Car Refinance, Auto Loan Refinancing, OpenRoad Lending, auto financing calculator.#Auto #financing #calculator


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Auto lease calculator#Auto #lease #calculator


Auto Lease Calculator

Auto lease calculator

The Auto Lease Calculator can help estimate monthly lease payments based on total auto price or vice versa.

Auto Leases

A car lease allows a person to drive a car for a fixed period of time as they make monthly payments until the lease ends. It helps to think of it as a long-term car rental.

Quick Tip: Try not to terminate leases before their terms end, as heavy penalties will soon follow.

Generally, upkeep of regular maintenance such as oil changes are covered under warranties. Expenses for replacing worn car parts such as brakes or tires may fall to the lessee. However, faults attributed to the lessee (such as collisions of their doing) will most likely come out of their own pocket. Be sure to read the lease terms carefully as maintenance rules from lease to lease can differ greatly.

Most leases have mileage limits that penalize the lessee once the car is driven over the limit; they range anywhere from 5 to 20 cents per mile over.

Several things are required to calculate the monthly lease on any vehicle:

  • Auto Price or Capitalized Cost It is possible to try and negotiate this figure down (same strategy used for buying cars) for a more affordable lease. As a matter of fact, many experts claim it is better to negotiate with car salesmen as if buying the car outright, and only when a desired figure is reached should a potential lessee reveal that they intend to lease the car and not buy.
  • Money Factor This is sort of like interest rate, except applied specifically to car leases. Lessors use money factor as a way to hand out leases with rates corresponding to each lessee’s credit history. They generally work very similarly: the worse the credit history of the lessee, the higher their money factor will be, and the pricier each lease gets. To get the money factor, divide the APR on the lease by 24 or 2400 depending on whether it is expressed as a decimal or percent.
  • Lease Term the length of the lease. Most leases run between 2 to 4 years, with the majority of them lasting for 3 years.
  • Residual Value Sometimes called lease-end value. In essence, the residual value of a car is the amount it can be bought for at the end of the lease. Financial institutions that issue lease contracts set residual values on vehicles, not the dealers. It is essentially their expert guess as to what will be the worth of the car after the lease ends. The difference between the price of the car minus residual value will result in the depreciation of the car after a lease, which is amortized throughout the lease loan. Therefore, auto leases tend to be more affordable for slowly-depreciating vehicles because they hold their residual values well.

Explanation of How the Calculator Computes Monthly Leases

A car leasable for 3 years has an agreed upon value of $25,000 after negotiations on the auto price (capitalized cost). The lending financial institution for the lease has placed a residual value of $12,500 on the car after the 3 years and has given the borrowing lessee an APR of 6% after a down payment of $5,000. Assume that the down payment is solely to reduce the capitalized cost, not as payment for any upfront fees. For simplicity’s sake, we will assume that all fees have already been rolled into the auto price. The lessee is also willing to trade in a used car with a value of $2,000, and the transaction occurs in a state with a 6% tax rate.

Quick Tip: As a general rule of thumb concerning leases, seek low selling prices, high residual values, and low money factors. The best combination of all of these will most likely result in the most affordable car lease.

First, arrive at a true figure for the capitalized cost. In order to do this, subtract any trade-ins or down payments from the agreed upon value of the car. If there are no trade-ins or down payments made, simply use the original agreed upon value.

$25,000 – $5,000 – $2,000 = $18,000

Subtract the residual value as supplied by the financial institution,

$18,000 – $12,500 = $5,500

This is the amount that must be amortized over the life of the lease. Simply divide by the term, 36 months, to get the monthly depreciation:

Next, convert APR into money factor. Remember to use 24 or 2400, depending on expression of rate as decimal or percent,

Sum the capitalized cost and residual value, then multiply by the money factor to get the monthly interest charge,

($18,000 + $12,500) 0.0025 = $76.25

Sum the monthly depreciation and the monthly interest, then multiply this figure by the tax rate to get the monthly tax amount. If there is no sales tax, simply ignore this step.

Finally, add all three charges together to arrive at the monthly lease payment amount:

$152.78 + $76.25 + $13.74 = $242.77

Lease vs. Buy

Included underneath the calculated lease information is data conveyed as if the car was purchased instead of leased. Right off the bat, it is easy to see that upfront payments and monthly payments are much higher for purchased cars.

A popular reason for leasing is when the leased car can be written off as a business expense. Because leases are defined by the IRS as an operating expense, they can potentially be deducted from taxes. For those that enjoy frequently experiencing new cars, it may make more sense to lease rather than pay in full each time . Sometimes, people only need a car for short periods due to moves. Others may need to minimize monthly car payments for the next two to four years due to a tight budget. For these situations, leasing is usually better than buying. However, in general, there are few instances where it makes more financial sense to lease than to buy . Just like with rent, when the lease ends, there is no equity built. Also, because there is never actual ownership of the car as it is still legal property of the lessor, the lessee may not do as they please to the car- there are certain restrictions in place regarding what modifications may be done. While it is an important and potentially complex decision, our Auto Lease Calculator can help evaluate whether or not to lease or buy.


