Tricks of the trade: Insider tips for buying a new car – Covered mag, presented by, buying a new car.#Buying #a #new #car


Tricks of the trade: Insider tips for buying a new car

Buying a new car

  • 19 Feb, 2013
  • | by Chris Pollitt

With the latest registration mere weeks away, there’s a good chance plenty of you are looking forward to hitting the dealerships in the hope of filling your driveway or garage with a nice, shiny ‘13’ plate car.

With that in mind, we’ve compiled five insider tips to give you the confidence you need to not only walk into that showroom with your head held high, but to also help you save money.

1) Read the margins

Everyone knows that everything for sale has a profit margin within the retail price, and what you’ll be expecting next is for us to tell you that every new car carries huge margins meaning potential savings of thousands.

Well, sadly, we’re not, as new cars simply don’t have the margins you might think. So, be realistic when negotiating the price. If you demand £2,000 off, the salesman will have to say no – not because he’s playing hardball, but because he simply can’t do it.

Then there’ll be frustration, embarrassment and neither the dealership nor you will benefit.

Ask for £500 off, though, and you should be onto a winner – the dealer isn’t going to lose your business over that.

2) Factory fresh?

On delivery day, would you be able to spot the difference between a car that was built three months ago and a car that received its final nuts and bolts three weeks ago? No, we couldn’t either.

Yet people still deem ordering a ‘factory build’ as the best thing ever. If the dealer tells you he’s found a car in group stock that’s built, he’s trying to help you get your car faster.

Unless you absolutely have to have it painted in that shade of green the manufacturer put in the brochure for a bet, or if you simply must have the £600 optional sat-nav that’s made to look like an antique next to any modern £149 offering, consider giving it a miss.

Physical stock is your friend. It’s built, it’s waiting for you and it’s an asset to the manufacturer, and an asset they need to sell. Factories build cars no matter what – there’s no reason to offer you a discount when it’s still a steel sheet.

3) A question of time

If we could show you a monthly or quarterly projection for a dealer’s business, you’d probably make some sort of spluttery, panicked noise. Basically, they have to make a hell of a lot of money and brilliantly, they normally don’t worry about it until the last minute.

Walk into a dealership on the last weekend (or better yet, the last day) of the month and salesmen will fall over backwards to do you a deal. Walk in at the end of a quarter, though, and you’ll be treated like royalty. You will almost certainly be offered all manner of discounts, but please don’t snort in derision when the salesman tells you they only apply if the car is registered that month. He’s not lying.

That car you’ve fallen in love with becomes ‘just’ stock as soon as the calendar hits the 1st, and the salesman won’t be in the mood to do an amazing deal, as he’ll be getting a telling off from his sales manager because the dealership missed their target.

4) Mind the GAP. and the paint protection

It’s no secret the dealer is going to try and sell you extras with your shiny new car, the main two being GAP (Guaranteed Asset Protection) and some kind of paint protection.

The dealer is going to want you to take these things. You’ll be told how amazing they are and you’ll be told you simply must have them.

Well, GAP can be quite a good thing to have, but maybe not from the dealer, because it’ll be about £400 – far more expensive than it should be.

For those of you who don’t know, GAP is normally a three year policy which, at its core, will return you to the amount you paid for the car in the event of a total loss by making up the ‘GAP’ between the invoice price and whatever the current market value is at the time the car is written off. But you don’t need to pay £400 for it.

A quick internet search will turn up no shortage of reputable companies who can offer you GAP from £150 for three years of cover.

Speaking of searching on the internet, you can run a quick car insurance quote on the hop with your mobile device – if you have one that is – while you’re at the dealership, so you can know how much you should by paying for your annual cover. Handy, that.

As for paint protection, well, it’s normally around £300. But here’s a secret: washing and waxing your car keeps it clean, not a £300 bag of ‘miracle’ polish that cost the dealership £50.

5) The part exchange

It’s the simplest thing to overlook in the buying process because it is, after all, the car you’re getting rid of. But while it may be of no further interest to you, it can still hugely useful.

The dealer will offer you what feels like £4.99 for the car you’ve cherished for the last five years, so why not sell it yourself? You may be in a prime position, too, as all you need to do is get more than what the dealer offers.

Try getting the dealer to appraise your car and put a value on it – there’s no obligation to include your car within the deal – then, when you’ve scoffed at their offer, simply advertise it for around 15-20% more than the dealer’s figure and wait.

Your increase on the dealer’s offer may still undercut most other private sales and you’ll also have more money to put towards that shiny new car.

