What – s the Right New Vehicle for Me? Feature – Car and Driver #auto #italia


#car finder
#

What s the Right New Vehicle for Me?

With so many cars on the market, one is perfect for you. But which of the more than 400 choices is it?

Feature

When Car and Driver editors buy cars, emotion often trumps logic. We love performance, so practicality isn t a major consideration. But for many buyers, a car is a rational choice; they buy what they need to transport themselves and their loved ones as safely, comfortably, and cheaply as possible. It s a smarter way to buy, but it isn t any easier. With more than 400 new cars to choose from, how do you pick the right one?

Start by considering a series of questions, but beware: Once you find the car that fulfills your every need, an emotional connection may well form whether you like it or not.

What Kind of Car Do I Need?

Forget the number of models available, the number of body styles alone can be overwhelming: coupes, sedans, station wagons, crossovers, SUVs. How do you decide what you need?

Coupe/ Convertible : If you want a car that makes a statement about you, coupes and convertibles are typically the most expressive designs, but restricted access to the back seat (if the car you are considering even has one) seriously limits their practicality.

Sedan : If there are kids in the picture or in the near-future plan, four doors are a likely requirement. Even if children are small enough to ride comfortably in the back seat of a coupe with any regularity, consider the difficulty of constantly climbing into and out of the back seat to tend to a child before committing to just two doors.

Hatchback : If you add another door bringing the total to five you re looking at hatchbacks and station wagons, which offer SUV-like space without the dynamic and fuel-economy compromises of heavier vehicles. These cars are pariahs in the U.S. market, but many buyers are starting to reconsider, as fluctuating fuel prices and increasing environmental awareness have them thinking twice about crossovers and SUVs. As manufacturers get increasingly creative and design ever more stylish hatchbacks their roofs are sleeker than wagons the market is warming to the segment.

Station Wagon : Station wagons have perhaps the worst reputation of any body style on the market, but we re fighting to change that. They offer the best attributes of a car without the trade-offs of larger crossovers and SUVs. The Mazda 6 wagon actually had more passenger and cargo volume than the Mazda CX-7 crossover, was quicker, and got better fuel economy. It was so immensely unpopular that it was discontinued last year, and a forthcoming CX-7 promises a weaker engine in an effort to reduce fuel consumption.

SUV/Crossover : Jack up the ground clearance of a hatchback or station wagon, and you have a crossover or an SUV. Do you need that ground clearance? Probably not. When was the last time your road didn t get regularly plowed or cleared? Sure, it happens most often to those of us in the northern part of the country, and that s a few times a winter but the fuel-economy penalty of opting for a taller and heavier vehicle is something that affects you every time you start the car.

Of course, the higher seating position of a crossover or SUV is something many people enjoy, for its increased visibility and for the ease of entry and exit as the seat is at a more natural height. But keep in mind that height adds weight, and weight diminishes fuel economy and stability.

Those who tow regularly already know they need something with that capability. But if you need a truck only to tow a few times a year, perhaps renting in those instances is a better alternative to living year round with the fuel-economy penalties of a truck.

Minivan : Those with large families or dreams of such often resist the practicality of the van, but if you routinely haul five or more people, there is no vehicle short of a school bus that will better accommodate six, seven, or eight passengers. A jumbo SUV like a Chevrolet Suburban or Ford Expedition EL has more cargo space, but passengers will find greater comfort in a minivan. A minivan is the perfect family vehicle but normally does without any semblance of soul. A couple of notable exceptions are the Honda Odyssey and the Mazda 5. both of which manage to add an element of driving pleasure to the normally bland family-hauler character.

What Size Car Do I Need?

We say start small. And right off the bat, let s debunk a common myth: Larger vehicles are safer than smaller ones. The safest collision is one you avoid in the first place. Lighter cars are typically more agile and give you a better chance of steering away from a crash rather than gripping the wheel, barreling in, and letting physics punish the other driver.

Before the inevitable If I m going to get T-boned by an idiot in a Navigator, I d rather be in a Silverado than a Mini response, consider that a shorter stopping distance might allow you to come to a complete stop before either car in that scenario ever enters the intersection. Small cars tend to cost less to buy and consume less fuel, too. Driving a smaller, more frugal car makes you look enlightened at least in college towns and northern California.

Also, consider that small cars don t have to be small inside. Thanks to the Manhattan approach of building up instead of out, small cars keep getting more and more spacious. The smallest car currently available in the U.S. is the Smart Fortwo. and it offers headroom within an inch of what you d find in a Cadillac Escalade. Or consider the Nissan Cube. Despite being nearly three feet shorter than the Honda Pilot and weighing almost a ton less, it has more head- and legroom in the front seat, more headroom in the back seat, and only three inches less legroom in the rear. If it s interior space you need, you needn t buy big.

Do I Need All-Wheel Drive?

