Auto and Homeowners Insurance: Is AARP Looking Out for You? CBS News #auto #invoice #prices


#auto and home insurance
#

Auto and Homeowners Insurance: Is AARP Looking Out for You?

Last Updated Oct 9, 2009 1:34 PM EDT

The way insurance companies barrage you with television ads promising to save you money, you might think they were paying you instead of the other way around. In the case of the GEICO googly eyes or actor Dennis Haysbert hawking Allstate policies, at least it’s private companies pitching their wares. But then there are the auto insurance ads touting the $388 saved, on average, by people who switched to plans offered through AARP by The Hartford Financial Services Group. The ads also say that AARP members who own homes might save an additional $148 by switching their homeowners coverage. In this case, the trusted nonprofit is lending its name to a commercial venture. Pay less, get the AARP imprimatur. What’s not to like? Read on to find out.

As part of our continuing analysis of AARP s financial services products (earlier stories covered AARP mutual funds and AARP life insurance and annuities ), we wondered how well the huge organization was treating its 40 million members with the homeowners and auto policies it sells. So we examined the coverage and compared AARP/The Hartford prices with those of Allstate, State Farm, GEICO, and Progressive in three zip codes to answer the question, Should you put AARP on your policy shopping list?

Our answer: If you are shopping on price alone, no. You can save money in some cases a lot of money by taking your business elsewhere. But the policies do offer a few appealing features that you might find are more than worth the extra cost. And The Hartford has an impressive customer service record.

AARP has marketed The Hartford s homeowners and auto policies for 25 years and deserves credit for choosing a quality partner. The Hartford was among the top five insurers in J.D. Power and Associates 2008 homeowners and auto insurance customer service surveys. They have a reputation for working with their customers and trying to solve problems without litigating claims, compared to some of their competitors, says Amy Bach, executive director of United Policyholders. a San Francisco-based organization that advocates for consumers on home and auto insurance. The number of complaints filed against The Hartford, as tracked by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, is below the industry average and has been declining for the past several years.

Middling Marks for Prices

AARP s homeowners and auto policies are often not the least expensive, however, which echoes what we found with its life insurance offerings. There is a cost to having some of the features in the program, acknowledges Richard Hisey, president of AARP Financial, the for-profit arm of AARP. We believe that if you re comparing apples-to-apples features, we will be cost-competitive.

For our price-shopping survey, we asked AARP/The Hartford, Allstate, State Farm, GEICO, and Progressive for quotes for a 53-year-old AARP member driving a 2008 Nissan Rogue and living in a $250,000 wood-frame house. And since the cost of the same insurance can vary by zip code, we requested quotes in Charlotte, N.C.; Scottsdale, Ariz.; and Schaumburg, Ill. We told the insurers to apply any standard auto discounts available based on his driving record and profile. Since AARP s auto rates were for 12 months and the others were for six months, we divided AARP s figures in half.

For auto insurance, AARP/The Hartford was the priciest insurer in Scottsdale and Schaumburg and in the middle of the pack in Charlotte. Progressive was the least expensive in Scottsdale, costing a whopping 42 percent less than AARP/The Hartford. GEICO was the cheapest in both Charlotte and Schaumburg, charging 28 percent less and 15 percent less, respectively, than AARP/The Hartford.

Auto Insurance Six-Month Premium


Volo Auto Museum Gets Elvis – Custom Cadillac – CBS Chicago #auto #refinance


#volo auto museum
#

Volo Auto Museum Gets Elvis Custom Cadillac

Elvis Presley had a Cadillac sedan custom-made into a station wagon to haul his musical equipment between Graceland and the airport. (Credit: Volo Auto Museum)

CHICAGO (CBS) Illinois Volo Auto Museum has a new addition for its Cars of the Rich and Famous, collection.

We ve been looking for the right Elvis car to add to our collection, Volo director Brian Grams said.

He stumbled across Elvis Presley s custom-made pink and white Cadillac station wagon while doing a Google search that led him to a classified ad.

I clicked on it and as I m reading the description, it was Elvis car, he said. Cadillac never made a station wagon. He bought a four-door sedan and had it customized into a station wagon.

The King of Rock n Roll used it to haul musical equipment between Graceland and the airport. Grams said this was the forgotten Elvis Caddy.

It was sold back in 1977, three months after he passed away, for $50,000 which was about a quarter of a million dollars in today s money. It pretty much disappeared after that, went into a private collection, he said.