With these tips, you may be able to save a huge amount of money, but there is just one thing to remember, and that’s the fact that you’re in control all the way.

The dealer wants your business and they’ll do anything to get it, but that’s a good thing

Ignore the clichés and stereotypes – the dealer wants you to not only buy, but to buy when you next want a new car and to also recommend their services.

It’s a buyer’s paradise out there, and with these tips at hand, you’re all set to grab a bargain!


Where to buy a new car – Money Advice Service, buying a new car.#Buying #a #new #car


Where to buy a new car

When buying a new car, you can choose between using a car dealership or a car broker. Both have different advantages and drawbacks, so here are the facts you need to know before deciding.

Buying a new car from a dealer

Dealers are many people’s first choice when buying a new car, even though they don’t normally offer the kind of bargains possible through a car broker.

Here are the reasons for their popularity, along with a few drawbacks you need to consider.

Pros of buying from a dealer

Did you know?

A pre-registered or ‘nearly new’ car is a brand new car is heavily discounted because it has already had one owner – the dealer.

Dealers register new cars to themselves to get bonuses from manufacturers for hitting monthly sales targets, then sell the cars at reduced prices to shift stock.

  • Your consumer rights are stronger when you buy from a dealer.
  • Face-to-face customer service.
  • You can part-exchange your current car.
  • You can test drive and check the car.
  • Dealers can offer the widest choice of cars, and your exact specification.
  • If you have any problems with your new car, your dealer is likely to be local and so available to talk to in person.

Cons of buying from a dealer

  • You’ll have to negotiate to get the best deal.
  • You might not get the best part-exchange deal – you’ll get more selling your car privately.
  • If you buy a pre-registered car, you are unlikely to get “new car replacement” cover from your car insurer in case your car is written off in the first year you own it.

Buying a new car from a broker

Top tip

If you buy a pre-registered car, make sure this hasn’t affected the manufacturer’s warranty in any way.

Car brokers claim they can offer savings of up to £5,000 off a car’s list price.

This is because of the discounts manufacturers give them for selling a target volume of cars and because there’s no salesman’s commission involved.

Most are online, though some have premises as well. Brokers tend to offer cars they’ve pre-registered after delivery by the manufacturer, or to source new cars from dealers.

Pros of buying from a broker

  • Savings of thousands of pounds are available.
  • Most will have the model and options you require.
  • Your new car will be delivered to your door.
  • No haggling because you’re unlikely to be able to negotiate and will usually have to pay the advertised price.

Cons of buying from a broker

  • Most brokers operate online, so you can’t just pop round to talk to them if you have problems with your new car.
  • You probably won’t be able to part-exchange when selling your old car opens in new window .
  • Some brokers might not be able to offer as wide a choice of cars as a dealership, or the full list of optional extras.
  • If you buy a pre-registered car you’re in effect its second owner, which can affect the car’s value when you come to sell it.
  • Brokers can’t offer the face-to-face service a dealer provides.
  • You can’t test drive the car, so would need to go to a main dealer to do this.

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  • 10 Steps To Buying A Used Car – Kelley Blue Book, buying used car.#Buying #used #car


    10 STEPS TO BUYING A USED CAR

    Before considering the purchase of a used car, it is wise to establish the amount you are willing to spend or, if taking a loan, calculate your maximum monthly payment – and then make a firm commitment to stay within that amount.

    Buying used car

    You may also want to consider an extended warranty plan. Chances are an extended warranty or service contract will be offered to you by the dealership. An extended warranty covers a wide range of repairs and services. The repairs can be done at any authorized dealership and tend to be easily approved. You won’t pay a penny for approved repairs unless your contract includes a deductible. You can also purchase an extended warranty from an independent company that could cost less than an extended service contract from a manufacturer.

    Many professionals will tell you that this is where huge numbers of buyers make their biggest mistakes. They don’t buy the vehicle that is best for their needs, but instead get smitten with something that doesn’t fulfill their requirements, costs far too much money or, typically, both. Figuring out how much you want to spend was the easy part; now you have to find the vehicle that’s right for you. But most buyers (yes, most), are not really sure what’s out there or even what they need and want. Here are some suggestions: First, make a list of all the things you need your vehicle to do (haul kids, go off-road, get good gas mileage, be absolutely reliable, maintain good re-sale value, be easy to park) and then make a second list of all the things you admire in a vehicle (body style, colors, luxury options). Cross-reference the two. You should end up with a list of required and desired characteristics, which you can use to eliminate models that won’t work for you (you can’t haul kids in a two-seat sports car or operate a full-size sport utility vehicle on an economy-car fuel budget).