Auto Loan Calculator, auto payment calculator.#Auto #payment #calculator


Auto Loan Calculator

Auto payment calculator

$372.86 / Month

The Auto Loan Calculator considers the most vital factors in order to calculate auto loan information. It assumes that the full purchase price is accounted for whether as down payment or part of the loan, along with any fees involved. If only the monthly payment for any auto loan is given, use the Monthly Payments tab (reverse auto loan) to calculate the actual vehicle purchase price and other auto loan information.

Important: Tax and fee procedures apply to car purchases within the US only. Foreigners may still use the calculator, but please adjust accordingly.

There are different definitions for different prices when it comes to car buying such as MSRP (manufacturer’s suggested retail price), selling price, blue book price, and dealer price. For any recently purchased or sold car, input the final selling price as the “Auto Price” figure. For hypothetical loans involving cars not being bought or sold, use blue book prices to arrive at close estimates for the values of the cars.

Purchases of cars usually come with costs other than the purchase price. Car buyers with low credit scores might be forced to pay the hefty fees upfront. The following is a list of common fees associated with car purchases in the US.

  • Sales Tax Most states in the US collect sales tax for auto purchases.
  • Document Fees This is a fee collected by the dealer for processing documents like title and registration. Typically, they run between $150 and $300.
  • Title and Registration Fees This is the fee collected by states for vehicle title and registration. Most states charge less than $300 for title and registration.
  • Advertising Fees This is a fee that the regional dealer pays for promoting the manufacturer’s automobile in the dealer’s area. If not charged separately, advertising fees are included in the auto price. A typical price tag for this fee is a few hundred dollars.
  • Destination Fee This is a fee that covers the shipment of the vehicle from the plant to the dealer’s office. This fee is usually between $600 and $1,000.
  • Insurance In the US, auto insurance is strictly mandatory to be regarded as a legal driver on public roads and is usually required before dealers can process paperwork. When a car is purchased via loan and not cash, full coverage insurance is mandatory. Auto insurance can possibly run more than $1,000 a year for full coverage. Most auto dealers can provide short-term (1 or 2 months) insurance for paper work processing so new car owners can deal with proper insurance later.

Important: If the fees are bundled into the auto loan, remember to check the box ‘Include All Fees in Loan’. If they are paid upfront instead, leave it unchecked.

Quick Tip 1: Should an auto dealer package any mysterious special charges into a car purchase, please demand justification and thorough explanations for their inclusion. This is not to say that well-intentioned car salesmen don’t exist, but there is a reason why this particular group of people get a bad rap as some of the most untrustworthy and scheming around. After all, their mission is to squeeze as much profit out of a potential car selling scenario as possible.

Auto Loans

Many people cannot afford to purchase cars with straight cash, so they turn to auto loans instead. They work as any generic, secured loan from a financial institution does with a typical term of 36 or 60 months. Each month, repayment of principal and interest must be paid to auto loan lenders from borrowers, excluding other mandatory fees and taxes (unless they have been intentionally included into the loan). Money borrowed from a lender that isn’t paid back can legally entitle a car to being repossessed.

Direct Lending vs. Dealership Financing

There are two financing options available: direct lending or dealership financing. With the former, it comes in the form of a typical loan originating from a bank, credit union, or financial institution. Getting pre-approved through a credit union is usually the best option and offers the lowest rates, especially for lifelong, good standing members.

Quick Tip 2: To aid ability to negotiate the best deals, take steps towards achieving healthier credit scores before taking out large loans for car purchases. Free annual credit reports can be requested from one of the three credit agencies: Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion.

Once a contract has been entered with a car dealer to buy a vehicle, the loan is used from the direct lender to pay for it. Dealership financing is somewhat similar except that the paperwork is done through them instead. The contract is retained by the dealer, but is sold to a bank or other financial institution called an assignee that ultimately services the loan.

Quick Tip 3: Direct lending usually offers more flexibility because there is competition between involved lenders to offer the best interest rates to the borrower, and rates tend to be better. It also provides more leverage for someone to walk into a car dealer with most of the financing done on their terms, as it places further stress on the car dealer to compete with a better rate. Getting pre-approved doesn’t tie car buyers down to any one dealership, and their propensity to simply walk away is much higher. With dealer financing, the potential car buyer has fewer choices, though it’s there for convenience for anyone who doesn’t want to waste time shopping around.

Quick Tip 4: It can be helpful for prospective car buyers to determine how much they can afford to spend on a car and what types of cars are within their budget before actually heading to a dealership. Knowing what kind of vehicle is desired will make it easier to research and find the best deals that suits a buyer’s needs. Once a particular make and model is chosen, it can be important to have some typical going rates in mind to enable effective negotiations with a car dealer. Car dealers, like many businesses, want to make as much money as possible from a sale, but often, given enough negotiation, are willing to sell a car for significantly less than the price they initially offer. Depending on whether a buyer chooses to pay for the vehicle with monthly payments, the “Monthly Payment” tab of our Auto Loan Calculator can be used to calculate the “true” cost of the car. A monthly payment option often ends up being more expensive than buying the car outright. However, if buying the car outright is not an option, it is up to the buyer’s discretion to determine whether the need for a car sooner justifies the additional cost of making monthly payments rather than saving until a later date to avoid said monthly payments. Furthermore, although the allure of a new car is understandable, buying a pre-owned car even if only a few years removed from new can usually result in significant savings, and is an option that prospective car buyers can consider.

