.

David O Reilly, Chairman of O Reilly Auto Parts, and longtime board member of the Alliance, stated: This is a very tough decision for our company. We have many great memories and relationships in the Alliance. We have benefited in countless ways through our association with some of the very best operators in the business. Our company has reached a point where it has become very difficult for us to maintain product line compliance which is the core driver of the association s effectiveness.

Dick Morgan, president of the Alliance, stated: We certainly hate to see the O Reilly s leave our association. They have been a part of Auto Value, and then the Alliance, for almost 30 years. The separation is on a completely amiable and mutual basis, and it simply represents their need to do what is in the interest of their shareholders, and for the Alliance to continue its strong commitment to our vendors with regard to product conformity by our shareholders.

With regard to the independent jobber marketing programs, which O Reilly has over 200 locations affiliated with, O Reilly CEO Greg Henslee states: We regret having to move on from the Auto Value/Bumper to Bumper affiliation, but are announcing at this time a new jobber marketing program for all of our independent jobbers. It will be called Parts City Auto Parts and will have strong ties to the O Reilly Auto Parts programs, advertising and appearance. We are very excited to use this change as an opportunity to strengthen our direct relationship with our jobbers, and to offer them a closer tie to the O Reilly concept of selling auto parts.

COO of O Reilly, Ted Wise, said that the plans are to introduce the entire program to the jobbers within the next two weeks and we plan to have the entire system converted by year end. This will include new signage, interior decor package, installer programs, and the whole gamut. We believe that once our jobber customers hear the full scope and strength of the program that they will also be very excited about the future potential of this new opportunity.

O Reilly Automotive, Inc. is one of the largest specialty retailers of automotive aftermarket parts, tools, supplies, equipment and accessories in the United States, serving both the do-it-yourself and professional installer markets. Founded in 1957 by the O Reilly family, the Company operated 1,687 stores in the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming as of March 31, 2007.

The Company claims the protection of the safe-harbor for forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements can be identified by forward-looking words such as expect, believe, anticipate, should, plan, intend, estimate, project, will or similar words. In addition, statements contained within this press release that are not historical facts are forward-looking statements, such as statements discussing among other things, expected growth, store development and expansion strategy, business strategies, future revenues and future performance. These forward-looking statements are based on estimates, projections, beliefs and assumptions and are not guarantees of future events and results. Such statements are subject to risks, uncertainties and assumptions, including, but not limited to, competition, product demand, the market for auto parts, the economy in general, inflation, consumer debt levels, governmental approvals, our ability to hire and retain qualified employees, risks associated with the integration of acquired businesses, weather, terrorist activities, war and the threat of war. Actual results may materially differ from anticipated results described or implied in these forward-looking statements. Please refer to the Risk Factors sections of the Company s Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2005, for more details.

CONTACT: O Reilly Automotive, Inc. Greg Henslee, 417-862-3333 or Tom McFall, 417-862-3333


O – Reilly Auto Parts to Leave the – Alliance – and O – Reilly


#orileys auto
#

O Reilly Auto Parts to Leave the Alliance and O Reilly

Announces New Parts City Auto Parts Jobber Program

SPRINGFIELD, Mo.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–June 04, 2007 O Reilly Auto Parts ( O Reilly ) (NASDAQ: ORLY) and the Aftermarket Auto Parts Alliance ( Alliance ) announce with great regret that after almost 30 years of affiliation O Reilly will be terminating its shareholder status effective 12/31/07.

David O Reilly, Chairman of O Reilly Auto Parts, and longtime board member of the Alliance, stated: This is a very tough decision for our company. We have many great memories and relationships in the Alliance. We have benefited in countless ways through our association with some of the very best operators in the business. Our company has reached a point where it has become very difficult for us to maintain product line compliance which is the core driver of the association s effectiveness.

Dick Morgan, president of the Alliance, stated: We certainly hate to see the O Reilly s leave our association. They have been a part of Auto Value, and then the Alliance, for almost 30 years. The separation is on a completely amiable and mutual basis, and it simply represents their need to do what is in the interest of their shareholders, and for the Alliance to continue its strong commitment to our vendors with regard to product conformity by our shareholders.

With regard to the independent jobber marketing programs, which O Reilly has over 200 locations affiliated with, O Reilly CEO Greg Henslee states: We regret having to move on from the Auto Value/Bumper to Bumper affiliation, but are announcing at this time a new jobber marketing program for all of our independent jobbers. It will be called Parts City Auto Parts and will have strong ties to the O Reilly Auto Parts programs, advertising and appearance. We are very excited to use this change as an opportunity to strengthen our direct relationship with our jobbers, and to offer them a closer tie to the O Reilly concept of selling auto parts.