Probably not. All-wheel drive is seen as a safety feature in wintry climes, but the only difference the average driver will notice with all-wheel drive is the added traction when accelerating. All-wheel drive doesn t increase a vehicle s ability to stop or turn. What most buyers don t realize is just how much difference a set of winter tires can make. And they are cheaper than upgrading to an all-wheel-drive car and won t have the year-round negative impact on your fuel economy that comes with a car having to drive all four wheels all the time.

While we re on the subject, weight does not automatically make a better winter vehicle. Heavy cars and trucks do plow through deep snow better and behave more predictably, but hit a patch of ice, and that weight is just extra momentum to try to control. Again, bigger is not necessarily better.

How Much Power Do I Need?

In our road tests, we always cite 0-to-60-mph times, but the fact is that very few people ever actually use full throttle. Around Ann Arbor, we see more drivers who fear full throttle than those who ever use it. Truck buyers who tow and haul heavy loads need lots of power, but the average car buyer doesn t need any more than is necessary to keep him or her comfortable on a test drive. The buying practice of getting the bigger engine but never using more than half-throttle is like building a four-story house but leaving the top two floors vacant. All else being equal, larger engines use more fuel.

The type of driving you do determines whether or not a hybrid or a diesel makes sense for you. Hybrids tend to use less fuel around town, when low speeds and frequent braking keep them running on battery power longer. Diesel drivers will see their greatest benefits on the highway, although diesel vehicles are more efficient than gasoline cars at low speeds, too.

Either approach will extend your fuel dollar, but be aware of the premiums you ll be paying up front and the distance you ll have to drive to recoup your costs. Of course, that doesn t necessarily have to be a deterrent if you know you ll drive a car more than 60,000 or 100,000 miles, or if you buy a fuel miser on principle.

With a diesel, also be aware of the premium you ll pay for fuel. As this is written, diesel is outpacing gasoline in the U.S. by only about 10 cents per gallon, or five percent a much lower differential than we have seen in the past year. So right now, the 25-to-30-percent benefit most drivers will realize in fuel economy is worth it. But that can change quickly as fuel prices fluctuate.

Could You Please Be More Specific?

For our top choices in every segment the cars we would buy if we were in the market today see our Editors Choice page. Or check out our annual 10Best list of the 10 outstanding cars across all market segments.


10 Tips for a Successful Car-Buying Experience on Craigslist – Feature – Car and Driver #auto #wheels


#buy used cars online
#

10 Tips for a Successful Car-Buying Experience on Craigslist

The vehicle listings on Craigslist are often light on graphics and always free of oversight, and cruising them can be an eye-opening experience. Usable at no cost for most sellers, half-truths are plentiful in the listings and vehicle histories rare, leaving it to you to connect the dots. (Very few people take our advice for selling a car online .) Yet Craigslist can be a highly effective tool for locating the car of your dreams. Here are 10 tips that should help you separate fact from fiction and satisfied with your purchase:

1. Hone your search. Craigslist allows users to configure their search results to include dealers, private sellers, or both. If a warranty, certified pre-owned status, or convenience is high on your list of priorities, you’ll want to restrict yourself to dealer listings, as there’s no reason to waste time scrolling through pages of clapped out Fox-body Mustangs and worn-out work trucks. On the other hand, if driving for two-hours to look at rust-ravaged, Vietnam-era forward control Jeep that “ran when parked” is your thing, you already know the drill: private sellers all the way. Still, the “both” setting can be handy when looking for a nice commuter car or winter beater, as sometimes dealers will offer such things, although that practice is becoming less common.

If you know exactly which vehicle you want and how much you’re willing to pay, CL offers the option of plugging those criteria in right at the top of your search. Doing so will narrow the offerings accordingly, facilitating a focused search and a rational purchase with a minimum of drama. (To cast a wider net, you can also use one of the many sites that allow you to search every local Craigslist across the country.) Of course, one could argue that a life that doesn’t include at least one late-night back-alley transaction involving a sagging Ford Torino, small farm animals, and some class-C fireworks isn’t really a life worth living.

2. Size up the seller. It’s true you can’t judge a book by its cover, but the type contained within can be quite revealing. If an ad is composed in ALL CAPS and is accompanied by a couple of grainy images that resemble lo-res screengrabs from the Zapruder film, you’re probably in for a rough ride. Likewise, certain sellers like to spice up their ad with buzzwords and phrases like “air blows cold” and “stops on a dime,” which are actually thinly veiled code words for, “if [insert name of component or system in question] is still working when you buy it, it likely won’t be by the time you get the car home.” Bottom line: Judge the vehicle on it’s own merits and don’t believe the hype.

3. Call first. Get as much information about the vehicle as you can on the phone—and always ask if more photos are available or can be taken, especially of problem areas—and try to pick up on the seller’s character. Do they sound composed or sketchy? Engaged or disinterested? There’s nothing worse than carving an hour out of your busy schedule to drive across town only to be greeted by a seller who says, “Well, I was just kinda throwing out a feeler, not sure if I really want to sell it at this point.” Of course, if their voice is tinged with the languid drawl or hyper-intensity of a narcotics aficionado, there’s a good chance they’re looking for a quick sale—cash talks—so quit reading and start buying! We kid, of course.