One week from today, it will go on public display, part of the Volo Museum s collection of cars owned by the rich and famous.

WBBM 780’s Regine Schlesinger


New York Auto Show 2015: Cadillac, Lincoln luxury cars unveiled – CBS News #auto #for #sale #by #owner


#ny auto show
#

Cutting-edge luxury cars unveiled at the 2015 New York Auto Show

NEW YORK — When the doors opened at this year’s New York International Auto Show, CBS News got a sneak peek at the latest state-of-the-art automotive technology and design. CNET Editor-at-Large Tim Stevens took a tour the insides of two of Detroit’s top sedans — Cadillac and Lincoln.

One of Cadillac’s luxury cars that debuted was its latest flagship model, the 2016 Cadillac CT6. With 400 horsepower under the hood, there’s more to the car than its modern, breathtaking exterior.

“On the inside of course there is leather everywhere, but there are also some racier touches,” Stevens said, pointing to the brushed aluminum trim and carbon fiber on the dashboard.

But the more interesting thing is its latest in-vehicle Cadillac User Experience (CUE) infotainment system, Stevens said. CUE pairs data from Bluetooth-enabled mobile devices, USBs, SD cards and MP3 players with the system. Through the 8-inch touchscreen in the car, the users can navigate through the functions, which include receiving and sending text messages, or even streaming audio.

Another American luxury car that had crowds of people hovering towards it was the Lincoln Continental.

“It shows us a new direction of design for Lincoln,” Stevens said. “It’s long and low, and it’s beautiful. It’s kind of radical looking compared to current Lincolns.”

Even more radical is the interior design. Inside the Continental, the rear seats are inspired by luxury air travel. The seats can recline, while simultaneously the front seat moves out of the way to make room. On the center console, a work table pops up. As icing on the cake, the car comes with leather loafers that are tucked away in the back pockets.

While this is just a concept, Lincoln is promising a new full-size leather some time next year.

2015 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.


Volo Auto Museum Gets Elvis – Custom Cadillac – CBS Chicago #nappa #auto #parts


#volo auto museum
#

Volo Auto Museum Gets Elvis Custom Cadillac

Elvis Presley had a Cadillac sedan custom-made into a station wagon to haul his musical equipment between Graceland and the airport. (Credit: Volo Auto Museum)

CHICAGO (CBS) Illinois Volo Auto Museum has a new addition for its Cars of the Rich and Famous, collection.

We ve been looking for the right Elvis car to add to our collection, Volo director Brian Grams said.

He stumbled across Elvis Presley s custom-made pink and white Cadillac station wagon while doing a Google search that led him to a classified ad.

I clicked on it and as I m reading the description, it was Elvis car, he said. Cadillac never made a station wagon. He bought a four-door sedan and had it customized into a station wagon.

The King of Rock n Roll used it to haul musical equipment between Graceland and the airport. Grams said this was the forgotten Elvis Caddy.

It was sold back in 1977, three months after he passed away, for $50,000 which was about a quarter of a million dollars in today s money. It pretty much disappeared after that, went into a private collection, he said.

One week from today, it will go on public display, part of the Volo Museum s collection of cars owned by the rich and famous.

WBBM 780’s Regine Schlesinger


Auto and Homeowners Insurance: Is AARP Looking Out for You? CBS News #auto #dealer #supplies


#auto and home insurance
#

Auto and Homeowners Insurance: Is AARP Looking Out for You?

Last Updated Oct 9, 2009 1:34 PM EDT

The way insurance companies barrage you with television ads promising to save you money, you might think they were paying you instead of the other way around. In the case of the GEICO googly eyes or actor Dennis Haysbert hawking Allstate policies, at least it’s private companies pitching their wares. But then there are the auto insurance ads touting the $388 saved, on average, by people who switched to plans offered through AARP by The Hartford Financial Services Group. The ads also say that AARP members who own homes might save an additional $148 by switching their homeowners coverage. In this case, the trusted nonprofit is lending its name to a commercial venture. Pay less, get the AARP imprimatur. What’s not to like? Read on to find out.

As part of our continuing analysis of AARP s financial services products (earlier stories covered AARP mutual funds and AARP life insurance and annuities ), we wondered how well the huge organization was treating its 40 million members with the homeowners and auto policies it sells. So we examined the coverage and compared AARP/The Hartford prices with those of Allstate, State Farm, GEICO, and Progressive in three zip codes to answer the question, Should you put AARP on your policy shopping list?