    There is a lot of information available on the internet but, many professionals will tell you, most buyers simply don’t use that available information to their best advantage. To help, we’ve developed a couple of decision guides for refining your search. The Compare New Cars feature will put up to four new or used vehicles side by side for you to compare.


    10 Steps To Buying A Used Car – Kelley Blue Book, buying a used car.#Buying #a #used #car


    10 STEPS TO BUYING A USED CAR

    Before considering the purchase of a used car, it is wise to establish the amount you are willing to spend or, if taking a loan, calculate your maximum monthly payment – and then make a firm commitment to stay within that amount.

    Buying a used car

    You may also want to consider an extended warranty plan. Chances are an extended warranty or service contract will be offered to you by the dealership. An extended warranty covers a wide range of repairs and services. The repairs can be done at any authorized dealership and tend to be easily approved. You won’t pay a penny for approved repairs unless your contract includes a deductible. You can also purchase an extended warranty from an independent company that could cost less than an extended service contract from a manufacturer.

    Many professionals will tell you that this is where huge numbers of buyers make their biggest mistakes. They don’t buy the vehicle that is best for their needs, but instead get smitten with something that doesn’t fulfill their requirements, costs far too much money or, typically, both. Figuring out how much you want to spend was the easy part; now you have to find the vehicle that’s right for you. But most buyers (yes, most), are not really sure what’s out there or even what they need and want. Here are some suggestions: First, make a list of all the things you need your vehicle to do (haul kids, go off-road, get good gas mileage, be absolutely reliable, maintain good re-sale value, be easy to park) and then make a second list of all the things you admire in a vehicle (body style, colors, luxury options). Cross-reference the two. You should end up with a list of required and desired characteristics, which you can use to eliminate models that won’t work for you (you can’t haul kids in a two-seat sports car or operate a full-size sport utility vehicle on an economy-car fuel budget).

    There is a lot of information available on the internet but, many professionals will tell you, most buyers simply don’t use that available information to their best advantage. To help, we’ve developed a couple of decision guides for refining your search. The Compare New Cars feature will put up to four new or used vehicles side by side for you to compare.


    Buy and sell new – used cars safely, buying used cars.#Buying #used #cars


    385,411 used cars for sale

    With history-checked cars and innovative search options, there are many ways Motors.co.uk can help you to find your next vehicle. We list a wide range of new and used cars for sale from trusted dealers, so you can be confident of finding the right car for your needs.

    Buying used cars

    Find the perfect used car

    Whether you’re searching for what’s available in your local area or performing a quick search by make and model, the Used Cars page provides a clear picture to help you research your car purchase.

    Buying used cars

    Vehicle history checks for cars vans

    For your peace of mind while searching, nine out of ten cars listed on Motors.co.uk have been given a basic History Check. This checks whether the car has previously been imported, stolen, scrapped or written off.

    Buying used cars

    The benefits of the ‘Smart Search’

    If you’re not quite sure which make and model best suits your needs, our ‘Smart Search’ is a great way to find your next car. Whether you’re searching new or used, simply select the features you’d like from the range of options and our ‘Smart Search’ will do the rest.

    Latest News

    Motoring news from around the country

    NASA asks Uber to develop flying taxi technology

    Buying used cars

    Uber has teamed up with NASA to begin the development of a flying taxi. The taxi app firm has confirmed that it is the first ever company to work alongside NASA on a programme that is related to low-altitude air space travel rather than outer space. Chief product officer Jeff.

    BMW reveals limited-edition M3 CS

    Buying used cars

    BMW has lifted the lid on its all-new M3 CS – a more aggressive and more powerful variant of the standard M3 saloon. On-board is a 3.0-litre twin-turbocharged six-cylinder engine producing 454bhp, a jump of 10bhp over the standard car. From standstill to 60mph takes just 3.7 seconds – half.

    Tiredness at the wheel compared to drink driving

    Buying used cars

    Scientists have discovered that sleep deprivation causes your brain cells to switch off while awake – and it could happen to you while driving. However, it also affects other aspects of your life, from forgetting where your car keys are to a lack of concentration – which could lead to.

    Latest Guides

    Hints tips for happy motoring

    Choosing cars from Motors.co.uk’s trusted dealers

    Motors.co.uk works with a nationwide network of trusted new and used car dealers. This means you can search by location and be confident that there is something available in your local area that will suit your requirements.