4. The meet-up. As the buyer, it’s up to you to go to the seller. Meeting on common ground is always a good idea, and if the seller agrees, make arrangements to meet at a well-lit, mutually agreeable location, preferably one with lots of credible witnesses foot traffic. A local “cars and coffee” event is a good option, as is the parking lot of the local auto-parts store or speed shop. Of course, if the vehicle in question isn’t in running condition, you’ll have to visit the car where it sits.

5. A word about vans. Nothing is more creepy and suspicious than two or more guys loitering around an unmarked, windowless lockbox on wheels in a parking lot. (Especially if your meeting place is near a school or government facility.) We love vans, too, but discretion is advised.

6. Get an inspection. Be realistic. If the deal in question involves a decade-old pickup priced around $3K, it’s unreasonable to start bitching about surface rust or worn upholstery. Take it for spin, and thoroughly exercise the accelerator, brake, and, if applicable, clutch pedal and shifter. The steering and suspension will inevitably be looser than when new, but overt creaks, clicks, or clunks could indicate a potential safety issue. On the other hand, if you’re looking for a late-model daily driver for the wife to shuttle the kids around in—or you’re purchasing a classic—do yourself a favor and have it inspected by a reputable shop or expert in the make. A seller with nothing to hide will be more than agreeable.

7. Negotiate. Everything on Craigslist is negotiable. Even if a seller states that a price is firm, the very nature of Craigslist and its low, low price of free for the listings encourages ambitious pricing. Haggling as portrayed on television, however, where the seller caves after a tense 15-second negotiation and lets the car go for half of the asking price rarely happens in the real world. It’s OK to start low, but insulting a seller with an absurdly low number can quickly sour a deal. To score a good price while retaining a modicum of dignity, try asking the seller what their bottom dollar is, and then counter with an offer 15 to 20 percent below that figure; chances are you’ll be within 10 percent of the actual number the owner needs to get the deal done. Always negotiate in person; the only thing cheaper than talk is a tactless e-mail. One last thing: Seal the deal with a handshake, as the human element imparts an air of finality to the deal that only a true psychopath could ignore.

8. Make sure there’s a clean title. Talk is cheap, and when it comes to a missing or suspicious title, everyone has a story. Sorting out an unsound title or sourcing a duplicate is possible, but our experience proves it can be time-consuming and soul-crushing work. So unless the car in question is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, walk. You don’t need the hassle. If a bank or financing company still holds the title on a vehicle, ask the seller to make some calls to ensure everything is kosher, and that the title can be obtained and delivered without undue delay.

9. The exchange. When it comes time to trade green for pink, you can’t find a better location than your personal bank. In addition to being the home turf for your money, banks generally have a notary public on staff who can witness signatures and emboss the bill of sale or other paperwork with their all-important official seal. Building a sound paper trail is a great way to protect yourself in any transaction, so don’t be afraid to ask the seller to take a certified check if the selling price is more than a couple of grand.

10. The road home. At this point, the vehicle in question is yours. Unless spelled out in writing beforehand, the seller has every reason to expect you’ll be removing it from his property pronto. Suddenly announcing that you need to, “get my El Camino running first—to make room,” is of little concern to the seller. If your new vehicle needs to be towed, have arrangements in place; if it’s a driver, buy a pal lunch and have him drop you off. Before you leave, double check to make sure you have everything: the manuals, the spares, and the loose interior bits from that box that was in the trunk. Once the previous owner has your cash, they’ll have little incentive to track you down to hand off anything you forgot.


Mercedes-Benz A-class Concept – News – Car and Driver #auto #vans


#mercedes auto
#

It may be a front-wheel-drive compact underneath, but the A-class concept is liquid lust.

With automakers from St. Petersburg to Seoul presenting show cars heralded as the future of wheeled urban logistics, the Mercedes-Benz A-class concept taking the stand at this year s New York auto show is a breath of fresh air. (It also will be simultaneously unveiled at the Shanghai auto show .) There are no electric motors spinning the rubber here a conventional engine and transmission motivate the curvaceous car. It previews Benz s upcoming competitor for the Audi A3, Volkswagen Golf, and BMW 1-series.

Auto-Show Styling Mostly

Benz s first preview of its next-gen small cars came via the F800 Style concept. and this A-class concept moves the design language one step closer to reality. Still, despite this car s connection to an actual future product, don t expect everything from the concept on the stand in New York to be duplicated in production.

Among the A-class s pure auto-show fantasies: the LED-lit turn signals delicately integrated into the sliver of a mount for the side-view mirrors and the star-filled sky pattern on the grill and lower air dam. The same can be said for the wheels very cool, but very much not happening.