Trade-in Value

Don’t expect too much value when trading in old cars to dealerships as credit towards newer car purchases; exchange rates tend to float somewhere akin to auction house levels, way below blue book values. Selling old cars privately beforehand and using the funds for future car purchases tends to result in a more financially-desirable outcome. However, convenience is important for many people and they choose to simply trade them in to dealerships during new car purchases.

Within the states that collect sales tax on auto purchases, most of them collect based on the difference between the new car and trade-in price. For a $25,000 new car purchase with a $10,000 valued trade-in, the tax paid on the new purchase with an 8% tax rate is:

$25,000 – $10,000 = $15,000 8% = $1,200

This is the default method by which the Auto Loan Calculator will calculate sales tax in accordance with Trade-in Value. However, some states do not offer any sales tax reduction with trade-ins, and they are:

Using the same example above, whereas if the new car was purchased in one of the places above without a sales tax reduction for trade-ins, the sales tax would be:

This comes out to be an $800 difference, enticing more people in these places to sell cars to private parties instead.

Vehicle Rebates

Dealers may offer vehicle rebates to further incentivize buyers. When car manufacturers are pressured into getting rid of cars at lower profit margins, it can be inferred that they probably use rebates as a means of doing so.

Depending on the state, they may or may not be taxed accordingly. For example, purchasing a vehicle at $30,000 with a cash rebate of $2,000 will have sales tax calculated based on the original price of $30,000, not $28,000. Luckily, a good portion of states do not do this and don’t tax cash rebates. They are Alaska, Arizona, Delaware, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah, Vermont, and Wyoming.

Generally, only purchases of new cars are offered rebates because of how uniform and consistent each new car is. Dealers know exactly to the cent where the breakeven point is and if they are still a wide margin over, they can incentivize a potential car buyer by offering a rebate. While some used car dealers do offer cash rebates, they are a rarity due to the difficulty of arriving at true value.

Quick Tip 5: New cars depreciate as soon as they are driven off the lot, sometimes by more than 10% of their values; this is called off-the-lot depreciation.


Interest Calculator, auto interest calculator.#Auto #interest #calculator


Interest Calculator

Our Interest Calculator can help determine the interest payments and final balances on not only fixed principal amounts, but also additional periodic contributions. There are also optional factors available for consideration such as tax on interest income and inflation. To understand and compare the different ways in which interest can be compounded, please visit our Compound Interest Calculator instead.

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Results

Interest is the compensation paid by the borrower to the lender for the use of money as a percent, or an amount. The concept of interest is the backbone behind most financial instruments in the world. While interest is earned, it is different from profit in that it is received by a lender as opposed to the owner of an asset or investment, though interest can be part of profit on an investment.

There are two distinct methods of accumulating interest, categorized into simple interest or compound interest.

Simple Interest

The following is a basic example of how interest works. Derek would like to borrow $100 (usually called the principal) from the bank for one year. The bank wants 10% interest on it. To calculate interest:

This interest is added to the principal, and the sum becomes Derek’s required repayment to the bank.

Derek owes the bank $110 a year later, $100 for the principal and $10 as interest.

Let’s assume that Derek wanted to borrow $100 for two years instead of one, and the bank calculates interest annually. He would simply be charged the interest rate twice, once at the end of each year.

$100 + $10(year 1) + $10(year 2) = $120

Derek owes the bank $120 two years later, $100 for the principal and $20 as interest.

The formula to calculate simple interest is:

interest = (principal) (interest rate) (term)

When more complicated frequencies of applying interest are involved, such as monthly or daily, use formula:

interest = (principal) (interest rate) (term) / (frequency)

However, simple interest is very seldom used in the real world. Even when people use the everyday word ‘interest’, they are usually referring to interest that compounds.

Compound Interest

Compounding interest requires more than one period, so let’s go back to the example of Derek borrowing $100 from the bank for two years at a 10% interest rate. For the first year, we calculate interest as usual.

This interest is added to the principal, and the sum becomes Derek’s required repayment to the bank for that present time.

However, the year ends, and in comes another period. For compounding interest, rather than the original amount, the principal + any interest accumulated since, is used. In Derek’s case:

Derek’s interest charge at the end of year 2 is $11. This is added to what is owed after year 1:

When the loan ends, the bank collects $121 from Derek instead of $120 if it were calculated using simple interest instead. This is because interest is also earned on interest.

The more frequently interest is compounded within a time period, the higher the interest will be earned on an original principal. The following is a graph from Wikipedia showing just that, a $1,000 investment at various compounding frequencies earning 20% interest.

Auto interest calculator

There is little difference during the beginning between all frequencies, but over time they slowly start to diverge. This is the power of compound interest everyone likes to talk about, illustrated in a concise graph. Continuous compound will always have the highest return, due to its use of the mathematical limit of the frequency of compounding that can occur within a specified time period.

