No Credit Check Loans – Look Before you Leap #bad #credit #auto #loans


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No Credit Check Loans

By Justin Pritchard. Banking/Loans Expert

Justin Pritchard helps consumers navigate the world of banking.

If your credit prevents you from getting a loan, it may be possible to borrow without relying on your credit history. However, you need to be careful when using no credit check loans. These loans are expensive, and they only make sense when all other options are off the table.

Do You Really Need One?

If they say no, that’s fine – you can always look at other options. But you never know for sure until you ask.

It’s important to understand that lenders aren’t in business to lose money. If anybody is willing to lend you money without checking your credit, they’re doing it for a price. Make sure you know what that price is before you apply. They’ll typically charge high interest rates along with various fees to compensate them for the risk. If you can avoid paying that price, do so.

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In general, it’s best to avoid no credit check loans unless you’re truly out of options. They should not be used to purchase “wants” or luxuries – they’re best for “needs.” If you need to fix your car so that you can keep getting to work (and earning an income), one of these loans might make sense. The same is true for a medical procedure that you have no other way of funding.

Types of Loans

No credit check loans are typically short term loans that you get relatively quickly. These generally aren’t loans that you’ll repay over several years; a few weeks or months is more common. They are very much like payday loans. which are expensive short-term loans. In fact, a lot of advertisements for no credit check loans are really just ads for payday loan programs. Lenders don’t make these lending decisions based on your credit score. Instead, they look at your income, and assume that you’ll keep your job long enough to pay off the loan.

Another common type of loan is a longer term loan that you get by pledging collateral. Car title loans. for example, allow you to borrow against the value of your automobile. The lender gives you cash, but in exchange you authorize them to take your vehicle if you fail to repay the loan on time. These loans can be especially problematic if you need your car to get to work and continue earning an income.

Avoid Scams

Borrowers looking to borrow without credit inquiries are desperate, so scammers are naturally easy to find in this space.

The most common scams involve charging fees while providing nothing in return. Application fees are not unheard of, but beware of lenders who want fees up-front – you might not get what you pay for. Fees should be clearly disclosed up-front. If you get any “surprises,” start worrying. Reputable lenders tell you what to expect, while scam artists just take what they can for as long as you’ll give it to them. Any fees should be taken out of your loan proceeds after your loan is approved.

You should also pay attention to what type of information your lender is asking for. Do they want your Social Security Number? Why do they need it if your credit doesn’t matter? They might end up running your credit (which can ding your credit scores) or using the information for identity theft. If you’re not 100% sure who you’re dealing with, keep your Social Security Number to yourself.

If it sounds too good to be true, it usually is. Keep an eye out for overly optimistic promises: nobody can “guarantee” you anything – especially if they don’t you (they need to know a few things about you before deciding whether or not to lend money). Remember also that these loans are always going to be expensive because they are risky loans to make. If you don’t see some hefty costs involved (a high interest rate. or loan processing fees that will be taken out of your loan proceeds), you’re probably not getting the whole picture.

Build Credit

In order to avoid these types of loans in the future, start building credit as soon as possible. Someday you’ll be able to borrow much less expensively, and you’ll have more options available to you (such as longer term loans and higher credit limits ) if you build credit. For more information, see How to Build Credit .

Title Check – Look before you buy #auto #train


#auto vin check
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Title Check – Look before you buy

Welcome to Title Check!

Here you can select an approved provider to check the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) of the vehicle you want to purchase to find out if it is salvaged, rebuilt, or was damaged in a flood. This is one of the most important steps you can take to protect yourself before making your purchase.

Here’s what you do to complete a Title Check:

  1. Get the VIN of the vehicle you want to buy.
  2. Have your credit card available.
  3. Select one of the approved providers below. Prices begin at only a couple dollars so you may want to shop the vendors before making a selection. Be sure to note what is offered for the price.
  4. Follow the steps to obtain the report.

The VIN is run through the National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS), a national consumer protection database that provides title information from states across the country. Whether you are buying from a local dealer, individual or eyeing a vehicle from an online auction website, it will help you to know what you are buying before you pay any money or sign any paperwork for the vehicle.

A report from the NMVTIS database gives you the vehicle’s title history, which includes whether the vehicle was ever in the possession of a junk or salvage yard or declared a “total loss” by an insurance company.

Protect your title, Texas.

    For Consumers

Before You Purchase Commercial Auto Business Insurance #brandywine #auto #parts


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Before You Purchase Commercial Auto Business Insurance

By Gregory Boop. Business Insurance Expert

Commercial auto insurance is one of the most important aspects of your business insurance program. If your business uses a vehicle, or many vehicles, you need commercial auto insurance and you will want to ask your business insurance professional some important questions. You will also want to provide your business insurance professional with a complete picture of your vehicle use.

How Many Vehicles and Drivers Will the Business Insure?

Commercial auto insurers often separate coverage types based on the number of vehicles and drivers to be insured. Fleet insurance is an option for businesses that will have a number of vehicles and drivers. The number of vehicles differs with each insurer and may depend on the class of vehicle. But, fleet insurance may be a less expensive alternative than individual, per vehicle policies.

What is the Policy Definition of Commercial Use?

Your personal auto policy will exclude coverage for commercial uses of your vehicle.

A commercial policy will establish a definition of commercial use as well. It is important that you read the definition and discuss this with your insurance professional. If there is any question, it is better to obtain a commercial auto policy so that, in case of an accident, there is no chance of being uninsured.

How Can You Lower Premium Costs?

Commercial auto business insurance premiums can be lowered by:

  • Business Location – the location of the vehicles determines premiums for theft.
  • Driver Records – hire only qualified drivers with safe driving records.