Other aspects of the concept s design are no less bold but more realistic. The prominent strake starting behind the front wheel and sweeping up to the top of the rear fender is abrupt; it could be toned down for the real deal, and the same goes for the AMG-esque hood strakes. The elegant side-window profile recalls those on several Mercedes coupes, and the ginormous headlights, which here are illuminated by LEDs and integrate fiber-optic daytime running lights, are straight outta the CLS.


Safe Driving Tips for Teenage Drivers # #teen #drivers, #teen #driver #safety, #car #insurance #


#

Safe Driving Tips For Teenage Drivers

It’s a fact: teenage drivers account for more auto accidents than any other age group.

However, by practicing safe driving techniques―such as driving defensively―you’ll increase the odds you’ll keep yourself (and your passengers) safe on the road and you’ll increase your changes of getting more affordable car insurance as you build a good driving record.

Safety Tips for Teen Drivers

Whether you’re just getting ready to hit the road or have been driving for months―or even years―take some time to review these 8 safe driving tips.

1) Keep Your Cell Phone Off

Multiple studies indicate using a cell phone while driving is the equivalent of driving drunk ―that’s even when using a hands-free phone.

NOTE . Your state may prohibit the use of cell phones while driving. An increasing amount of states are creating laws regarding cell phone use and texting. Often, younger drivers face stricter laws.

2) Don’t Text

Research shows texting―on average―causes a loss of focus on the road for 4.6 seconds. You can drive the length of a full football field in that time. A lot can go wrong while you drive the length of a football field without your eyes on the road.

Don’t try the “texting-while-stopped” approach, either, as many states ban texting while behind the wheel. And, when you have your head down, you won’t notice key developments that may occur. Remember, you still need to pay attention to the road when you’re stopped.

3) Turn on Your Headlights

Using your headlights increases your visibility and help other drivers see you, even when you feel like it’s light out.

In the early morning and early evening (dusk), you need to use your lights or other drivers might not see you, which can be disastrous.

4) Obey the Speed Limit

Speeding is a major contributor to fatal teen accidents. That’s especially true when driving on roads with lots of traffic or with which you’re not familiar.

Don’t feel pressured to keep up with traffic if it seems like everyone else is flying by you. Driving a safe speed helps ensure your well-being, and keeps you away from costly traffic tickets that can cause a sharp hike in your auto insurance premiums.

5) Minimize Distractions

It may be tempting to eat, drink, flip around the radio dial, or play music loudly while you’re cruising around town; however, all can cause your mind or vision to wander, even for a few seconds.

As an inexperienced driver, you are more apt to lose control of your car. Distractions can significantly increase the chances that you 1) not notice impending danger or notice it too late and 2) lose the ability to control the vehicle.

6) Drive Solo

Having a single teen passenger in your car can double the risk of causing a car accident. Adding additional teen passengers causes the risk to escalate.

7) Practice Defensive Driving

Always be aware of the traffic ahead, behind, and next to you, and have possible escape routes in mind. Stay at least one car length behind the car in front of you in slower speeds, and maintain a larger buffer zone with faster speeds.

Some car insurance companies will even give you a discount if you take an approved defensive driving course to improve your driving skills.

8) Choose a Safe Car

If possible, drive a safe car with the latest safety equipment (such as anti-lock brakes, electronic stability control, and air bags), and one with an excellent crash safety record.

Final Word: Teens Becoming Safe Drivers

There’s no substitute for driving experience and the wisdom that age brings, but by applying the above tips you’ll enhance the odds you won’t become a teenage driver accident statistic. Also, when you have a good driving record free of accidents, it’s easier to find cheap car insurance in the future.

DMV.org Insurance Finder

Join 1,972,984 Americans who searched DMV.org for car insurance rates:

THE PLEDGE


DriverIdentifier – The most simple & easy driver updating tool #driveridentifier, #driver #identifier, #driver #updater, #fix #driver


#

Fixing your computer drivers in 3 easy steps:
Install. Scan. Download.

Fix your drivers in 3 steps

1. Download and Install the application.
2. Start scanning.
3. Download your drivers.

Why Use DriverIdentifier?

You have just bought a new computer or someone gives you a laptop as a gift? Or you probably want to re-install your computer? After reinstalling the operating system, you find out that there are some devices not working such as no sound, no Wifi. It’s because these devices do not have the right driver. You probably go to the Internet and search one by one. This is not an easy work; it might takes hours or even impossible. We see your issues, that is the reason why we create DriverIdentifier. DriverIdentifier will help you find all your needed drivers in just a few minutes.