The Rule of 72

Anyone who wants to estimate compound interest in their head may find the rule of 72 very useful. Not for exact calculations as given by financial calculators, but to get ideas for ballpark figures. It states that in order to find the number of years (n) required to double a certain amount of money with any interest rate, simply divide 72 by that same rate.

Example: How long would it take to double $1,000 with an 8% interest rate?

It will take 9 years for the $1,000 to become $2,000 at 8% interest. This formula works best for interest rates between 6 and 10%, but it should also work reasonably well for anything below 20%.

Fixed vs. Floating Interest Rate

The interest rate of a loan or savings can be “fixed” or “floating”. Floating rate loans or savings are normally based on some reference rate, such as the U.S. Federal Reserve (Fed) funds rate or the LIBOR (London Interbank Offered Rate). Normally, the loan rate is a little higher and the savings rate is a little lower than the reference rate. The difference goes to the profit of the bank. Both the Fed rate and LIBOR are short-term inter-bank interest rates, but the Fed rate is the main tool that the Federal Reserve uses to influence the supply of money in the U.S. economy. LIBOR is a commercial rate calculated from prevailing interest rates between highly credit-worthy institutions. Our Interest Calculator deals with fixed interest rates only.

Contributions

An important distinction to make regarding contributions are whether they occur at the beginning or end of compounding periods. Periodic payments that occur at the end have one less interest period total per contribution.

Tax Rate

Some forms of interest income are subject to taxes, including bonds, savings, and certificate of deposits(CDs). In the United States, corporate bonds are almost always taxed. Certain types are fully taxed while others are partially taxed; for example, while interest earned on U.S. federal treasury bonds may be taxed at the federal level, they are exempt at the state and local level. Taxes can have very big impacts on the end balance. For example, if Derek saves $100 at 6% for 20 years, he will get:

This is tax-free. However, if Derek has a marginal tax rate of 25%, he will end up with $239.78 only because the tax rate of 25% applies to each compounding period.

Inflation Rate

Inflation is defined as an increase in the general level of prices, where a fixed amount of money will relatively afford less. The average inflation rate in the United States in the past 100 years has hovered around 3%. As a tool of comparison, the average annual return rate of the S ?>

Auto Loan Calculator, auto interest calculator.#Auto #interest #calculator


Auto Loan Calculator

Auto interest calculator

$372.86 / Month

The Auto Loan Calculator considers the most vital factors in order to calculate auto loan information. It assumes that the full purchase price is accounted for whether as down payment or part of the loan, along with any fees involved. If only the monthly payment for any auto loan is given, use the Monthly Payments tab (reverse auto loan) to calculate the actual vehicle purchase price and other auto loan information.

Important: Tax and fee procedures apply to car purchases within the US only. Foreigners may still use the calculator, but please adjust accordingly.

There are different definitions for different prices when it comes to car buying such as MSRP (manufacturer’s suggested retail price), selling price, blue book price, and dealer price. For any recently purchased or sold car, input the final selling price as the “Auto Price” figure. For hypothetical loans involving cars not being bought or sold, use blue book prices to arrive at close estimates for the values of the cars.

Purchases of cars usually come with costs other than the purchase price. Car buyers with low credit scores might be forced to pay the hefty fees upfront. The following is a list of common fees associated with car purchases in the US.

  • Sales Tax Most states in the US collect sales tax for auto purchases.
  • Document Fees This is a fee collected by the dealer for processing documents like title and registration. Typically, they run between $150 and $300.
  • Title and Registration Fees This is the fee collected by states for vehicle title and registration. Most states charge less than $300 for title and registration.
  • Advertising Fees This is a fee that the regional dealer pays for promoting the manufacturer’s automobile in the dealer’s area. If not charged separately, advertising fees are included in the auto price. A typical price tag for this fee is a few hundred dollars.
  • Destination Fee This is a fee that covers the shipment of the vehicle from the plant to the dealer’s office. This fee is usually between $600 and $1,000.
  • Insurance In the US, auto insurance is strictly mandatory to be regarded as a legal driver on public roads and is usually required before dealers can process paperwork. When a car is purchased via loan and not cash, full coverage insurance is mandatory. Auto insurance can possibly run more than $1,000 a year for full coverage. Most auto dealers can provide short-term (1 or 2 months) insurance for paper work processing so new car owners can deal with proper insurance later.

Important: If the fees are bundled into the auto loan, remember to check the box ‘Include All Fees in Loan’. If they are paid upfront instead, leave it unchecked.

Quick Tip 1: Should an auto dealer package any mysterious special charges into a car purchase, please demand justification and thorough explanations for their inclusion. This is not to say that well-intentioned car salesmen don’t exist, but there is a reason why this particular group of people get a bad rap as some of the most untrustworthy and scheming around. After all, their mission is to squeeze as much profit out of a potential car selling scenario as possible.

Auto Loans

Many people cannot afford to purchase cars with straight cash, so they turn to auto loans instead. They work as any generic, secured loan from a financial institution does with a typical term of 36 or 60 months. Each month, repayment of principal and interest must be paid to auto loan lenders from borrowers, excluding other mandatory fees and taxes (unless they have been intentionally included into the loan). Money borrowed from a lender that isn’t paid back can legally entitle a car to being repossessed.