    Selling or buying your next car with Motors.co.uk

    Buying and selling your vehicle is now even easier through Motors.co.uk. You can quickly and easily set up your own My Garage account to advertise your vehicle for sale at no cost, and use our free car valuation service, ‘Whats Mine Worth?’, to find out how much my car is worth. This gives you an instant, no-obligation offer which can also act as a guide to selling for free through Motors.co.uk.

    ‘Ask an Expert’ – get the latest know-how from industry experts

    Our ‘Ask an Expert’ library of videos and guides contains top car industry professionals offering their advice and tips the most essential inspection checks, what to look out for during your test drive and how to negotiate the best deal. Plus, have your questions answered in a video Q A, and a downloadable Buying Guide which includes guidance on making your purchase.

    The cars people are buying

    Our regularly updated ‘What s Hot?’ page gives you a detailed breakdown of the trending manufacturers and models over the last few days. On the ‘What s Hot?’ page, Motors.co.uk details the 10 best-selling cars of the week.

    Popular second hand cars!

    Want to know the most popular used car models searched on Motors.co.uk?

    Click on the following links to see our most popular models as searched by you

    Top used car manufacturers

    Looking for a specific manufacturer

    We have them all. Click on the following links to see our most popular manufacturer pages as searched for by you.

    Motors.co.uk Limited is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FRN 695329).

    Motors.co.uk is a credit broker and works with credit brokers, lenders and their appointed representatives (such as car dealers) and may receive payments for displaying financial offers or commission for applications or completed loans from its partners.

    Motors.co.uk does not contract directly with consumers on any finance application.

    Motors.co.uk Limited, registered in England No. 05975777, VAT No. GB 721 758 333. Registered Office Central House, Leeds Road, Rothwell, LS26 0JE.

    Buying used cars


    Guide to Buying a Used Car, buying used cars.#Buying #used #cars


    Guide to Buying a Used Car

    Our goal is to give you the most up-to-date, accurate information about your state DMV’s processes. The date you see here reflects the most recent time we’ve verified this information with your state DMV. When they change something, we do, too!

    Compare Your Financing Options

    Take the guesswork out of buying a new car—a variety of personalized loan options are just a click away!

    Just because a car isn’t new doesn’t mean it can’t be new to you. Buying a used car can be just as exciting as purchasing a brand new model. Unfortunately, getting a used vehicle can also be just as complicated as figuring out which new car would suit you best. That’s why we’ve compiled this guide to help you.

    Set a Budget

    Before you can start used car shopping, you should figure out your budget. This will help your process in many respects—including setting the right expectation for the types of used vehicles you can purchase.

    There are a few key factors to keep in mind while you’re number crunching.

    Personal Budget Factors

    It’s very important to have a realistic idea not only of what you can spend, but also of what you should spend on a used car. Just because you can afford it doesn’t mean it’s a good option for you.

    It’s generally suggested to spend no more than 20% of your monthly take-home pay on a monthly auto payment. However, this is just a broad recommendation and may not apply to every circumstance.

    Keep all your other monthly expenses in mind, such as:

    • Rent or mortgage.
    • Utilities.
    • Groceries.
    • Phone and Internet bills.
    • Student loans/other debts.

    If your monthly budget is mostly spent after taking care of necessary bills, it may be more prudent to keep your car payments on the lower side.

    Used Car “Hidden” Costs

    Owning a vehicle entails more than paying for the vehicle itself. There will be costs associated with your used car other than your monthly auto payment, such as:

    • Your car insurance rate.
    • Various taxes and fees.
    • Your car’s depreciation rate.
    • Gas, oil changes, and other maintenance.

    Don’t forget to keep these factors in mind when determining your used car budget.

    For more help on putting together the best payment plan for you, check out our used car taxes and fees calculator and browse our guide to creating a budget.

    Narrow the Search

    Once you have a solid idea of how much money you can spend on your used car, you can start determining which type of car within that price range will be the best option for you.

    Types of Used Cars

    There are plenty of used vehicles to go around, and several ways to generally categorize them. When you begin your shopping process, consider these options:

    • Certified pre-owned (CPO) vehicles—The purpose of CPO programs is to alleviate concerns about the condition of a non-new vehicle. Still, the inspections, repairs, and warranties involved in each program vary greatly. Make sure to read our guide on certified pre-owned vehicles for more information.
    • “Second tier” vehicles—These cars may not be the biggest sellers on the lot, but can still be reliable—and much cheaper—regardless of their less-popular manufacturers.
      • i.e. the Honda Accord and Toyota Camry are comparable in quality to the Chevrolet Malibu or Nissan Altima, but can cost much more.