Our answer: If you are shopping on price alone, no. You can save money in some cases a lot of money by taking your business elsewhere. But the policies do offer a few appealing features that you might find are more than worth the extra cost. And The Hartford has an impressive customer service record.

AARP has marketed The Hartford s homeowners and auto policies for 25 years and deserves credit for choosing a quality partner. The Hartford was among the top five insurers in J.D. Power and Associates 2008 homeowners and auto insurance customer service surveys. They have a reputation for working with their customers and trying to solve problems without litigating claims, compared to some of their competitors, says Amy Bach, executive director of United Policyholders. a San Francisco-based organization that advocates for consumers on home and auto insurance. The number of complaints filed against The Hartford, as tracked by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, is below the industry average and has been declining for the past several years.

Middling Marks for Prices

AARP s homeowners and auto policies are often not the least expensive, however, which echoes what we found with its life insurance offerings. There is a cost to having some of the features in the program, acknowledges Richard Hisey, president of AARP Financial, the for-profit arm of AARP. We believe that if you re comparing apples-to-apples features, we will be cost-competitive.

For our price-shopping survey, we asked AARP/The Hartford, Allstate, State Farm, GEICO, and Progressive for quotes for a 53-year-old AARP member driving a 2008 Nissan Rogue and living in a $250,000 wood-frame house. And since the cost of the same insurance can vary by zip code, we requested quotes in Charlotte, N.C.; Scottsdale, Ariz.; and Schaumburg, Ill. We told the insurers to apply any standard auto discounts available based on his driving record and profile. Since AARP s auto rates were for 12 months and the others were for six months, we divided AARP s figures in half.

For auto insurance, AARP/The Hartford was the priciest insurer in Scottsdale and Schaumburg and in the middle of the pack in Charlotte. Progressive was the least expensive in Scottsdale, costing a whopping 42 percent less than AARP/The Hartford. GEICO was the cheapest in both Charlotte and Schaumburg, charging 28 percent less and 15 percent less, respectively, than AARP/The Hartford.

Auto Insurance Six-Month Premium


Should you buy a certified used car? CBS News #cheap #auto #parts


#where to buy used cars
#

Should you buy a certified used car?

As gas prices have fallen, U.S. new car sales have surged. But buyers are snapping up certified used cars as well, with certified sales in November up 21 percent over a year earlier, according to CNW research.

Thrifty habits developed during the recession are leading buyers to what the industry calls certified pre-owned vehicles, says senior analyst Karl Brauer of Kelley Blue Book and kbb.com. “The last recession increased the price sensitivity of car buyers, driving many to consider certified pre-owned for the first time,” says Brauer. Certified cars typically get a thorough inspection and repair of defects at a dealership, along with an additional warranty.

If you share that price sensitivity, consider a certified used car rather than a new car. You should look to save at least $2,000 to $3,000 with a good deal on a certified used car of the previous model year vs. a new car, says Alec Gutierrez, another Kelley senior analyst.

Gutierrez points out, however, that certified deals vary widely depending on how fast a given model depreciates. He cites the following examples:

  • A Honda Accord is known for holding its value. A 2015 Accord EX-L lists for $27,406 and a 2014 certified used one for $26,129 — a savings of just $1,277.
  • A Ford Escape SE, with about average depreciation, sells as a 2015 for $25,421 but as a 2014 certified car for $21,624. That is a savings of $3,797.
  • As an example of big savings, Gutierrez cited the Kia Cadenza large sedan selling as a 2015 for $33,447. A certified used 2014 model could be bought for $25,622 — a savings of $7,825. Among luxury brands, he suggests likely good certified deals for the Cadillac XTS sedan and the Infiniti Q60 coupe or convertible.

If you are considering a certified used car, take these additional factors into account:

Avoid independent used car lots. Independents may advertise certified deals, but you can not be sure the standards are as high as in manufacturer-backed programs.

Make sure the auto maker backs the warranty. Even at a franchised dealer, double check that the warranty on the certified car is, for example, from Ford or General Motors — not an independent warranty company.

Consider certified with older cars. Many cars returning after being leased are three years old. People who lease cars have incentives to keep the car in good shape in order to avoid penalties at lease end. “If the vehicle is passing the manufacturer’s process to get certified, a buyer can be confident it is a solid vehicle — and has coverage if a problem does develop,” says Gutierrez.