Direct Lending vs. Dealership Financing

There are two financing options available: direct lending or dealership financing. With the former, it comes in the form of a typical loan originating from a bank, credit union, or financial institution. Getting pre-approved through a credit union is usually the best option and offers the lowest rates, especially for lifelong, good standing members.

Quick Tip 2: To aid ability to negotiate the best deals, take steps towards achieving healthier credit scores before taking out large loans for car purchases. Free annual credit reports can be requested from one of the three credit agencies: Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion.

Once a contract has been entered with a car dealer to buy a vehicle, the loan is used from the direct lender to pay for it. Dealership financing is somewhat similar except that the paperwork is done through them instead. The contract is retained by the dealer, but is sold to a bank or other financial institution called an assignee that ultimately services the loan.

Quick Tip 3: Direct lending usually offers more flexibility because there is competition between involved lenders to offer the best interest rates to the borrower, and rates tend to be better. It also provides more leverage for someone to walk into a car dealer with most of the financing done on their terms, as it places further stress on the car dealer to compete with a better rate. Getting pre-approved doesn’t tie car buyers down to any one dealership, and their propensity to simply walk away is much higher. With dealer financing, the potential car buyer has fewer choices, though it’s there for convenience for anyone who doesn’t want to waste time shopping around.

Quick Tip 4: It can be helpful for prospective car buyers to determine how much they can afford to spend on a car and what types of cars are within their budget before actually heading to a dealership. Knowing what kind of vehicle is desired will make it easier to research and find the best deals that suits a buyer’s needs. Once a particular make and model is chosen, it can be important to have some typical going rates in mind to enable effective negotiations with a car dealer. Car dealers, like many businesses, want to make as much money as possible from a sale, but often, given enough negotiation, are willing to sell a car for significantly less than the price they initially offer. Depending on whether a buyer chooses to pay for the vehicle with monthly payments, the “Monthly Payment” tab of our Auto Loan Calculator can be used to calculate the “true” cost of the car. A monthly payment option often ends up being more expensive than buying the car outright. However, if buying the car outright is not an option, it is up to the buyer’s discretion to determine whether the need for a car sooner justifies the additional cost of making monthly payments rather than saving until a later date to avoid said monthly payments. Furthermore, although the allure of a new car is understandable, buying a pre-owned car even if only a few years removed from new can usually result in significant savings, and is an option that prospective car buyers can consider.

Trade-in Value

Don’t expect too much value when trading in old cars to dealerships as credit towards newer car purchases; exchange rates tend to float somewhere akin to auction house levels, way below blue book values. Selling old cars privately beforehand and using the funds for future car purchases tends to result in a more financially-desirable outcome. However, convenience is important for many people and they choose to simply trade them in to dealerships during new car purchases.

Within the states that collect sales tax on auto purchases, most of them collect based on the difference between the new car and trade-in price. For a $25,000 new car purchase with a $10,000 valued trade-in, the tax paid on the new purchase with an 8% tax rate is:

$25,000 – $10,000 = $15,000 8% = $1,200

This is the default method by which the Auto Loan Calculator will calculate sales tax in accordance with Trade-in Value. However, some states do not offer any sales tax reduction with trade-ins, and they are:

Using the same example above, whereas if the new car was purchased in one of the places above without a sales tax reduction for trade-ins, the sales tax would be:

This comes out to be an $800 difference, enticing more people in these places to sell cars to private parties instead.

Vehicle Rebates

Dealers may offer vehicle rebates to further incentivize buyers. When car manufacturers are pressured into getting rid of cars at lower profit margins, it can be inferred that they probably use rebates as a means of doing so.

Depending on the state, they may or may not be taxed accordingly. For example, purchasing a vehicle at $30,000 with a cash rebate of $2,000 will have sales tax calculated based on the original price of $30,000, not $28,000. Luckily, a good portion of states do not do this and don’t tax cash rebates. They are Alaska, Arizona, Delaware, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah, Vermont, and Wyoming.

Generally, only purchases of new cars are offered rebates because of how uniform and consistent each new car is. Dealers know exactly to the cent where the breakeven point is and if they are still a wide margin over, they can incentivize a potential car buyer by offering a rebate. While some used car dealers do offer cash rebates, they are a rarity due to the difficulty of arriving at true value.

Quick Tip 5: New cars depreciate as soon as they are driven off the lot, sometimes by more than 10% of their values; this is called off-the-lot depreciation.


Current Auto Loan Interest Rates, auto interest calculator.#Auto #interest #calculator


Current Auto Loan Interest Rates

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Auto Loan Calculator, loan calculator auto.#Loan #calculator #auto


Auto Loan Calculator

Loan calculator auto

$372.86 / Month

The Auto Loan Calculator considers the most vital factors in order to calculate auto loan information. It assumes that the full purchase price is accounted for whether as down payment or part of the loan, along with any fees involved. If only the monthly payment for any auto loan is given, use the Monthly Payments tab (reverse auto loan) to calculate the actual vehicle purchase price and other auto loan information.