    Usage Considerations

    Another good way to begin narrowing your search is figuring out how you will mostly be using the car.

    For example, if you have a large family, you might want to consider a vehicle with more seating; if you have a long commute, you may want to focus on cars that get the best gas mileage.

    Be honest with yourself, and separate the features you need in your car from the features you simply want.

    Shop for a Used Car

    You know what you want and how much you can spend, so now it’s time to figure out where to find this vehicle. There are a few methods to find the best used car near you.

    Online Forums

    If you love to do research or have a decent amount of car-related knowledge, you may have good luck looking for a used car on websites like Craigslist.

    Peer-to-peer car buying and selling websites are another option. These sites essentially act as a middleman between buyer and seller. The process is similar to using Craigslist, but sales are typically more regulated by the website.

    There are other less active online options, as well. Many websites will offer used car listings, which will allow you to search for vehicles based on factors like:

    In Person

    Of course, there are other ways to track down used cars for sale, including:

    • Used car lots.
    • Used sections of a car dealership.
    • Newspaper or magazine classified ads.

    These methods typically involve more legwork but may be a good option to find deals that a buyer only using the Internet might miss.

    Negotiating Used Car Prices

    The price of a car, new or used, is almost always up for debate. If you put your negotiating skills to the test, you may be able to save some serious money when purchasing your used car.

    Your number one ally at the negotiation table is information. Make sure you have a solid idea of the vehicle’s general value, including:

    • The Blue Book value. The Kelley Blue Book is one of the most common references for used car values.
    • Prices of vehicles with similar:
      • Makes.
      • Model years.
      • Miles.

    The specific price of the car will depend on other variables, like the condition the car is in and the vehicle’s history.

    Also ask if you can take the car for a test drive before making your final decision to buy it. This may reveal issues you may have with the vehicle that you can’t discern from research alone.

    Buying from Dealers

    There may be several different factors in play when you purchase a used car from a lot or dealership, as opposed to a personal sale. Dealers usually have more information about and experience in vehicle sales and will typically stick to a bottom line.

    Dealerships will usually also consider other elements when in negotiations with you, such as:

    • A trade-in car, if you have one.
    • Down payments vs. monthly payments.
    • Auto warranties.

    Typically, it’s recommended to start the conversation with the total price you want to pay for the vehicle, rather than trying to figure out monthly payments off the bat.

    Negotiating with a dealer can be difficult or intimidating, so make sure to read up on our guide to negotiating before making an offer on your used car.

    Private Party Sales

    Negotiating with a private seller may be easier than talking to a dealer about the price you want to pay for your used car. Typically, an individual will have less experience in selling vehicles and will likely be more eager to get rid of their auto.

    Still, pursuing a private sale means you’re much more likely to purchase the car “as is”—making you financially responsible for any and all problems with the vehicle, known and unknown. Check our guide to buying a car “as is” for tips on how to best deal with this situation.

    Vehicle History Reports

    No matter who you buy your used car from, it is a smart idea to ask for the vehicle’s maintenance and crash history.

    A vehicle history report will reveal many points about the car that could help you not only negotiate a fair price for the vehicle, but also make an informed decision on whether or not it’s worth purchasing at all.

    Vehicle history reports use the car’s vehicle identification number (VIN) to turn up information about:

    • Lemon status.
    • Accident history.
    • Major repairs.
    • Lien and ownership history.
    • Warranties remaining on the car.
    • Mileage and miles per year.

    Buy Your Used Car

    You’ve successfully planned a budget, researched your needs, located your vehicle, and bargained for a good price. All that’s left is signing off on the dotted line.

    But before you do, make sure you have all of your paperwork in line. Then you can drive off into the sunset with your (almost) new ride.


    Guide to buying a new car, Auto Express, buying a new car.#Buying #a #new #car


    Guide to buying a new car

    Buying a new car

    Whether you buy through a dealer, broker, or supermarket, this guide contains our best tips on how and where to buy a new car

    In a world where pigs fly and the Great British summer consists of three glorious months of sunshine, a new car buyer would waltz into a dealer with a pile of cash, throw it onto the salesman’s desk, and get a great deal on his/her dream car with no doubts or complications to speak of.