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  • Choice of Vehicle – sales people may want sports cars, but five-star safety rated, domestic, mid-sized sedans have the lowest premiums.
  • Deductibles – can your business afford part of the risk and maintain a high deductible? If so, your premiums will be lower.
  • Safety and Anti-Theft Devices – alarms, GPS tracking, air bags, seat belts, and other such devices can significantly lower premiums.
  • Insure U for Small Business Tips on Lowering Premiums

Special Commercial Coverages and Considerations.

Bankruptcy Auto Financing – Car Loans before, during, and after Bankruptcies #auto #collision #repair


#bankruptcy auto loans
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Get a Bankruptcy

If you’re going through or have filed for bankruptcy we can help .

Get Financed

The Process of Auto Financing Following Bankruptcy

If you’ve filed for bankruptcy, you might feel like you’ll never get approved for another line of credit again. Fortunately, that is not true. At Auto Credit Express. we have been helping bankrupt clients find bad credit car dealerships in their area to approve them for vehicle financing since 1999. Bankruptcy isn’t the end of the world. It’s a new beginning to financial stability

Open Bankruptcy Auto Loans

After you have filed your bankruptcy papers with the court, your bankruptcy is now considered open. It will remain that way until you receive your discharge papers from the judge. Open bankruptcy auto loans may be made available during this time with both Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcies. but with different requirements.

A chapter 7 bankruptcy is open for approximately three to four months making the process a little faster. Before you can apply for an auto loan through any subprime lender, you must make sure that your meeting of creditors has taken place. Legally, this is called the 341 meeting and allows the creditors listed on your BK papers to ask you questions about your debts. Lenders wait for this meeting to be completed before offering financing to debtors because:

  • After this meeting, you can no longer add debts to your bankruptcy petition, and therefore, the new car loan will not be discharged in the bankruptcy process.
  • Should your case be dismissed by your bankruptcy judge for any reason, you are still liable for the balance of the loan.
  • Your creditors have agreed to the terms of the bankruptcy and your debts will be extinguished, lowering your debt to income ratio.

After you have proof of completion, you can then apply for an online pre-approval at Auto Credit Express. Keep in mind, however, that because a Chapter 7 bankruptcy happens so quickly, your loan approval chances will significantly improve if you delay applying until you have your discharge papers.

If you’ve filed for Chapter 13, you have a little more leeway when it comes to car loans during bankruptcy. The process is much longer, lasting three or five years. The court appointed trustee will set up a payment plan based on your income, and you will repay a portion of your debts over the life of the bankruptcy. If you plan to apply for financing of any kind during this time, you must get approval through your trustee.

Compile a list of reasons as to why you need a new vehicle to present to the court. For example:

  • More than one person in the house has a job, so you need two cars.
  • One person works while the other drives kids to school or extra-curricular activities.
  • You have one car that is about to die, and you need a reliable vehicle for the family.

Once you have compiled your list, you must then file it with your trustee. This is called a Motion to Incur Additional Debt. Then you may have to answer questions about the vehicle you want to purchase. There could be stipulations added to the loan terms, including how long the loan is, what your interest rate can be, and what your monthly payment must be. If your motion is accepted, you will receive an Authorization to Incur Additional Debt. Once you are authorized, you can proceed with your purchase.

After Bankruptcy Car Financing

Taking out a new line of credit can be stressful regardless of what your credit score is, but when you have a recent bankruptcy on your report, your anxiety level can skyrocket. You don’t know how long you should wait, if you should wait, or if there is even a chance for an auto loan approval until the it falls off your credit report. We are here to tell you, you don’t have to wait or worry at all.

At Auto Credit Express, we understand that it isn’t always an option for you to wait weeks, months or years after bankruptcy before taking out an auto loan. This is why our network of lenders can offer you auto financing as soon as your discharge papers are in your hand. While most of our bad credit car dealerships offer both new and used vehicles, we highly recommend purchasing a pre-owned car, truck, SUV, or minivan. Late model automobiles generally offer the following benefits:

The used cars offered on our dealers’ lots are not the junky automobiles of yesteryear you may be thinking of. Instead, you will be financing a vehicle that is reliable, runs well and has low mileage.

“I never had anyone work so hard to find the best deal for my situation.” Deborah S. Ovid

Vehicle Options in Bankruptcy

Reaffirmation

If you decide to reaffirm your loan, you are signing a legally enforceable contract to repay the entire loan balance, as if the bankruptcy was not occurring. Both the creditor and debtor must agree on the terms, and usually a lender will not sign this document if you are currently behind on your payments, or have a history of late payments.

Before you make any decisions about keeping your vehicle, you must first gain permission from either the trustee or the judge working on your case. They must see that keeping the debt is not going to create a financial hardship on you or your family.

6 Things Every Sucker Should Know Before Buying a Used Car #mazda #auto #parts


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6 Things Every Sucker Should Know Before Buying a Used Car

By: Robert Brockway

| October 25, 2012

1,274,221 views 866

Buying a used car is like going to a dentist who wants to knock out your old teeth and sell you new ones. Everybody involved in the process is assuredly biased, possibly psychotic, and actively wants to do you bodily harm. More sad, dissatisfied people have left car dealerships than strip clubs, and it’s no wonder: Cars are extremely complicated, terribly expensive, and for some reason every one is guarded by a small gang of pathological liars. It’s one of the worst experiences of your life, and you need somebody trustworthy to help you. Unfortunately, you’ve got me. Lucky for you, I have bought and destroyed more cars than is technically allowable by the United States government, and am therefore legally obligated to actually try to help you in this column, which I do as a “service” to the “community.” I think we can get through this, if you take my advice to heart.*

*Well, except for all the times I tell you to “flip the table on them bitches.” That’s just some good general advice I try to work in everywhere, and may not be applicable to the situation at hand.