Key Features

  • An incredible database. DriverIdentifier commits to provide the most updated drivers. It’s simply because we have advanced techniques to find and update drivers continiuosly.
  • No internet connetion Don’t worry if you have no internet connection. Just download our application to your USB, open it in your offline computer.
  • Any drivers for any computers. Simplifies downloading new drivers from the Internet.
  • Drivers update capability Updates previously installed drivers to their latest versions. Windows XP / Vista / 7 /8 / 10 (x86-x64) Supports all modern operating systems! Both 64-bit and 32-bit versions!
  • Easy to use Simple and foolproof interface.

JOIN US – GET LATEST UPDATE

WHAT PEOPLE SAY:

Thank you so much i downloaded a driver so i can use my VGA Lead from my computer to my television. I searched the net endlessly and came across your site.I’m book marking your site you are a god send.
Thanks so much.
— John McKenzie, Computer Network Technician, Lompoc Unified School District

LATEST SCAN REPORT


Selling Yourself: How to Sell Your Car Online, the Right Way – Feature – Car and Driver #best #auto #insurance #companies


#how to sell your car
#

Selling Yourself: How to Offload Your Car Online, The Right Way

July 29, 2015 at 9:20 am by Aaron Robinson | Illustration by Chris Philpot

We are programmed by nature to acquire, which is one reason selling is so much less fun than buying. But almost all automotive love affairs end, and selling a car online painlessly and for the highest price takes some planning and effort. Look at it this way: The extra hour you spend taking good pictures and writing a thorough description for a sales site may net you another $1000 or more. Not bad for an hour’s labor.

Step 1: Pick the right sales venue.

You’d no more list a ’96 Mustang on Hemmings than you would a Bugatti Veyron on Craigslist—unless you wanted to be called by 15,000 bored teenagers. All online classified sites have their weaknesses: eBay’s relentless countdown clock seems to make idiots out of some bidders, who ultimately back out; Cars.com and AutoTrader.com charge and mix you in with a lot of dealer ads; and Craigslist’s free ads mean you’re lost in a tsunami of daily listings. In general, if you are a gambler who abhors personal contact, eBay is for you. If you don’t live in paranoid fear of the public, then Craigslist is a perfect, no-cost outlet. The other sites lie somewhere in between.

Step 2: Take at least 30 pictures.

Good pictures sell cars. Make sure you get all four sides and the roof, and don’t forget the engine, the interior, the odometer, and even the undercarriage. Nobody wants to buy a car covered in cat prints and gardening crap from a dark garage. Drag it out, clean it, and shoot it. Even better, shoot it in the “sweet light” of a nice evening.

Step 3: Write a description.

“Runs xlnt” won’t cut it. Say how long you’ve had it, what work you’ve done, what’s good about it, and also what’s bad. Be honest; the more flaws you include, the more the buyer will trust that you’re not completely clueless or hiding a disaster.

Step 4: Set a price.

eBay’s own research shows that low reserves produce higher sale prices, because once the reserve is met, the bidding takes off. So be brave and don’t use a reserve, or set the reserve at the lowest rock-bottom sum you’ll accept. On a fixed-price site like Craigslist, research what other people are asking for similar cars.

Step 5: Sell!

Put your phone number in the ad. The NSA already has it and nobody else cares. If you are fearful of spam bots, spell it out this way: 55five1two1two. If you’re selling on Craigslist, post the ad on Thursday so it’s not lost in a billion other ads when the weekend arrives. If you’re selling through eBay, end the auction on Sunday evening, when people are sitting around with nothing better to do than look at cars online. Be available to answer your phone, and when the sale is done, be kind to your fellow man and pull down the ad immediately. Then start looking for a new car.


David E #experience #dui #defense #attorney, #utah #dui #law #penalties, #best #utah #dui #defense #lawyer, #utah #dui #defense #attorney, #dui #utah #lawyer, #charged #with #dui, #utah #dui #lawyer, #utah #dui #driver #license #penalties,first #offense #dui #in #utah,dui #felony #utah, #impaired #driving #vs #dui #utah, #dui #utah #license #suspension, #utah #dui #sentencing #matrix, #utah #dui #statute, #utah #dui #records, #what #is #the #legal #bac #in #most #states, #dui #arrests #in #utah


#

Utah DUI Defense Attorney

Why Choose David Rosenbloom?

  • I exclusively defend DUI cases throughout Utah.
  • A member of the National College For DUI Defense Attorneys. Experienced, Dedicated and Successful Lawyer.
  • We thoroughly and aggressively investigate cases, from the moment we are hired, to build the best possible defense.
  • NEVER Plead Guilty Without A Competent DUI Attorney Evaluating Your Case First.