COO of O Reilly, Ted Wise, said that the plans are to introduce the entire program to the jobbers within the next two weeks and we plan to have the entire system converted by year end. This will include new signage, interior decor package, installer programs, and the whole gamut. We believe that once our jobber customers hear the full scope and strength of the program that they will also be very excited about the future potential of this new opportunity.

O Reilly Automotive, Inc. is one of the largest specialty retailers of automotive aftermarket parts, tools, supplies, equipment and accessories in the United States, serving both the do-it-yourself and professional installer markets. Founded in 1957 by the O Reilly family, the Company operated 1,687 stores in the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming as of March 31, 2007.

The Company claims the protection of the safe-harbor for forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements can be identified by forward-looking words such as expect, believe, anticipate, should, plan, intend, estimate, project, will or similar words. In addition, statements contained within this press release that are not historical facts are forward-looking statements, such as statements discussing among other things, expected growth, store development and expansion strategy, business strategies, future revenues and future performance. These forward-looking statements are based on estimates, projections, beliefs and assumptions and are not guarantees of future events and results. Such statements are subject to risks, uncertainties and assumptions, including, but not limited to, competition, product demand, the market for auto parts, the economy in general, inflation, consumer debt levels, governmental approvals, our ability to hire and retain qualified employees, risks associated with the integration of acquired businesses, weather, terrorist activities, war and the threat of war. Actual results may materially differ from anticipated results described or implied in these forward-looking statements. Please refer to the Risk Factors sections of the Company s Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2005, for more details.

CONTACT: O Reilly Automotive, Inc. Greg Henslee, 417-862-3333 or Tom McFall, 417-862-3333


Suzuki cars leave the US. So should you buy one?


#suzuki auto
#

By John Voelcker. Guest blogger November 11, 2012

There’s nothing like a bargain price on a brand-new car.

And since Suzuki  has announced that it’ll stop selling cars in the U.S.. there are bargains galore on new Suzuki models.

It also depends on whether your local Suzuki dealer plans to stick around for a few years to service the cars, or whether it plans to close its Suzuki business and transfer warranty claims work to another dealer somewhere further away.

But, first, the purchase price on that new Suzuki–which likely just got lower.

As the case of Saab just this past January showed, dealers may offer 25 percent or more off the new-car sticker price  when a brand pulls out of the market.

The tactic worked, too: An Ohio Saab dealer sold 55 of its 122 new cars  in one week by slashing prices 25 to 45 percent.

We know of a Detroit buyer who was able to get $4,000 off the $20,399 price of a brand-new 2013 Suzuki SX4  with all-wheel drive and the value package that includes a navigation system. He closed that sale yesterday.

Unlike Saab, however, Japanese carmaker Suzuki isn’t defunct, however; only its U.S. unit declared bankruptcy.

That means that not only will parts continue to be available, but that warranties on existing Suzukis will continue to be honored, and parts availability shouldn’t be a problem.

When Saab declared bankruptcy last December after several failed sale attempts, its dealers were left without warranties on their brand-new cars–and had to sell them that way.

That Ohio Saab dealer created a $1,995 service contract for 60,000 miles to substitute for the defunct factory warranty.

Suzuki dealers won’t have to do that, and owners shouldn’t see any change in warranty coverage.

But it’s entirely possible that Suzuki buyers will have to travel further to get their cars serviced, if their local dealer shuts down its Suzuki service business before the warranty ends.

As for parts, because Suzuki is a global automaker and will continue to supply replacement components for its cars elsewhere in the world, service parts shouldn’t be a problem.

That ensures that owners (and former Suzuki dealers) can at least get the parts that independent service mechanics need to keep their cars on the road.

In June, the parts-making piece of Saab (which wasn’t part of the bankrupt carmaker) set up a new U.S. company that will continue to sell parts for Saabs .

Another factor to consider: Potential buyers should check carefully with their financial institutions if they don’t plan on getting a purchase loan through the dealership.

Some banks have more restrictive policies about writing loans for new cars from dead automakers.

Other defunct brands include not only Saab, but also Saturn. Pontiac, HUMMER, Oldsmobile. Plymouth, Isuzu. Daihatsu. and more.

In the end, buyers should consider not only whether a new Suzuki represents value for money, but whether it’s a car they really want to drive and live with for several years.

Except for the Kizashi sport sedan–larger than a compact, but smaller than a mid-size–Suzuki’s lineup of cars and crossovers  is now old and not particularly refined.

The SX4 hatchback  offered a model that was the lowest-priced all-wheel drive car sold in the U.S. but it and the sister sedan model are now in their seventh model year.

Similarly, the Grand Vitara is aging and uncompetitive on equipment.

And most Suzuki models have lower EPA gas-mileage ratings than competing cars from other makers.

So if you like the price you can get on a new Suzuki, make sure you like the car.

Then weigh the risks carefully. and quiz your dealership about its future plans.