Important: Tax and fee procedures apply to car purchases within the US only. Foreigners may still use the calculator, but please adjust accordingly.

There are different definitions for different prices when it comes to car buying such as MSRP (manufacturer’s suggested retail price), selling price, blue book price, and dealer price. For any recently purchased or sold car, input the final selling price as the “Auto Price” figure. For hypothetical loans involving cars not being bought or sold, use blue book prices to arrive at close estimates for the values of the cars.

Purchases of cars usually come with costs other than the purchase price. Car buyers with low credit scores might be forced to pay the hefty fees upfront. The following is a list of common fees associated with car purchases in the US.

  • Sales Tax Most states in the US collect sales tax for auto purchases.
  • Document Fees This is a fee collected by the dealer for processing documents like title and registration. Typically, they run between $150 and $300.
  • Title and Registration Fees This is the fee collected by states for vehicle title and registration. Most states charge less than $300 for title and registration.
  • Advertising Fees This is a fee that the regional dealer pays for promoting the manufacturer’s automobile in the dealer’s area. If not charged separately, advertising fees are included in the auto price. A typical price tag for this fee is a few hundred dollars.
  • Destination Fee This is a fee that covers the shipment of the vehicle from the plant to the dealer’s office. This fee is usually between $600 and $1,000.
  • Insurance In the US, auto insurance is strictly mandatory to be regarded as a legal driver on public roads and is usually required before dealers can process paperwork. When a car is purchased via loan and not cash, full coverage insurance is mandatory. Auto insurance can possibly run more than $1,000 a year for full coverage. Most auto dealers can provide short-term (1 or 2 months) insurance for paper work processing so new car owners can deal with proper insurance later.

Important: If the fees are bundled into the auto loan, remember to check the box ‘Include All Fees in Loan’. If they are paid upfront instead, leave it unchecked.

Quick Tip 1: Should an auto dealer package any mysterious special charges into a car purchase, please demand justification and thorough explanations for their inclusion. This is not to say that well-intentioned car salesmen don’t exist, but there is a reason why this particular group of people get a bad rap as some of the most untrustworthy and scheming around. After all, their mission is to squeeze as much profit out of a potential car selling scenario as possible.

Auto Loans

Many people cannot afford to purchase cars with straight cash, so they turn to auto loans instead. They work as any generic, secured loan from a financial institution does with a typical term of 36 or 60 months. Each month, repayment of principal and interest must be paid to auto loan lenders from borrowers, excluding other mandatory fees and taxes (unless they have been intentionally included into the loan). Money borrowed from a lender that isn’t paid back can legally entitle a car to being repossessed.

Direct Lending vs. Dealership Financing

There are two financing options available: direct lending or dealership financing. With the former, it comes in the form of a typical loan originating from a bank, credit union, or financial institution. Getting pre-approved through a credit union is usually the best option and offers the lowest rates, especially for lifelong, good standing members.

Quick Tip 2: To aid ability to negotiate the best deals, take steps towards achieving healthier credit scores before taking out large loans for car purchases. Free annual credit reports can be requested from one of the three credit agencies: Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion.

Once a contract has been entered with a car dealer to buy a vehicle, the loan is used from the direct lender to pay for it. Dealership financing is somewhat similar except that the paperwork is done through them instead. The contract is retained by the dealer, but is sold to a bank or other financial institution called an assignee that ultimately services the loan.

Quick Tip 3: Direct lending usually offers more flexibility because there is competition between involved lenders to offer the best interest rates to the borrower, and rates tend to be better. It also provides more leverage for someone to walk into a car dealer with most of the financing done on their terms, as it places further stress on the car dealer to compete with a better rate. Getting pre-approved doesn’t tie car buyers down to any one dealership, and their propensity to simply walk away is much higher. With dealer financing, the potential car buyer has fewer choices, though it’s there for convenience for anyone who doesn’t want to waste time shopping around.

Quick Tip 4: It can be helpful for prospective car buyers to determine how much they can afford to spend on a car and what types of cars are within their budget before actually heading to a dealership. Knowing what kind of vehicle is desired will make it easier to research and find the best deals that suits a buyer’s needs. Once a particular make and model is chosen, it can be important to have some typical going rates in mind to enable effective negotiations with a car dealer. Car dealers, like many businesses, want to make as much money as possible from a sale, but often, given enough negotiation, are willing to sell a car for significantly less than the price they initially offer. Depending on whether a buyer chooses to pay for the vehicle with monthly payments, the “Monthly Payment” tab of our Auto Loan Calculator can be used to calculate the “true” cost of the car. A monthly payment option often ends up being more expensive than buying the car outright. However, if buying the car outright is not an option, it is up to the buyer’s discretion to determine whether the need for a car sooner justifies the additional cost of making monthly payments rather than saving until a later date to avoid said monthly payments. Furthermore, although the allure of a new car is understandable, buying a pre-owned car even if only a few years removed from new can usually result in significant savings, and is an option that prospective car buyers can consider.