Even as the economy recovers, buyers’ appetite for certified used cars is likely to continue. “The awareness and advantages of certified pre-owned have extended to a larger percentage of car buyers in recent years, reaching sufficient critical mass to keep growing steadily going forward,” says analyst Karl Brauer.

2014 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.


How to get the best deal on a used car – CBS News #auto #service #manuals


#best used cars
#

How to get the best deal on a used car

(MoneyWatch) Used car prices will decline in coming months, forecasters say. And new technology can help bargain-hunters know how much they should pay for a vehicle.

A service with the whimsical name of MyVinny.com lets you download an application and scan the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) of any car you are considering. MyVinny will tell you the average wholesale price for that model and thus how to shoot for a good deal.

During the recession that followed the housing crash, used car prices rose because of shrinking supply, as fewer people bought new cars and traded in used ones. But now, because of a combination of more used car trade-ins and lease returns plus rebates and discounting from competing new cars, used prices are likely to decline. “Wholesale values are likely to moderate in coming months due to increased supply,” said Tom Webb, chief economist for used car auction business Manheim.

Buying a used car saves money by avoiding the depreciation inevitable with a new car. But, as a shopper, you have a tougher time finding out an appropriate target price. With a new car you can find out what the dealer paid by looking up the invoice price for that model on websites such as Kelley Blue Book and Edmunds.com. But with a used car, you typically have little idea of the wholesale price of that model as it changed hands at auctions. By collecting auction data, MyVinny.com gives you that price.

The wholesale price data is valuable especially if you are buying from a new or used car dealer. You can get a cheaper price on a similar car from a private seller. But you will get no warranty in the deal and probably have no recourse if something goes wrong with the car.

So if you are heading out to shop for a used car, take these steps:

  • Find out the average retail price for sale by dealers by checking Kelley Blue Book and Edmunds.com. Then look up ads by dealers in your area on a site such as AutoTrader.com.
  • Get the average trade-in value on the pricing sites. If you are shopping at a new car dealership, the car may have been taken in trade on a new model. In that case, the acquisition price usually is even lower than the wholesale auction price.
  • Get the wholesale price. Having downloaded the free Vinny app from the Apple Store or Google Play, scan the VIN number on a car you are considering (usually on a plaque either on the dashboard on the driver’s side or on the door post visible when the door is open.) Within a few seconds, you will get back the wholesale price.
  • In talking to the dealer salesperson, try to find out if the car is a trade-in. He or she might tell you it was traded in while trying to convince you the car is in good condition. If it was traded in, the dealership’s cost basis was likely lower than the wholesale price.

    Take the case of a top-selling midsize sedan, a 2011 Toyota Camry SE. Assuming it has 30,000 miles and typical options, Edmunds lists the dealer retail price at $17,038. The MyVinny average wholesale price for 2011 Camrys is $14,765. And the trade-in value is $14,258. So the dealer stands to make around $2,780 if the car is a trade-in and $2,273 on an auction car.

    Alternatively, let’s say you are looking at an auction car. Set your aim at getting the Camry for $1,000 over the wholesale price while letting the salesperson know you are aware of that wholesale number. But start out bidding $500 over the wholesale price, with a goal of ending up at $1,000 over, or $15,765. That is still 8 percent profit for the dealer.

    If the dealership won’t meet your target, you have to decide how badly you want the car. But don’t go much above $16,000 — or about $1,000 off the original asking price. Especially with a popular car like the Camry, there is always another dealer to offer a competing price.

    As with buying new cars, doing your research means saving money while still getting a used car you want.

    2013 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.


    Should you buy a certified used car? CBS News #auto #wrecking #yards


    #where to buy used cars
    #

    Should you buy a certified used car?

    As gas prices have fallen, U.S. new car sales have surged. But buyers are snapping up certified used cars as well, with certified sales in November up 21 percent over a year earlier, according to CNW research.

    Thrifty habits developed during the recession are leading buyers to what the industry calls certified pre-owned vehicles, says senior analyst Karl Brauer of Kelley Blue Book and kbb.com. “The last recession increased the price sensitivity of car buyers, driving many to consider certified pre-owned for the first time,” says Brauer. Certified cars typically get a thorough inspection and repair of defects at a dealership, along with an additional warranty.

    If you share that price sensitivity, consider a certified used car rather than a new car. You should look to save at least $2,000 to $3,000 with a good deal on a certified used car of the previous model year vs. a new car, says Alec Gutierrez, another Kelley senior analyst.