A DUI Defense How A Utah DUI Works: Arrested for DUI? Do you feel that your life is over? Learn the Three Part Defense: Know The Three (3) Parts To Any DUI FIRST: Was There A Legal Reason To Stop You? If NO then the case can be won using the 4th

The “Hidden” DUI Law in Utah You Do Not Understand The Law Regarding Driving Under the Influence in Utah THE RULE: Actual Physical Control (APC) Of A “Vehicle” + “Impairment” = DUI VEHICLE: Means any device upon which a person may be drawn or transported

The Fourth Amendment And Suppression The Number One Way To Win Your DUI Case. If you feel you were stopped for a bogus reason, especially late at night, you may have been stopped illegally and, as a result, ALL the evidence collected by the officer – no


Car insurance for young drivers #young #driver #car #insurance, #teen #drivers, #teen #car #insurance, #teenager #car #insurance #rates, #car #insurance #discounts #for #teenagers, #car #insurance #for #young #drivers


#

Car insurance for young drivers

Starting to drive is an exciting moment for teens, but for their parents, it can be stressful and it will certainly be expensive. The good news is that you can check quotes from different insurance companies and minimize the damage to your wallet. Let us guide you through buying car insurance for young drivers to help you save money.

Policies

Before your teen starts driving, you should know:

  • All drivers in a household need to be added to a car insurance policy. There is no easy or cheap way to get around car insurance for a new driver. Either you need to add your teen to your policy, or the teen needs his own policy.
  • Sharing a joint policy with a teen is cheaper than paying for separate policies. Additionally, there is no benefit to a teen getting his own policy. This doesn’t mean, however, that you should simply add your teen to your current policy and be done with it. Adding a new driver means your company generates your rates all over again, and a different company may give you a better deal. Shop around by getting quotes from several companies.

Do I have to add my teen once he has a learner s permit?

The process of insuring a new driver typically starts when the teen gets a learner’s permit. Once teens get a learner’s permit (aka provisional license or instruction permit in some states), some companies allow you to add them to your policy at no additional charge until they get their licenses or turn 18. They allow this because state permit-holder laws require a licensed driver age 21 or older in the passenger seat, making the young driver less of a risk. Other auto insurance providers require that teens be added when they are in the permit stage, so check with your provider.

Start now by finding car insurance companies in your area

Do I have to add my teen to my policy if he doesn t own a car?

Yes. It doesn t matter that he doesn t have his own car; he has access to yours. If you don t add him to your policy and he is in an accident, your policy may not cover him. Some car insurance companies explicitly note in their policies that unless you notify them of additional drivers or risks, those individuals will not be covered. If they do cover the accident, the insurer may require you to pay back premiums from the time the teen was licensed.

If your teen is getting a license but isn t going to drive your cars — ever — then in some states, some insurers will let you exclude the teen from your policy. If you do exclude a teen, or anyone, from your policy, there will be no car insurance coverage extended if they are in an accident. Many insurance companies want you to tell them about household residents who are over a certain age (usually 15) whether that person is licensed or not.

Do I have to tell my insurance company about my teen if he isn t licensed?

Yes, you usually do. When you renew your policy, you are usually asked for information on everyone in your household. If your child hasn t received a permit or license yet, the teen usually can be listed as unlicensed on your policy. When a young driver is noted as unlicensed, he also should be unrated by the car insurance company, meaning the teen wouldn’t affect your rates.

Who should insure a teen if the parents are divorced?

In general, the custodial parent s policy is primary for the newly licensed driver. However, if the child will drive when staying at the second home, both parents typically need to list the teen as a driver. Car insurance companies deal with this situation differently, so check with your company and ask what your new rates will be. This way you ll know what to shoot for if you decide to shop around for a better deal.

How can a teen get his own policy?

A teen driver can get a car insurance policy of his own, but if he s under 18, a parent or guardian signature is required on the policy since insurance is a legal contract. Even if you are willing to sign on the policy with a young driver, keep in mind that it s cheaper if the teen is added to your policy instead. Read our age-specific guides for teen drivers to see how rates differ depending on whether the teen is on his own policy or the parent;s:

Rates

How much does car insurance for new drivers cost?

Our analysis of the cost of adding a teen driver showed an average increase of 160% when a married couple added a teenage boy to their car insurance policy. This number can only be used to give you a very general sense of how much your rates will increase. Every situation is different, and rates depend on your insurance provider, coverage options, ZIP code, vehicles, driving records, how much you drive and many more factors.

Why is car insurance for young drivers so expensive?

Teens are inexperienced behind the wheel and immature by nature. That’s a bad combination. A brand-new driver is 12 times more likely to have an accident than someone with a year of experience, says the National Institutes of Health. A 16-year-old who s had one accident is 50 percent more likely to have another, says the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration. In addition, maturity levels change quickly. Teens who get their licenses at age 18 have fewer fatal accidents than those who are licensed at age 16. Many insurers no longer lump all young drivers together but instead rate age groups separately.

At what age do young drivers’ rates go down?

The age of 25 is typically when insurance companies begin to offer the same rates they do to all other adults. Some carriers will lower rates for women when they turn 21 and men when they turn 24. Once you re no longer priced as a young driver, your insurance provider will rate you based on your driving record rather than those for young drivers in general. In addition to rating drivers based on age, insurers can also levy a surcharge for inexperience, usually for those who have been licensed less than a year. To get a better sense of how insurance rates change by age, see average insurance rates by age .