Trade-in Value

Don’t expect too much value when trading in old cars to dealerships as credit towards newer car purchases; exchange rates tend to float somewhere akin to auction house levels, way below blue book values. Selling old cars privately beforehand and using the funds for future car purchases tends to result in a more financially-desirable outcome. However, convenience is important for many people and they choose to simply trade them in to dealerships during new car purchases.

Within the states that collect sales tax on auto purchases, most of them collect based on the difference between the new car and trade-in price. For a $25,000 new car purchase with a $10,000 valued trade-in, the tax paid on the new purchase with an 8% tax rate is:

$25,000 – $10,000 = $15,000 8% = $1,200

This is the default method by which the Auto Loan Calculator will calculate sales tax in accordance with Trade-in Value. However, some states do not offer any sales tax reduction with trade-ins, and they are:

Using the same example above, whereas if the new car was purchased in one of the places above without a sales tax reduction for trade-ins, the sales tax would be:

This comes out to be an $800 difference, enticing more people in these places to sell cars to private parties instead.

Vehicle Rebates

Dealers may offer vehicle rebates to further incentivize buyers. When car manufacturers are pressured into getting rid of cars at lower profit margins, it can be inferred that they probably use rebates as a means of doing so.

Depending on the state, they may or may not be taxed accordingly. For example, purchasing a vehicle at $30,000 with a cash rebate of $2,000 will have sales tax calculated based on the original price of $30,000, not $28,000. Luckily, a good portion of states do not do this and don’t tax cash rebates. They are Alaska, Arizona, Delaware, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah, Vermont, and Wyoming.

Generally, only purchases of new cars are offered rebates because of how uniform and consistent each new car is. Dealers know exactly to the cent where the breakeven point is and if they are still a wide margin over, they can incentivize a potential car buyer by offering a rebate. While some used car dealers do offer cash rebates, they are a rarity due to the difficulty of arriving at true value.

Quick Tip 5: New cars depreciate as soon as they are driven off the lot, sometimes by more than 10% of their values; this is called off-the-lot depreciation.


Auto Refinance Calculator – Will Refinancing Save You Money, Calculators by CalcXML, auto loan payoff calculator.#Auto #loan #payoff #calculator


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Should I refinance my auto loan at a lower rate?

Without increasing the term remaining on your existing loan, you will be able to save interest with a new loan at a lower rate. Use this auto refinance calculator to determine the monthly savings that could be realized by refinancing your auto loan at a lower rate yet keep the same remaining term.

Auto loan payoff calculator

This information may help you analyze your financial needs. It is based on information and assumptions provided by you regarding your goals, expectations and financial situation. The calculations do not infer that the company assumes any fiduciary duties. The calculations provided should not be construed as financial, legal or tax advice. In addition, such information should not be relied upon as the only source of information. This information is supplied from sources we believe to be reliable but we cannot guarantee its accuracy. Hypothetical illustrations may provide historical or current performance information. Past performance does not guarantee nor indicate future results.

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$372.86 / Month

The Auto Loan Calculator considers the most vital factors in order to calculate auto loan information. It assumes that the full purchase price is accounted for whether as down payment or part of the loan, along with any fees involved. If only the monthly payment for any auto loan is given, use the Monthly Payments tab (reverse auto loan) to calculate the actual vehicle purchase price and other auto loan information.

Important: Tax and fee procedures apply to car purchases within the US only. Foreigners may still use the calculator, but please adjust accordingly.

There are different definitions for different prices when it comes to car buying such as MSRP (manufacturer’s suggested retail price), selling price, blue book price, and dealer price. For any recently purchased or sold car, input the final selling price as the “Auto Price” figure. For hypothetical loans involving cars not being bought or sold, use blue book prices to arrive at close estimates for the values of the cars.

Purchases of cars usually come with costs other than the purchase price. Car buyers with low credit scores might be forced to pay the hefty fees upfront. The following is a list of common fees associated with car purchases in the US.

  • Sales Tax Most states in the US collect sales tax for auto purchases.
  • Document Fees This is a fee collected by the dealer for processing documents like title and registration. Typically, they run between $150 and $300.
  • Title and Registration Fees This is the fee collected by states for vehicle title and registration. Most states charge less than $300 for title and registration.
  • Advertising Fees This is a fee that the regional dealer pays for promoting the manufacturer’s automobile in the dealer’s area. If not charged separately, advertising fees are included in the auto price. A typical price tag for this fee is a few hundred dollars.
  • Destination Fee This is a fee that covers the shipment of the vehicle from the plant to the dealer’s office. This fee is usually between $600 and $1,000.
  • Insurance In the US, auto insurance is strictly mandatory to be regarded as a legal driver on public roads and is usually required before dealers can process paperwork. When a car is purchased via loan and not cash, full coverage insurance is mandatory. Auto insurance can possibly run more than $1,000 a year for full coverage. Most auto dealers can provide short-term (1 or 2 months) insurance for paper work processing so new car owners can deal with proper insurance later.

Important: If the fees are bundled into the auto loan, remember to check the box ‘Include All Fees in Loan’. If they are paid upfront instead, leave it unchecked.