    However, in reality car buyers will probably not experience such a simple, glorious passage to car ownership. Chiefly because, most people don’t have the cash to buy a car outright, and because there are such a large number of places to buy a car these days, where to start can seem the hardest part. Which is why Auto Express is here with this guide to help you buy your next car as easily as possible.

    With manufacturers launching new models all the time, the new car market has gotten quite crowded with SUVs, crossovers, hatchbacks, saloons, PHEVs, etc, etc. Equally so, the range of different options when it comes to where and how you buy a new car has expanded hugely. Your traditional franchised dealer networks are still strong, but so too are new car supermarkets, which offer a vast range of new models at a single convenient location. A On top of this, there is the option of new car brokers, which aim to source the best deal for you by acting as an intermediate between you and a seller.

    With these three sales options available to new car buyers, you really need to know the pros and cons of each. As a prospective buyer, you’ll need to consider what you want from the buying experience. Of course, the best price possible is an obvious priority, but do you need help choosing the right car for you? And what kind of finance are you willing to sign up to? Is the after-sales experience important? And are you happy to sacrifice some benefits in order to get a better deal?

    The different options have their own positive and negative points, so we’ve put together this straightforward guide to help you choose the best way for you to buy a new car. Click the links below or on the left to jump to the buying option that most appeals to you.

    If you’re after more car buying advice check out our guide to finding the best car finance deal .

    Guides to buying a new car

    Tell us about your car buying tips and experiences in the comments section below.


    Buying a new car, AA, buying a new car.#Buying #a #new #car


    Buying a new car

    In the market for a new motor

    Buying a new car gives you the latest advances in safety and security, comfort, performance and fuel efficiency. Plus you can have the engine and trim specifications you want.

    You’ll also get a manufacturer warranty, won’t have to face an MOT test for 3 years, and there may be special offers on servicing.

    But there are pitfalls to be avoided. Hidden extras can bring nasty surprises, and there’s the initial depreciation.

    So before you reach for the cash, make sure you’re prepared for the showdown at the showroom. Here’s the hit list.

    Work out your budget

    The basic cost of driving
    • Depreciation Aim to keep the car for at least 3 years to spread the loss in value.
    • Car insurance The premium could go up, so shop around for a new deal.
    • Car loan If you need one, arrange it before visiting the dealer, you’ll almost certainly get a better deal than their car finance.
    • Car tax Your new car will be taxed on its CO2 emissions in the first year, and then a standard rate from the second year depending on the engine type. If your new car has a list price of over 40,000, there’s an extra charge of 310 a year in the first 5 standard rate years.
    Are extras in the basic price?
    • Delivery and number plates.
    • Special features you want.
    Part exchanging your car
    • Haggling Beware, many dealers will have allowed for bargaining in their price.
    • Your car’s value It’s based on age, condition and mileage. You can check its valuation online.
    • The ‘cost to change’ If you negotiate a good discount on a new car, you’re unlikely to get a generous trade-in for your old car.
    • Selling privately You should get more than the part exchange, but it can be time consuming and stressful.
    • Be wary of advertised minimum trade-in offers They look attractive, but may be available only if you take the dealer’s car finance.

    Read the small print

    Spend some time going over the warranty conditions before you sign. For example, you may need to fork out for routine checks to ensure the long-term anti-corrosion warranty remains valid.

    Car manufacturers can’t insist that you get the car serviced by a franchise dealer during the warranty period. But you must still get it serviced according to their recommended schedule, using only manufacturer approved parts. And you’ll have to keep records so you can demonstrate to the manufacturer that servicing was undertaken to their requirements.

    It’s worth bearing in mind that if anything goes wrong shortly after the warranty expires, a manufacturer is more likely to show goodwill towards any claim if the car has been serviced by one of their dealers.

    And don’t be pressured into buying walk away if you’re not completely happy.


    Used Cars For Sale – Appraisals, Used Cars – Certified Pre-Owned Vehicles, Edmunds, buying used car.#Buying #used #car


    Used Cars For Sale

    Find used car inventory nearby

    Appraise a used car

    Research a used car

    about used cars

    If you’ve come here looking for a used or certified pre-owned car, truck, SUV, crossover, hatchback, hybrid or convertible, then you’re in the right place. Edmunds has everything you need to know about buying or selling a used vehicle, including Carfax vehicle history reports, dealership listings and pricing information, expert car reviews, consumer car reviews, car dealership reviews, car price comparisons, car appraisal calculators, images and videos, technical features and specs, user forums and more.