#6. Do Your Research

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Never, ever walk into a dealership “just to see what they’ve got.” Salesmen see that aimless stare on your face and they’re like starving cartoon wolves — they don’t even see a person; all they see is a giant walking turkey leg. Most small and midsize dealerships will have online inventories. Check those out in advance and start looking up the models you’re interested in, then read up on each one: Comb through car sites like Edmunds, click on forum posts by owners, get the specs and find out about users’ experience with reliability — hell, go to Wikipedia and bone up on the entire history of the model and the powertrain you’re considering. Back in school, you’d do the same amount of research for a book report on Huck Finn just because an older lady in a paneled skirt threatened you with the alphabet — you can do the same legwork for a multi-thousand-dollar purchase you’re going to entrust your life to every time you leave the house to get a burrito. Whatever you do, the point is to come in with a mental list: Do not let them steer you outside of that list to a car that you’re not familiar with. Adventure is wondrous and grand, but the used car lot is not the place to listen to strange old men in tattered clothes whisper of magical chariots.

“It’s dangerous to go alone. Take this Daihatsu!”

Now this is the important part, so pay attention: No matter what anybody tells you — no matter how respectable the source — never, ever, ever buy the Kia. Regardless of dealership affiliation, every used car lot on the planet has a dull red Kia out back that they want to show you. It’s going to feel wrong, somehow, like the air around it has gone stale. That’s the universe trying to warn you. There will be rational arguments, and your brain is gonna be all like, “Hey, it sounds like they’ve gotten a lot better lately,” and, “Look, even the car magazines think they’ve got some decent models.” But there’s a very simple explanation for this illusion: It’s a vast government conspiracy and everybody is in on it but me. They are terrible cars that will explode and betray you, no matter how meticulously you care for them. Isn’t that right, Optima, you fickle bitch?! You broke my heart! And for what? A measly 15,000 miles? I thought we had something! I spent two years inside of you. Does that mean nothing?!

#5. Dealing With the Dealer

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You need to treat the first few moments at a dealership like an old-timey mobster being interrogated by the coppers: You don’t say nothin’ about nothin’. Financing? What’s that? Trade-ins? Ha, what a hilarious portmanteau of gibberish! Price range? I don’t even speak English.

The first step is just and only to find the car you want, go over it carefully, take stock of any work that needs doing, and barter out the final price. Only when that’s all settled do you talk about trading in something. Why would you discuss trade-ins right up front if you haven’t even found a car you like? You’re not even sure you’re shopping there yet. The grocery store doesn’t pull you aside when you walk in the doors and ask how much you’re planning to spend today. So why do dealerships always want to know your price, payment and trades first? Because it gives them leverage against you: “Oh, well, if we’re going to do you a favor and take this trade-in off your hands, you have to buy one of these pre-selected vehicles.” Or, “Oh, you’re financing? Those aren’t our finance cars. Our finance cars are all dull red Kias; let’s go out back and take a look.”

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“Ignore the disembodied voices telling you to flee. That’s a. feature. Ghost-voicing. Costs extra.”

That’s bullshit. Everything is a finance car. Just like everything is a cash car. The car does not care how you pay for it. It is a car. Even if it becomes sentient, it’s mostly only going to care about fighting crime and ramping shit, like K.I.T.T. from Knight Rider. And brother, if that happens: You let it. You buy yourself a leather jacket and a perm and get the fuck out of there; your car search is over.

#4. Vehicle Inspection

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There are a few basic things you can check, even if you know nothing about cars. First thing you want to do is get right up close against the side of the front fender. (This should also serve to draw out any potential sentient-car crime-fighting partners, as they cannot resist wisecracking and will likely say something cute like, “Geez, buy me dinner first.” If so, then you’re done: It’s all cowhide coverings and curly hair for the rest of your days.) If there’s little to no rapport between you and the vehicle at this point, just sight down the trim lines to make sure they’re straight with no fluctuations — offset doors, fenders, and uneven lines could indicate frame damage. Look around the engine bay at the spots where the metal struts come together — the joints should be straight, with no signs of recent welding. Take a look underneath the car and watch for rust on the rails, in the wheel wells, or basically anywhere else. Be afraid of rust. Rust is the mind-killer. You’ll think you can take rust — it’s just some pansy little oxidation, right? But you can’t. Rust is better than you. Rust will laugh at your feeble angle grinders; it will spit at your steel wool and mock your puny acids. Rust will shrug off all your mightiest efforts and then, when you are broken, it will take your woman in a way that you never could.

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“F. from behind? I don’t know, man; I’m just a chemical process.”

Also remember to CHECK. THE. FUCKING. FLUIDS. Don’t just stare at the engine with your dick in your hand, wondering if you could stop the flywheel with your cock (no matter how awesome it would be to seize a V8 with nothing but your willpower and steely erection, this is not the time for it). Pull those dipsticks out and check the reservoirs. Brake fluid is, in an ideal world, clear to slightly yellowish. But the world we live in is broken and flawed, so it’s usually tea-colored. If it looks like strong coffee, you’re going to need to bleed the brake system, at the very least. That’s a few hundred dollars right there. It doesn’t require a lot of know-how or expensive parts, so you’re going to want to do it yourself.

Do not.