Quick Tip 1: Should an auto dealer package any mysterious special charges into a car purchase, please demand justification and thorough explanations for their inclusion. This is not to say that well-intentioned car salesmen don’t exist, but there is a reason why this particular group of people get a bad rap as some of the most untrustworthy and scheming around. After all, their mission is to squeeze as much profit out of a potential car selling scenario as possible.

Auto Loans

Many people cannot afford to purchase cars with straight cash, so they turn to auto loans instead. They work as any generic, secured loan from a financial institution does with a typical term of 36 or 60 months. Each month, repayment of principal and interest must be paid to auto loan lenders from borrowers, excluding other mandatory fees and taxes (unless they have been intentionally included into the loan). Money borrowed from a lender that isn’t paid back can legally entitle a car to being repossessed.

Direct Lending vs. Dealership Financing

There are two financing options available: direct lending or dealership financing. With the former, it comes in the form of a typical loan originating from a bank, credit union, or financial institution. Getting pre-approved through a credit union is usually the best option and offers the lowest rates, especially for lifelong, good standing members.

Quick Tip 2: To aid ability to negotiate the best deals, take steps towards achieving healthier credit scores before taking out large loans for car purchases. Free annual credit reports can be requested from one of the three credit agencies: Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion.

Once a contract has been entered with a car dealer to buy a vehicle, the loan is used from the direct lender to pay for it. Dealership financing is somewhat similar except that the paperwork is done through them instead. The contract is retained by the dealer, but is sold to a bank or other financial institution called an assignee that ultimately services the loan.

Quick Tip 3: Direct lending usually offers more flexibility because there is competition between involved lenders to offer the best interest rates to the borrower, and rates tend to be better. It also provides more leverage for someone to walk into a car dealer with most of the financing done on their terms, as it places further stress on the car dealer to compete with a better rate. Getting pre-approved doesn’t tie car buyers down to any one dealership, and their propensity to simply walk away is much higher. With dealer financing, the potential car buyer has fewer choices, though it’s there for convenience for anyone who doesn’t want to waste time shopping around.

Quick Tip 4: It can be helpful for prospective car buyers to determine how much they can afford to spend on a car and what types of cars are within their budget before actually heading to a dealership. Knowing what kind of vehicle is desired will make it easier to research and find the best deals that suits a buyer’s needs. Once a particular make and model is chosen, it can be important to have some typical going rates in mind to enable effective negotiations with a car dealer. Car dealers, like many businesses, want to make as much money as possible from a sale, but often, given enough negotiation, are willing to sell a car for significantly less than the price they initially offer. Depending on whether a buyer chooses to pay for the vehicle with monthly payments, the “Monthly Payment” tab of our Auto Loan Calculator can be used to calculate the “true” cost of the car. A monthly payment option often ends up being more expensive than buying the car outright. However, if buying the car outright is not an option, it is up to the buyer’s discretion to determine whether the need for a car sooner justifies the additional cost of making monthly payments rather than saving until a later date to avoid said monthly payments. Furthermore, although the allure of a new car is understandable, buying a pre-owned car even if only a few years removed from new can usually result in significant savings, and is an option that prospective car buyers can consider.

Trade-in Value

Don’t expect too much value when trading in old cars to dealerships as credit towards newer car purchases; exchange rates tend to float somewhere akin to auction house levels, way below blue book values. Selling old cars privately beforehand and using the funds for future car purchases tends to result in a more financially-desirable outcome. However, convenience is important for many people and they choose to simply trade them in to dealerships during new car purchases.

Within the states that collect sales tax on auto purchases, most of them collect based on the difference between the new car and trade-in price. For a $25,000 new car purchase with a $10,000 valued trade-in, the tax paid on the new purchase with an 8% tax rate is:

$25,000 – $10,000 = $15,000 8% = $1,200

This is the default method by which the Auto Loan Calculator will calculate sales tax in accordance with Trade-in Value. However, some states do not offer any sales tax reduction with trade-ins, and they are:

Using the same example above, whereas if the new car was purchased in one of the places above without a sales tax reduction for trade-ins, the sales tax would be:

This comes out to be an $800 difference, enticing more people in these places to sell cars to private parties instead.

Vehicle Rebates

Dealers may offer vehicle rebates to further incentivize buyers. When car manufacturers are pressured into getting rid of cars at lower profit margins, it can be inferred that they probably use rebates as a means of doing so.

Depending on the state, they may or may not be taxed accordingly. For example, purchasing a vehicle at $30,000 with a cash rebate of $2,000 will have sales tax calculated based on the original price of $30,000, not $28,000. Luckily, a good portion of states do not do this and don’t tax cash rebates. They are Alaska, Arizona, Delaware, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah, Vermont, and Wyoming.

Generally, only purchases of new cars are offered rebates because of how uniform and consistent each new car is. Dealers know exactly to the cent where the breakeven point is and if they are still a wide margin over, they can incentivize a potential car buyer by offering a rebate. While some used car dealers do offer cash rebates, they are a rarity due to the difficulty of arriving at true value.

Quick Tip 5: New cars depreciate as soon as they are driven off the lot, sometimes by more than 10% of their values; this is called off-the-lot depreciation.