Discounts

Good student discount

Encourage your kid to do well in school because student car insurance discounts can help bring down your rates. Each insurer has its own guidelines, but typically the discount can be 10 percent to 15 percent. Each insurer always has its own rule for what constitutes a good student either a 3.0 grade point average or above, placement on dean s list or honor roll, or ranking in the top 20 percent of the class.

Safe driver discount

Look into discounts for new drivers who take a safe-driver course, sometimes sponsored by the insurance company. This may mean attending an actual classroom driver s education class, watching a driving video, or passing a written driving safety test. Your company may also offer discounts if the teen drives with devices that monitor driver behavior.

Cars for Teen Drivers

Given the cost of car insurance for your teen, you may want him driving a car this is cheap to buy and cheap to insure. Check out our list of the 20 best used cars for teens .

The least expensive cars to buy aren t always the least expensive to insure. Some cars cost more to repair after an accident, and some have a record of more injury claims than others do. And the least expensive car to insure may not be the safest. Electronic equipment such as stability control and antilock brakes can help novice drivers avoid accidents, and there can be a discount for having them. The lowest car insurance rates are often given to drivers with minivans and small SUVs.

Insurance for College Students

When a teen moves out to go to college, you ve got another car insurance decision to make, based on whether the teen owns a car, how far he moves, if he s going to drive a family car while in town, etc. Read our guide to car insurance for college students to get guidance for your unique case.


Teen Car Accidents #teen #car #accidents, #crash, #teenager, #auto #accident, #articles, #photo, #teenage, #male #driver, #driving #picture, #teen #car #accidents #statistics, #statistics #on #teen #car #accidents, #pictures, #junior #operator #license, #restrictions, #youth, #teenage #car #accidents, #of #teenage #car, #accidents #teenagers, #to #accidents #most, #cause #most #teenage, #teenage, #drivers #who, #cause #of #car, #in #the #car, #driving #techniques #that, #techniques #and #driving, #photos, #story, #young, #inexperience, #speed, #wrecks, #crash, #accidents, #crashed #cars, #crashed, #auto #accident #picture, #teens, #car #wreck, #motor, #road, #part, #video, #vehicle, #accidents, #teenagers, #wrecked, #car #accident #crashed.


#

Teen Car Accidents. Teenage Car Crashes.
Car Crashes are the leading cause of death for teens in the United States and accidents while driving cause 36% of all deaths in this age group according to the Centers for Disease Control. Drive Safer!

Teenage Driver Facts:
Deaths. Each Year over 5,000 teens ages 16 to 20 Die due to Fatal injuries caused Car accidents. About 400,000 drivers age 16 to 20 will be seriously injured.

Risks. The risk of being involved in a car accident the highest for drivers aged 16- to 19-year-olds than it is for any other age group. For each mile driven, teen drivers ages 16 to 19 are about four times more likely than other drivers to crash.

Stats. Teenagers are about 10 percent of the US Population but account for 12 percent all Fatal Car Crashes.

Costs. Drivers (both male and female) under age 24 account for 30% – $26 billion Dollars of the total costs of Car accidents in the US.

Male Versus Female. The car accident death rate for teen male drivers and passengers is more than one and a half times female teen driver (19.4 killed per 100,000 male drivers compared with 11.1 killed per 100,000 female drivers.

New Drivers. The risk of a Crash risk is much higher during the first year teenagers are able to drive.

Two Teenagers Killed

Warrensburg, Illinois

Teen Speeding Road Rage Crash

Atlanta, Georgia

Teen Drinking Crash

Minneapolis, MN

Why are Teenager Drivers at More Risk? According to Studies: Teenager drivers tend to underestimate hazardous driving situations and are less able than older drivers to recognize dangerous situations.

Teenager Drivers are more to speed and tailgate.

Having Male teen passengers in the car has been shown to increase the likelihood of high risk driving behaviors among teenage male drivers.

Of Male drivers killed between 15 and 20 years of age 38% were speeding and 24% had been drinking and driving .

Teens have the lowest rate of seat belt use. According to surveys about 10% of high school students report they do not wear seat belts.

Trailers Suck

Teen Encounters one

More Teen Accident Facts: About 23% of drivers ages 15 to 20 who died in car crashes had a Blood Alcohol Counts of 0.08 or higher.

About 30% of teens reported that within the previous 30 days, they had been a passenger in a car with a driver who had been drinking alcohol. One in 10 teens said that they personally had driven after drinking alcohol.

Teen drivers killed in auto crashes after drinking and driving. 74% did not wear a seat belt.

More than half of teen deaths from car crashes occurred between 3 p.m. and midnight and 54% occurred on weekends: Friday, Saturday, or Sunday.

16 Year Old Shattered Knee Cap

Florida

Junior Operator License

Utica, NY

Jaws of Life Save Teen

Pacific Heights, California

World Wide Crash Guide

Thousands of Crashes from 64 + Countries

Car Crash Videos? Send them to us.