Bleeding brakes is exactly as traumatic as bleeding your only child, only it takes like, four times as long (depending on size and age of child). Check the oil: If it looks like a Wendy’s chocolate Frosty, just turn around and run. Run as fast as you can. Hop into your car and tear ass out of that dealership like The Dukes of Hazzard. That means a blown head-gasket, and it is death. If somebody assures you, “It’ll still run,” you can respond, “So will a man with no legs, if you shoot at him enough; that doesn’t mean he’ll get far.” (The casual murder references let ’em know you mean business.)

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“Hi, Bob. Nice to meet you. I’ve killed four men. Every one of them stole from me.”

Make sure the coolant is clear, the transmission fluid is red or purplish (just not black or oily) and all the belts and hoses are free of cracks. Finally, if it’s a new car or a big expense, you buy yourself a copy of a program like Torque, then go on eBay and get an ODBII scanner. Plug that into the car (the ODB slot is usually beneath the dash on the driver’s side) and you can see literally everything about its engine in real time, right there on your smartphone. Do me a favor and look at the salesman’s face when you do it: See that expression? That’s what hope looks like, as it leaves the world. He’s just realized he’s not going to win this one, because you’re from the future — you’ve already done this deal.

Title Check – Look before you buy #online #auto #loans


#auto vin check
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Title Check – Look before you buy

Welcome to Title Check!

Here you can select an approved provider to check the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) of the vehicle you want to purchase to find out if it is salvaged, rebuilt, or was damaged in a flood. This is one of the most important steps you can take to protect yourself before making your purchase.

Here’s what you do to complete a Title Check:

  1. Get the VIN of the vehicle you want to buy.
  2. Have your credit card available.
  3. Select one of the approved providers below. Prices begin at only a couple dollars so you may want to shop the vendors before making a selection. Be sure to note what is offered for the price.
  4. Follow the steps to obtain the report.

The VIN is run through the National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS), a national consumer protection database that provides title information from states across the country. Whether you are buying from a local dealer, individual or eyeing a vehicle from an online auction website, it will help you to know what you are buying before you pay any money or sign any paperwork for the vehicle.

A report from the NMVTIS database gives you the vehicle’s title history, which includes whether the vehicle was ever in the possession of a junk or salvage yard or declared a “total loss” by an insurance company.

Protect your title, Texas.

    For Consumers

Calculate Your Car Loan Payments Before You Decide on a Car #national #auto #rental


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Calculate Your Car Loan Payments Before You Decide on a Car

If you’re in the market for a new car (or even a used car that you can’t afford to buy with cash), you’re probably also in the market for a car loan. While car loans are usually much smaller than mortgages and home equity loans, the auto loan payments can still take a decent-sized bite out of your monthly household budget.

You therefore need to do your research in order to find the most affordable car loan with the most desirable payment terms. As part of that research, you’ll want to estimate what your monthly payments will be for various loan amounts at different interest rates.

Regardless of where the financing for your automobile purchase ultimately comes from, your credit scores will factor heavily into the interest rate you pay on your car loan. Much like mortgage brokers, car dealers need to ensure that loan applicants are ready, willing, and able to pay off a line of credit, so if you want to get financing through a car dealer, their loan department is going to run a credit check on you. That means checking out your credit reports and scores from at least one of the three major credit bureaus.

Car dealers find themselves in an interesting spot these days. They need to sell cars to stay in business, but their customers typically require loans to afford car purchases, and the consumer credit industry is still much tighter than it was before the Great Recession occurred.

Because of this dynamic, car dealers may be more willing to provide financing to consumers with poor credit scores than banks might be, but the basic lenders’ rule-of-thumb still applies: The lower your credit score is, the higher your interest rate will be and the bigger your monthly auto loan payments will be.

(Keep in mind that there’s another dynamic at play when you take out a loan of any kind. Your record of making, missing, or remitting late payments on that loan will appear on your credit report and factor into your credit score. Missed or delinquent auto loan payments can quickly drag down your credit score, which can affect your ability to renegotiate your car loan or acquire another line of credit.)

There are, of course, factors beyond your credit scores that help determine the ultimate amount of your monthly auto loan payments, including:

  • Dealer or manufacturer rebates. Rebates are usually offered at the end of a model year, when car dealers and carmakers try to reduce their inventory of unsold cars.
  • Trade-in allowances. Car dealers generally put a cap on how much they’re willing to reduce the selling price of a car when you trade in your current vehicle.
  • Your outstanding trade-in balance. If you’re trading in a car to the dealership where you originally bought it, and you still owe money on that car, the dealer will factor that amount into your loan application.
  • The size of your down payment. Obviously, the more money you put down upfront, the less you’ll need to borrow. Smaller car loans often mean better loan terms, because the lender’s risk is reduced.
  • Gap insurance. Gap insurance is typically required when a buyer offers little or nothing in the way of a down payment, especially if the buyer has poor credit. This insurance also protects the buyer, though; if your newly-bought car is totaled due to an accident, flood, or other calamity, you won’t be on the hook for the outstanding auto loan payments. If you finance through a dealership, any required gap insurance premiums are typically included in your monthly payments.
  • The loan term. Auto loans typically require full repayment within three to five years.
  • Your interest rate. As noted earlier, your credit scores will be used to determine the general range of your interest rate, but the factors listed above will also play a role.
  • Regardless of where you finance your car purchase, negotiating a car loan and determining your auto loan payments can be a complicated undertaking. Before you choose your next car, much less apply for a car loan, you should make every effort to estimate your auto payments as accurately as possible to help you determine how much you can afford to spend on your car purchase.