    Gutierrez points out, however, that certified deals vary widely depending on how fast a given model depreciates. He cites the following examples:

    • A Honda Accord is known for holding its value. A 2015 Accord EX-L lists for $27,406 and a 2014 certified used one for $26,129 — a savings of just $1,277.
    • A Ford Escape SE, with about average depreciation, sells as a 2015 for $25,421 but as a 2014 certified car for $21,624. That is a savings of $3,797.
    • As an example of big savings, Gutierrez cited the Kia Cadenza large sedan selling as a 2015 for $33,447. A certified used 2014 model could be bought for $25,622 — a savings of $7,825. Among luxury brands, he suggests likely good certified deals for the Cadillac XTS sedan and the Infiniti Q60 coupe or convertible.

    If you are considering a certified used car, take these additional factors into account:

    Avoid independent used car lots. Independents may advertise certified deals, but you can not be sure the standards are as high as in manufacturer-backed programs.

    Make sure the auto maker backs the warranty. Even at a franchised dealer, double check that the warranty on the certified car is, for example, from Ford or General Motors — not an independent warranty company.

    Consider certified with older cars. Many cars returning after being leased are three years old. People who lease cars have incentives to keep the car in good shape in order to avoid penalties at lease end. “If the vehicle is passing the manufacturer’s process to get certified, a buyer can be confident it is a solid vehicle — and has coverage if a problem does develop,” says Gutierrez.

    Even as the economy recovers, buyers’ appetite for certified used cars is likely to continue. “The awareness and advantages of certified pre-owned have extended to a larger percentage of car buyers in recent years, reaching sufficient critical mass to keep growing steadily going forward,” says analyst Karl Brauer.

    2014 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.


    Auto and Homeowners Insurance: Is AARP Looking Out for You? CBS News #refinance #auto #loan #with #bad #credit


    #auto and home insurance
    #

    Auto and Homeowners Insurance: Is AARP Looking Out for You?

    Last Updated Oct 9, 2009 1:34 PM EDT

    The way insurance companies barrage you with television ads promising to save you money, you might think they were paying you instead of the other way around. In the case of the GEICO googly eyes or actor Dennis Haysbert hawking Allstate policies, at least it’s private companies pitching their wares. But then there are the auto insurance ads touting the $388 saved, on average, by people who switched to plans offered through AARP by The Hartford Financial Services Group. The ads also say that AARP members who own homes might save an additional $148 by switching their homeowners coverage. In this case, the trusted nonprofit is lending its name to a commercial venture. Pay less, get the AARP imprimatur. What’s not to like? Read on to find out.

    As part of our continuing analysis of AARP s financial services products (earlier stories covered AARP mutual funds and AARP life insurance and annuities ), we wondered how well the huge organization was treating its 40 million members with the homeowners and auto policies it sells. So we examined the coverage and compared AARP/The Hartford prices with those of Allstate, State Farm, GEICO, and Progressive in three zip codes to answer the question, Should you put AARP on your policy shopping list?

    Our answer: If you are shopping on price alone, no. You can save money in some cases a lot of money by taking your business elsewhere. But the policies do offer a few appealing features that you might find are more than worth the extra cost. And The Hartford has an impressive customer service record.

    AARP has marketed The Hartford s homeowners and auto policies for 25 years and deserves credit for choosing a quality partner. The Hartford was among the top five insurers in J.D. Power and Associates 2008 homeowners and auto insurance customer service surveys. They have a reputation for working with their customers and trying to solve problems without litigating claims, compared to some of their competitors, says Amy Bach, executive director of United Policyholders. a San Francisco-based organization that advocates for consumers on home and auto insurance. The number of complaints filed against The Hartford, as tracked by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, is below the industry average and has been declining for the past several years.

    Middling Marks for Prices

    AARP s homeowners and auto policies are often not the least expensive, however, which echoes what we found with its life insurance offerings. There is a cost to having some of the features in the program, acknowledges Richard Hisey, president of AARP Financial, the for-profit arm of AARP. We believe that if you re comparing apples-to-apples features, we will be cost-competitive.

    For our price-shopping survey, we asked AARP/The Hartford, Allstate, State Farm, GEICO, and Progressive for quotes for a 53-year-old AARP member driving a 2008 Nissan Rogue and living in a $250,000 wood-frame house. And since the cost of the same insurance can vary by zip code, we requested quotes in Charlotte, N.C.; Scottsdale, Ariz.; and Schaumburg, Ill. We told the insurers to apply any standard auto discounts available based on his driving record and profile. Since AARP s auto rates were for 12 months and the others were for six months, we divided AARP s figures in half.