    At Edmunds, you’ll be able to browse thousands of used cars, trucks and SUVs for sale with special offers, appraise your current car, and research the car, SUV or truck of your dreams. You can limit your search to certified pre-owned (or CPO) vehicles for sale and be a click away from articles by our experts that will give you the best car shopping and buying tips and advice. Let’s take a closer look at each of these aids to easier used-car shopping.

    The INVENTORY tab at the top of the page allows you to browse used cars for sale from popular makes such as Ford, Honda, Toyota, Chevrolet, Hyundai, Infiniti, Acura and Subaru. The inventory tool allows you to cast a much wider net than simply visiting your local dealership’s website. Start with the make and model of the vehicle that you’re interested in. You’ll have the option to refine your search by price, distance, model year and mileage. If you’re looking for specific options or features, a certain trim level or a specific color, there are more advanced search filters available, including engine type, fuel type, drivetrain, powertrain, airbags, air-conditioning and much more. After you find the car, SUV, truck or hybrid that you’re interested in, select the listing to check out the VIN details page for that vehicle and get more information. There you’ll find a description of the vehicle from the dealer, vehicle features and options, contact information for that dealership, dealer reviews, a ballpark insurance estimate, and a link to see a Carfax vehicle history report.

    The APPRAISE tab at the top of the page lets you enter your car’s basic information, odometer reading, trim level, and overall condition. Then Edmunds provides you with the True Market Value (TMV) for your used car or vehicle. Edmunds’s True Market Value or used car value is is a great starting point for negotiation of a used-car sale between a private buyer and seller. This is an “as is” value that does not include any warranties. The final sales price depends on the car’s actual condition and local market factors. You can use this used car value estimate to price your car for sale or to negotiate a trade-in for a new, CPO, or previously owned car for sale from a local dealer. The used car value estimate is also useful for assessing retail pricing at a car dealer. You can try it out by clicking the “APPRAISE” tab, above. Once you enter your vehicle details, you will receive three estimates for your used car’s value: “Trade-in” is what you can expect a dealer to offer you for your used car; “Private Party” is what you might expect to earn if you sold the pre-owned vehicle yourself; and “Dealer Retail” is what you might expect to pay if you were buying this used model used at a dealership. If the vehicle is new enough, you’ll also see a price that says “Certified Used Price.” This price estimates what the dealership might sell it for as a certified pre-owned vehicle.

    The RESEARCH tab points you to our expert analysis of the make and model of the car you select. You can read our editors’ reviews and learn about each generation of the vehicle you’re interested in. From there, you can narrow the focus of your car buying research by selecting a particular model year and learning more by checking out photos of the cars, researching local dealership listings, car valuation, consumer reviews, editors’ reviews, pros & cons, features & specs, and safety information. That’s a world of information. And we’ve put it all right at your fingertips.

    Are you thinking about trading in your vehicle at the dealership or selling it yourself? Find out what your used car is worth with our True Market Value appraisal tool. Enter the year, make and model to get started. Make sure you know the options on your vehicle and the current odometer reading. Be honest about the condition level. Most cars will fall in the “average” to “clean” range.

    The appraisal tool will give you three prices: “Trade-in” is what you can expect a dealer to offer you. “Private Party” is what you might expect to earn if you sold the vehicle yourself. “Dealer Retail” is what you might expect to pay if you were buying this model used at a dealership. If the vehicle is new enough, you’ll also see a price that says “Certified Used Price.” This price estimates what the dealer might sell it for as a CPO vehicle.

    If you are hesitant about buying a traditional used car, you may want to consider a certified pre-owned vehicle. These vehicles tend to be newer, have gone through a more detailed inspection process and come with a limited warranty. The Edmunds inventory tool will have an option to sort the list to show only CPO vehicles. You can also go directly to the CPO cars page.

    Explore Car-Buying Articles: If you’re unsure about the next steps in buying a used car — or car buying in general — Edmunds has research articles that can help. Take a look at those we’ve linked to on this page, or visit our research main page for a full list of articles that have been written by Edmunds car-shopping experts.

    Select from the options below, then review features, road tests and more.

    Or browse by car type

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    about used cars

    If you’ve come here looking for a used or certified pre-owned car, truck, SUV, crossover, hatchback, hybrid or convertible, then you’re in the right place. Edmunds has everything you need to know about buying or selling a used vehicle, including Carfax vehicle history reports, dealership listings and pricing information, expert car reviews, consumer car reviews, car dealership reviews, car price comparisons, car appraisal calculators, images and videos, technical features and specs, user forums and more.