    FreeScore ‘s Auto Loan Calculator below can help you estimate your monthly auto loan payments. Through the calculator, you can enter any and all of the applicable information listed above to figure out how much you’ll end up paying for a car loan, including the total amount of interest you’ll pay over the life of the loan.

    10 Things to Know Before Replacing Your Central AC System #10 #things #before #replacing #ac, #ac #system #replacement, #guide #to #replacing #ac, #replacing #air #conditioner, #central #air, #central #air #conditioner


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    Homeowners

    10 Things You Should Know Before Replacing Your Central AC System

    Maybe your old central air conditioner has quit working, and you think you need a replacement. Maybe you want to upgrade to a more energy-efficient or environmentally-friendly system. Maybe you’re not sure what to do.

    Whatever the reason you’re considering a new air conditioner or furnace, you’ll want to go through this handy checklist to make sure you are shopping for the right equipment and asking contractors the right questions.

    1. How much time do I really have to replace my system?

    Click here to learn how to put time on your side to get the right equipment for your needs.

    2. Do I really need to replace my entire system or can it be repaired?

    Click here to see the many factors facing the repair vs. replace decision.

    3. How much space am I trying to cool (and has it changed since the old AC was installed)?

    Click here to learn how you might need more or less cooling and heating power based on changes in your home or workspace.

    4. Do I want something more than “just cold air”?

    Click here to read about how improvements in comfort, energy costs and the environment can make you feel better and save you money.

    5. Do I really need to cool the whole house all the time?

    Click here to see how some common suggestions can actually lead to bigger problems.

    6. Is there really anything new in air conditioning?

    Click here for an overview of new technologies available today and what they mean to you.

    7. Are there unique needs in my region of the country?

    Click here to see how where you live might determine the type of equipment you should buy.

    8. Should I replace my furnace if I replace my air conditioner?

    Click here to learn how your air conditioner and furnace work together… and apart.

    9. Should I invest in a programmable thermostat?

    Click here to see how you can save 20-30% on your energy bill without changing your routine.

    10. How do I know which contractor to hire?

    Click here for insights into how to ask the right questions and select the best contractor for your situation.

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    Used car checklist #insurance #before #buying #a #used #car


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    used car checklist

    From handy hints on how to spot if a car is stolen to alterations on the mileage, here’s our essential list of questions to ask, and items to check when you’re viewing a used car.

    If you buy a used car privately, it’s a case of ‘Buyer Beware’. You don’t have the same legal protection as when buying from a dealer. It’s up to you to ask the right questions and check the car thoroughly before you buy.

    If you don’t feel confident about carrying out any of these checks or if you just want a second opinion, we offer car checking services .

    Documents
    • Can the seller show you the V5C registration document? You won’t be able to tax the car without it.
    • Is the seller the registered keeper shown on the V5C? If not, why are they selling it for someone else?
    • Does the registration document have a watermark?
    • Any spelling mistakes on the registration document?
    • Do the VIN (vehicle identification number), engine number and colour match the V5C?
    • Does the number plate match the V5C?
    • Has the VIN plate been tampered with?
    • Do VIN numbers etched on glass or lights match the VIN plate and V5C?
    • Any sign of scratches on glass to remove etched-in marks?
    • Does the fuel filler look as if it has been forced or replaced?
    • Does the car have a current MOT (if the car’s more than three years old)? Check the MOT history and status of a vehicle »
    Mileage
    • Does the mileage, age and appearance of the car look consistent?
    • Any sign like worn screws that the instruments might have been tampered with? (Digital odometers can be tampered with electronically so clues like this won’t exist)
    • Check recorded mileage on service records, MOT ‘certificates’ and other documents.
    • Does it look consistent with current mileage/condition and increase steadily year on year?
    • Check MOT status and history online (with vehicle registration and make).
    Accident damage?
    • Any signs of inconsistent gaps between panels or mismatched colours that could be a sign of extensive repairs?
    • Is the paint finish even across the car?
    • Any traces of paint spray on handles, window seals or plastic mouldings?
    • Could the car’s colour have been changed? (Look under carpets and in other hidden areas in particular.)
    • Any unusual looking welding under the bonnet or in the boot?
    Safety
    • Are the tyres in good condition and all of the specification and dimensions? Tyres with less than 3mm of tread will have to be replaced soon.
    • Is the spare wheel or tyre inflator/sealant kit in serviceable condition?
    • Are the jack and other tools present?
    • Do all the seatbelts operate correctly? Check there are no cuts or fraying that could affect the way they work.
    • If airbags are fitted, Check that warning lights operate as described in the handbook – normally they will come on with the ignition and then go out?
    • Do all lights and windscreen wipers/washers work correctly?
    Test drive
    • Do all warning lights operate normally? Lights will generally come on to test and then go out – unless there’s a fault.
    • Are the brakes effective or does it take a long time or a lot of effort to stop?
    • Is braking even or does the car pull to one side?
    • Any unusual noises when you brake?
    • Is the handbrake effective?
    • Any steering vibration or pull to one side?
    • If ABS is fitted, does the warning light go out after the engine is started?
    Engine
    • Any abnormal noises when the engine is started from cold?
    • Does the oil warning light go out as soon as the engine starts?
    • Any signs of excessive visible exhaust emissions?
    • Does the clutch operate normally? A noise when you press the pedal or a high biting point could mean that repairs will be required soon.
    • Is the catalytic converter in good condition? Look for a recent emissions test, either alone or as part of an MOT. This will confirm that emissions are within the stringent limits applied to modern cars.
    • Is there sludge on the underside of the oil filler cap? This could indicate poor servicing or predominantly short journey use.
    • Is the oil level right? Too low shows neglect; too high could be a clue that the engine is using oil but it could just have been over filled in error.
    • Has the cam belt been replaced according to the service schedule?
    Locks, windows and general controls
    • Do all the locks, including central locking and remote control, work properly?
    • Do all windows, including any sunroof, open/close normally?
    • Any signs of forced entry, damaged or different locks, suggesting they’ve been replaced?
    • Have you got all the right keys? Check the handbook to see which keys were provided when the car was new. Modern keys are expensive to replace, particularly the coloured ‘master’ key provided by some manufacturers to programme new spare keys to the car.
    • Are locking wheel nuts fitted? Check that the special adapter required is included with the tool kit. Make sure it fits too.
    • Do all the minor controls operate correctly – heating, ventilation, air-conditioning, radio/CD, navigation etc?