    For auto insurance, AARP/The Hartford was the priciest insurer in Scottsdale and Schaumburg and in the middle of the pack in Charlotte. Progressive was the least expensive in Scottsdale, costing a whopping 42 percent less than AARP/The Hartford. GEICO was the cheapest in both Charlotte and Schaumburg, charging 28 percent less and 15 percent less, respectively, than AARP/The Hartford.

    Auto Insurance Six-Month Premium


    Auto Leasing: Sweet Car Deals on Lease Takeovers – CBS News #auto #speakers


    #auto lease deals
    #

    Auto Leasing: Sweet Car Deals on Lease Takeovers

    Last Updated Jun 1, 2011 1:24 PM EDT

    Let’s say you are itching for a new and different car, maybe one with much better gas mileage. But a visit to the dealership turned up a limited selection and a high selling price. Why not stall? By taking over a lease with a year or two until expiration, you can delay your next purchase until the new-car inventory situation improves.

    “Production issues in Japan have triggered price increases across the board for all makes, foreign and domestic,” says CEO Jeremy Anwyl of auto information site Edmunds.com. “The average price of a new Honda Civic, for example, has gone up more than $1,600 since March.” Looking at a lease-swapping deal is one of several ways Edmunds suggests shoppers avoid buying an overpriced new car now.

    Lease holders frequently need to get out of their current leases, and for a variety of reasons — from financial setbacks to a growing family that won’t fit in that sporty convertible. The web site LeaseTrader.com handled 75,000 of these swaps last year. Traditionally, the leases being offered have been for BMW, Mercedes-Benz or other luxury brands, because leasing is more prevalent among luxury cars. “But now we are seeing more leases [offered] for small, high-gas-mileage cars,” says John Sternal, a vice president of LeaseTrader.com.

    For instance, among current offerings are several for the Toyota Prius, one of the cars hardest hit by Japanese supply disruptions. One especially low-payment deal is for a silver 2010 Prius in Miami; the lease is $210 a month, with 22 months left to run. If you needed a shorter lease, a blue 2008 model in the New York City suburbs has payments of $355 a month but just nine months to go.

    Beyond the possibility of getting a higher-MPG car now, picking up a lease can be a chance to try out a luxury model you are considering but not yet ready to commit to. There’s a 2009 BMW 535 iXdrive sedan in San Ramon, Calif. for instance, with monthly payments of $699 and 13 months to run.

    So how does the transfer process work?

    • LeaseTrader charges moderate fees. Shoppers pay $39 initially; if they complete a deal, there’s a $149 fee for the paperwork involved in the transfer. Before doing any deal, however, inquire about transfer fees from the bank or leasing company that holds the lease: That transfer fee can be as little as $50 or as much as $600.
    • Transfers work best in the same geographic region. If you can drive with a friend or fly one-way inexpensively and then pick up the car, it minimizes costs. LeaseTrader can set up cross-country transfers for you, but the price runs about $1,000.
    • Get an inspection if you can’t see the car. If you are considering a lease swap from far away, make sure the car is in good shape by hiring a professional inspector. (See Should You Buy a Car You Haven’t Seen? )

    If lease swapping doesn’t seem right for you, Edmunds is offering some additional suggestions for avoiding the high price and tight selection of the current new-car market:

    Just Be Patient. If the car you are driving is still serviceable, patience is a virtue. Most analysts believe that by early or mid-2012, automakers will have solved the supply problems for new cars and the parts that go into them. That should mean better selection and much better prices at the dealership.

    Extend Your Own Lease. If you are leasing now and that lease is near expiration, see if the leasing company will consider extending your lease by six months or so. That should put you in a better situation for a new lease or purchase.

    Don’t Jump for a Used Car. When new car prices are high, buyers traditionally have switched to less-expensive used cars. But this year, limited supply has caused used car prices to shoot up. (See Used Car Prices Surging .)

    Whatever your situation, analyze your costs carefully before making any commitment. For instance, calculate the likely gas savings from getting a higher-MPG car. Gas will remain expensive. But it already has dropped from its peak near $4 national average for regular to below $3.80. Don’t let your annoyance at high pump prices push you into an ill-advised move.

    Photos courtesy of the manufacturers

    2011 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.