Car-Accidents.com is being built by our millions of viewers who have sent in their experiences and shared their pictures and stories. The stories told on Car-Accidents.com range from those of tragic loss, narrow escapes, cautionary tales and routine rear enders. You are invited to share your story with the millions of visitors we receive from around the the world.

General Guidelines for Sending Your Pictures, Video and Story:

1. Please use either a jpg, bmp or gif format.

2. Tell us your story, there is no limit to what you can send us but please try include a description, date of the accident, (make model of the vehicle if known) and the accident location ( City, State, or the Country if outside US ). This makes for a more interesting page! You agree to our terms and conditions .
3. Send your photo and story to Thank you!

4. If your video is very large, please send us a link.

Car Crash Photo Gallery: Hundreds of Car Accident Photos

See Car Crashes Organized By US states Here

View Car Accident Organized by Country


Online Car Sales Pit Carmaker and Dealer Against the Middleman – Feature – Car and Driver #summit #auto #parts


#online car sales
#

Online Car Sales Are Pitting Carmaker and Dealer Against the Middleman

November 26, 2015 at 11:02 am by James Cobb and Norman Mayersohn | Illustration by Andy Potts

From the December 2015 issue

It was just a crumb of news on the floor of the vast American car market: In July, AutoNation, the publicly traded megadealer that is the country’s largest new-car retailer, severed its ties to TrueCar, the third-party shopping service that referred prospective customers to its stores. But the split may have consequences beyond the spat over business practices and data ownership that caused the separation. After years in which dealers willingly ceded the online sales turf to intermediaries, car sellers are now fighting back. Just as hotel chains have been building their own apps to reclaim travelers from aggregators such as Priceline and Expedia, automakers and dealers are creating digital storefronts to wrest online shoppers from the middlemen.

Late last year, AutoNation rolled out AutoNation Express, spending $300 mil­lion on data systems to track the 70,000 vehicles in its national inventory. Carmakers are stepping up, too: In May, Toyota started a pilot program for its Scion brand called Pure Process Plus, aimed at young, tech-savvy consumers. The results have been encouraging enough that the com­pany is launching a similar online shop­ping tool for the Toyota brand next year.

It will join Ford Direct, the granddaddy of automaker sites that was launched in 2000, and General Motors’ two-year-old Shop-Click-Drive, for which GM hired 8000 programmers, according to the Wall Street Journal. What these carmaker shopping sites have in common is speeding ­customers far enough through the sales process so that a local dealership merely has to dot the i’s and cross the t’s. Scion Pure Process Plus handles every stage of a new-car transaction, including credit approval. Once buyers finish, they print a certificate to take to the dealer in exchange for the keys. The goal is to have the customer driving away in an hour.

What these carmaker shopping sites have in common is speeding ­customers far enough through the sales process so that a local dealership merely has to dot the i’s and cross the t’s.

Among the established third-party shopping services, TrueCar is the one that has shaken up automotive retail the most. What sprang up in an era of research sites that served up the holy grail of dealer invoice pricing is today a sophisticated network. Dealers subscribing to TrueCar can deliver no-haggle quotes to shoppers based on typical local transaction prices, information that is provided by these same retailers. Dealers pay a monthly fee to participate and also pay around $300 each for referrals that lead to a new-car sale. TrueCar itself is something of an iceberg with only its tip showing; most of its business is cloaked by partnerships with huge affinity groups such as AARP, American Express, Consumer Reports, and Costco.

There are strong incentives for automakers and dealer chains to bring the online shopping process in-house. Dealers are eyeing the spiffs they pay for the leads, but there is also the issue of transaction data, which TrueCar collects from its subscribing dealers. AutoNation walked away because of TrueCar’s demand for information from all its sales, not just the ones that resulted from a TrueCar lead. This practice makes TrueCar stand out among third-party lead providers, and it’s how the company provides deal context to car buyers, assuring that they’ll “never overpay,” as promised in the company’s tagline. Implicit in AutoNation’s decision is the understanding that there is big value in this data, and not just to TrueCar.

For car manufacturers, there are other concerns, such as the customer experience and the brand positioning their marketing budgets seek to reinforce. Automakers have been less than thrilled with race-to-the-bottom competition among dealers. Honda and Toyota have threatened action against those stores that advertised below-invoice prices, a practice that has been widespread on third-party sites.

Nearly everyone in the business recognizes that the old model is on borrowed time, and that inevitably larger percentages of new cars will be bought over the internet. In the coming showdown for ­digi­tal turf, the automakers have the name recognition and financial resources, the dealers have the protection of state franchise laws. But the independents have vast member networks, an established track record, online expertise, user trust, and a reach that encompasses all brands and models. The winner? It may be the customer, who stands to spend less time kicking tires and jousting with the finance office.