    (Updated 9 November 2015)

    Oh no, you’re leaving!

    Bankruptcy Auto Financing – Car Loans before, during, and after Bankruptcies #police #auto #auction


    #bankruptcy auto loans
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    Get a Bankruptcy

    If you’re going through or have filed for bankruptcy we can help .

    Get Financed

    The Process of Auto Financing Following Bankruptcy

    If you’ve filed for bankruptcy, you might feel like you’ll never get approved for another line of credit again. Fortunately, that is not true. At Auto Credit Express. we have been helping bankrupt clients find bad credit car dealerships in their area to approve them for vehicle financing since 1999. Bankruptcy isn’t the end of the world. It’s a new beginning to financial stability

    Open Bankruptcy Auto Loans

    After you have filed your bankruptcy papers with the court, your bankruptcy is now considered open. It will remain that way until you receive your discharge papers from the judge. Open bankruptcy auto loans may be made available during this time with both Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcies. but with different requirements.

    A chapter 7 bankruptcy is open for approximately three to four months making the process a little faster. Before you can apply for an auto loan through any subprime lender, you must make sure that your meeting of creditors has taken place. Legally, this is called the 341 meeting and allows the creditors listed on your BK papers to ask you questions about your debts. Lenders wait for this meeting to be completed before offering financing to debtors because:

    • After this meeting, you can no longer add debts to your bankruptcy petition, and therefore, the new car loan will not be discharged in the bankruptcy process.
    • Should your case be dismissed by your bankruptcy judge for any reason, you are still liable for the balance of the loan.
    • Your creditors have agreed to the terms of the bankruptcy and your debts will be extinguished, lowering your debt to income ratio.

    After you have proof of completion, you can then apply for an online pre-approval at Auto Credit Express. Keep in mind, however, that because a Chapter 7 bankruptcy happens so quickly, your loan approval chances will significantly improve if you delay applying until you have your discharge papers.

    If you’ve filed for Chapter 13, you have a little more leeway when it comes to car loans during bankruptcy. The process is much longer, lasting three or five years. The court appointed trustee will set up a payment plan based on your income, and you will repay a portion of your debts over the life of the bankruptcy. If you plan to apply for financing of any kind during this time, you must get approval through your trustee.

    Compile a list of reasons as to why you need a new vehicle to present to the court. For example:

    • More than one person in the house has a job, so you need two cars.
    • One person works while the other drives kids to school or extra-curricular activities.
    • You have one car that is about to die, and you need a reliable vehicle for the family.

    Once you have compiled your list, you must then file it with your trustee. This is called a Motion to Incur Additional Debt. Then you may have to answer questions about the vehicle you want to purchase. There could be stipulations added to the loan terms, including how long the loan is, what your interest rate can be, and what your monthly payment must be. If your motion is accepted, you will receive an Authorization to Incur Additional Debt. Once you are authorized, you can proceed with your purchase.

    After Bankruptcy Car Financing

    Taking out a new line of credit can be stressful regardless of what your credit score is, but when you have a recent bankruptcy on your report, your anxiety level can skyrocket. You don’t know how long you should wait, if you should wait, or if there is even a chance for an auto loan approval until the it falls off your credit report. We are here to tell you, you don’t have to wait or worry at all.

    At Auto Credit Express, we understand that it isn’t always an option for you to wait weeks, months or years after bankruptcy before taking out an auto loan. This is why our network of lenders can offer you auto financing as soon as your discharge papers are in your hand. While most of our bad credit car dealerships offer both new and used vehicles, we highly recommend purchasing a pre-owned car, truck, SUV, or minivan. Late model automobiles generally offer the following benefits:

    The used cars offered on our dealers’ lots are not the junky automobiles of yesteryear you may be thinking of. Instead, you will be financing a vehicle that is reliable, runs well and has low mileage.

    “I never had anyone work so hard to find the best deal for my situation.” Deborah S. Ovid

    Vehicle Options in Bankruptcy

    Reaffirmation

    If you decide to reaffirm your loan, you are signing a legally enforceable contract to repay the entire loan balance, as if the bankruptcy was not occurring. Both the creditor and debtor must agree on the terms, and usually a lender will not sign this document if you are currently behind on your payments, or have a history of late payments.

    Before you make any decisions about keeping your vehicle, you must first gain permission from either the trustee or the judge working on your case. They must see that keeping the debt is not going to create a financial hardship on you or your family.

    Used Car Buying Tips – Guide for purchasing a used car in USA #insurance #before #buying #a #used #car


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    Used Car Buying Tips

    If you can’t get a loan or prefer not to make installment payments purchasing a used car outright may be a good option. However, when buying a used car, you have to be much more careful than when you buy a new car. In addition to the cost of the car, you will have to consider the cost of unexpected repairs. You may be able to get a better model with lower monthly payments if you buy a used car. Make sure to buy a car you can afford and leave some reserve money for emergencies.