    At Edmunds, you’ll be able to browse thousands of used cars, trucks and SUVs for sale with special offers, appraise your current car, and research the car, SUV or truck of your dreams. You can limit your search to certified pre-owned (or CPO) vehicles for sale and be a click away from articles by our experts that will give you the best car shopping and buying tips and advice. Let’s take a closer look at each of these aids to easier used-car shopping.

    The INVENTORY tab at the top of the page allows you to browse used cars for sale from popular makes such as Ford, Honda, Toyota, Chevrolet, Hyundai, Infiniti, Acura and Subaru. The inventory tool allows you to cast a much wider net than simply visiting your local dealership’s website. Start with the make and model of the vehicle that you’re interested in. You’ll have the option to refine your search by price, distance, model year and mileage. If you’re looking for specific options or features, a certain trim level or a specific color, there are more advanced search filters available, including engine type, fuel type, drivetrain, powertrain, airbags, air-conditioning and much more. After you find the car, SUV, truck or hybrid that you’re interested in, select the listing to check out the VIN details page for that vehicle and get more information. There you’ll find a description of the vehicle from the dealer, vehicle features and options, contact information for that dealership, dealer reviews, a ballpark insurance estimate, and a link to see a Carfax vehicle history report.

    The APPRAISE tab at the top of the page lets you enter your car’s basic information, odometer reading, trim level, and overall condition. Then Edmunds provides you with the True Market Value (TMV) for your used car or vehicle. Edmunds’s True Market Value or used car value is is a great starting point for negotiation of a used-car sale between a private buyer and seller. This is an “as is” value that does not include any warranties. The final sales price depends on the car’s actual condition and local market factors. You can use this used car value estimate to price your car for sale or to negotiate a trade-in for a new, CPO, or previously owned car for sale from a local dealer. The used car value estimate is also useful for assessing retail pricing at a car dealer. You can try it out by clicking the “APPRAISE” tab, above. Once you enter your vehicle details, you will receive three estimates for your used car’s value: “Trade-in” is what you can expect a dealer to offer you for your used car; “Private Party” is what you might expect to earn if you sold the pre-owned vehicle yourself; and “Dealer Retail” is what you might expect to pay if you were buying this used model used at a dealership. If the vehicle is new enough, you’ll also see a price that says “Certified Used Price.” This price estimates what the dealership might sell it for as a certified pre-owned vehicle.

    The RESEARCH tab points you to our expert analysis of the make and model of the car you select. You can read our editors’ reviews and learn about each generation of the vehicle you’re interested in. From there, you can narrow the focus of your car buying research by selecting a particular model year and learning more by checking out photos of the cars, researching local dealership listings, car valuation, consumer reviews, editors’ reviews, pros & cons, features & specs, and safety information. That’s a world of information. And we’ve put it all right at your fingertips.

    Are you thinking about trading in your vehicle at the dealership or selling it yourself? Find out what your used car is worth with our True Market Value appraisal tool. Enter the year, make and model to get started. Make sure you know the options on your vehicle and the current odometer reading. Be honest about the condition level. Most cars will fall in the “average” to “clean” range.

    The appraisal tool will give you three prices: “Trade-in” is what you can expect a dealer to offer you. “Private Party” is what you might expect to earn if you sold the vehicle yourself. “Dealer Retail” is what you might expect to pay if you were buying this model used at a dealership. If the vehicle is new enough, you’ll also see a price that says “Certified Used Price.” This price estimates what the dealer might sell it for as a CPO vehicle.

    If you are hesitant about buying a traditional used car, you may want to consider a certified pre-owned vehicle. These vehicles tend to be newer, have gone through a more detailed inspection process and come with a limited warranty. The Edmunds inventory tool will have an option to sort the list to show only CPO vehicles. You can also go directly to the CPO cars page.

    Explore Car-Buying Articles: If you’re unsure about the next steps in buying a used car — or car buying in general — Edmunds has research articles that can help. Take a look at those we’ve linked to on this page, or visit our research main page for a full list of articles that have been written by Edmunds car-shopping experts.

    Select from the options below, then review features, road tests and more.

    Or browse by car type

    Buying a used car

    Buying a used car

    Buying a used car

    Buying a used car

    Buying a used car

    Buying a used car

    Buying a used car

    Buying a used car

    Buying a used car

    Buying a used car

    Buying a used car

    Buying a used car

    Buying a used car

    Buying a used car

    Buying a used car

    Buying a used car