    Most used cars don’t come with warranties. Even if the car had warranty, it may not be transferable to new owner. Even if there is warranty, it may not cover the things you need to get repaired.

    If you are buying a used car from a dealer for the first time, the salesman may give you hard time. Lenders generally will not approve car loans for used cars that are older than 5 years.

    Finding a Used Car

    Many local newspapers also advertise cars for sale. Some sellers display a sign on the car itself. It may be a good idea buy a used car from a rental car company. They usually sell their cars once they reach the age of 2 years, and they generally take good care of the cars. Even though the body might have some minor scratches, those cars are maintained well. They may not want to negotiate the price, and their prices may be little higher.

    After looking at various ads, short-list the cars you’re interested in. Call the seller as early in the day as possible and set up an appointment to look at the car. Make sure to go during the day, as it’s difficult to check out the car in the dark.

    After you’ve looked at the car, take a test drive. If you like the car and are fine with the price, you should tell the seller that you would like to have it checked by a mechanic. Don’t take the seller’s words for truth. There is no reason to feel shy about having the car looked at by a professional. You are making a big purchase decision. This will help you avoid a lot of mechanical problems and save you a lot of money later. Remember, once you buy the car, there is no return or money back.

    If the seller doesn’t let you test drive (make sure to take your driver’s license with you), you have no reason to buy the car. Also, check their driveway or parking space to see if there are any signs of leaks. Also, check the car’s A/C and heater.

    Typically, the best deals will be cars that are two or three years old, as they are still in relatively good condition and most of the depreciation (reduction in the value of the car) has already occurred.

    Certified used car dealers don’t really mean anything unless you are buying a certified pre-owned BMW, Lexus, or Mercedes and get a 3-month warranty. Never sign papers that indicate the car is AS IS.

    You should consider the current mileage when purchasing a used car. Of course, the fewer miles it has been driven, the better. An average of 12,000 miles per year is considered the norm. Of course, some cars are driven less than that, but many are driven much more due to long commuting distance. For example, a car manufactured in 2002 with a mileage of about 60,000 is considered fine in 2007. If a car has 110,000 miles or more, it is better to avoid purchasing it.

    Also, many miles driven on highways are better than many city miles.

    It may be difficult to find the true market value of a used car. Fortunately, there are various tools available to determine this. Kelley’s Blue Book is an excellent place to find used car values. The easiest way is to check online. However, many libraries, bookstores, and other similar places may have it available. It lists car models, year of make, variations, and the current value of the car. Of course, you may want to add or subtract the appropriate amount for features added later or those that do not work. Also, there is a cost deduction for additional mileage driven above the standard mileage. All of this information is mentioned in the Blue Book.

    The Blue Book gives a rough idea of a used car’s worth.

    If you have a used car checked by a mechanic, they may also be able to tell you the approximate value of the car.

    When you have a car checked by a mechanic and they find it needs repairs, ask the seller to have them fixed or discount the price of the car by the amount required for the repairs.

    You may also be able to negotiate the price of a used car. Often, it is more expensive to buy a used car from a dealer than from a private owner.

    Having A Car Checked

    Before buying a used car, it is absolutely necessary to have it first checked by a mechanic. Check the local Yellow Pages, search online, or ask a friend or colleague to recommend one. If you are a member of AAA. they can also recommend one. Mechanics may charge you $50 to $100 (it really varies). He/she will check the car thoroughly and tell you the current or potential problems, if any.

    Even though most mechanics know their job, make sure to have the following things checked:

    • All safety features, such as brakes, headlights, indicator lights, horn, and wipers are working correctly.
  • Check the brake cylinder and drum to see if there are any worn out pads
  • Check transmission and engine. They are usually the most expensive parts in a car.
  • Automatic cars may have either 4 speed or 5 speed. You should consider buying only 5 speed car.
  • Check whether there is any rust at the bottom, exhaust, radiators, and muffler.
  • Is there an oil leak? You can easily tell if there are any oil spots where the car was parked.
  • Does the car have enough power and pick up when accelerating?
  • Apply brakes at around 40mph and check for any vibrations without down-shifting. If there are, either brake pads or steering pinion may not be in good shape.
  • If possible, have four people sit in the car and take a sharp turn. This is a good way to find out if the suspension is in working order.
  • If the emission is black and thick, it means oil is burning with gas and the car is beyond its life. You should strongly consider NOT buying this car.
  • If the piston rings leave a gap in the cylinders, you shouldn’t buy the car. You will have to change the cylinder, piston, and rings, which is very expensive.
  • Ask the seller if they have records of maintenance or other work performed on the car, such as replacing and/or rotating tires, etc.
  • Don’t buy the car if it has already been sold to two or three prior sellers. Why is the car changing hands frequently? Is there something seriously wrong with it?
  • Check that the air filter, valves, etc. are fine.
  • Check that the interior is not too worn out. Sellers may just put new floor mats in, which are very cheap to replace. Underneath them, though, there may be worn out carpets.
  • Vehicle History Report

    Before you finally decide to buy a car, check the car’s history with CarFax or AutoCheck. It reveals whether the car has been in any accidents or whether the car was totaled or salvaged. It is not very expensive and is really worth it.

    You need a 17-digit VIN (Vehicle Identification Number) located on the metal strip on the dashboard to run the vehicle history. The VIN may also be located in other places, such as the engine, passenger door, driver side door, trunk, or hood. Make sure the VIN matches in every place.

    When you buy the car, make sure to collect the title. If the seller doesn’t have the title or promises to give you later, don’t buy the car. Every car owner must have a title. If the seller still has an outstanding loan on the car, you may go to the lender, pay them they outstanding balance, and they will give you the title right away. Check the seller’s driver’s license and match it with the title to make sure that the seller is really the owner of the car. If the car has any wheel locks, make sure to collect the key for them. Otherwise, you can’t the change tires. Remember to collect all the keys, maintenance records, owner’s manuals, and any spare parts the seller may have. If the seller has receipts for batteries or alternators, make sure to collect them as well. Also, buy a pair of good quality jumper cables as soon as possible, just in case the battery dies.

    What to Know Before Selecting and Buying a Used Car #rogers #auto #group


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    What to Know Before Selecting and Buying a Used Car

    March 19, 2014

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    When buying a used car, sometimes there are issues with the car that are not able to be seen upon first inspection. The buyer needs to ask the seller if the car has a clean or clear title. A clean title means that there are no major physical issues with the car. Sometimes, the term clear title is also used, but it is most often used to refer to the fact that there is not a financial lien against the car being sold.

    It is fairly easy, and very important, to check a car’s title before buying it, to make sure that it is clean and to verify details about the car. This is especially important for older model cars that may have had more than one owner. The most recent owner may not have been fully informed before buying the car himself. Most used cars that are being sold by individuals will not come with a warranty.

    Clean Title and Clear Title

    A clean title is usually used to refer to any car that passes inspection without having any serious physical issues. This ensures a higher quality car, when all the other features are also taken into consideration. A clear title is usually used to describe a financial lien that has been placed on a car. Some people use the terms interchangeably, so be sure to check which definition is meant by the seller. If a lien has been placed on a car, it would mean that any additional cost would be included in the price of the car. Optimally, a car should have both a clear and a clean title.

    Using CARFAX to Research a Car

    By using the service CARFAX, it helps someone who is shopping for a car to know almost everything about that car. Simply enter the VIN for the car, and the system will find all the recorded information about the car. The CARFAX report tells how many owners a car has had, and it shows the mileage that has been recorded when the car has been sold. It also shares any problems with the car, such as if it has been in an accident or flood, or if the car has been driven above or below the average mileage for a car of the same age. The report makes it easy to see the history of the car at a glance and if the value of the car lines up with what the seller is asking for the car.

    Using the Kelley Blue Book to Confirm the Value of a Car

    Another important aspect to consider when buying a car, in addition to a clean title, would be making sure that the asking price of a car matches up, within reason, to the value of the car. One useful tool for determining that is the Kelley Blue Book. The condition of the car, mileage, and other factors will determine the price of the car. As long as the car has a clean title, and the Blue Book value is fair, then it will help to negotiate the price.

    Reasons a Car Would Not Have a Clean Title

    There are multiple reasons why a car would not have a clean title. Many of these are things that are not immediately visible to a casual inspection. In addition to having a trusted mechanic inspect any car that is being considered for purchase, it is important to verify that the car has a clean title. A CARFAX report will list all recorded physical damage to the car.

    Not having a clean title does not make a sale impossible. As long as the buyer is aware of the issues, and the price is fair, the sale can be finalized. Many people buy cars without a clean title for the specific purpose of rebuilding cars or for parts. Even after it is rebuilt, it will retain a non-clean title, but it can be resold at a higher price later.

    Rebuilt or Reconstructed

    If a car has been rebuilt or reconstructed, that means it will have had a salvage title. While this may still be a good car to buy, it is not a clean title. Depending on the work done, and the price being asked, a rebuilt car is often in better shape than a car of the same year that has not had work done. The value of a rebuild can be higher, if better parts or better quality paint were used in the work.

    Salvage or Junk

    A salvage, or junk title, is assigned to a car that has been in an accident and is cost prohibitive to being fixed. It is often referred to as totaled, even though the car is sometimes still drivable. If the car requires repairs that cost more than three-fourths of the car’s original value, it qualifies for the salvage title. Any car that has a salvage or junk title does not qualify for a clean title.

    Hail Damage

    Hail damage is another issue that can prevent a car from having a clean title. Hail damage could be repaired cosmetically, by taking out the dents and repainting it, and might not be noticeable. However, the metal would be weakened and prone to being damaged easily again. There is no engine damage, normally, when a car has sustained hail damage.

    Flood Damage

    A car that has been damaged by flood water also will not have a clean title. This damage is a little harder to notice; however, it is probably one of the more problematic. It may not make visible damage to the car if cleaned up before it starts to rust. The engine would take a lot of work to repair and would be costly. It can also cause mold issues behind the dashboard and problems with the electrical systems. If an older car has new upholstery in the interior, it may be an indication that it was in a flood. Flood damage is more prevalent in coastal areas, as well as along rivers. It is a good idea to check the location that is listed on the title to see if it originates from an area that is prone to flooding.

    Fire Damage

    Fire damage to a car can also be fixed, but there may be some damage that is not noticed in the wiring system. It could cause serious problems in the future. The damage to the car itself is obvious; paint will not stick to the metal once it has been burned, so parts will have to be replaced. If there was fire damage, similar to flood damage, new upholstery would be an indication that there was damaged interior that had to be replaced.

    Not Accurate Mileage

    The mileage of a car is one of the factors that will determine the value of the car. It is important that the mileage be accurate so that the buyer gets a fair price. It is illegal to physically change the mileage of a car. One instance where the mileage can change on a car would be if the instrument cluster was changed. In order to still get a clean title, it must be noted in the title that it has been changed.

    How to Buy a Car on eBay Motors With a Clean Title

    When searching for a car on eBay Motors. it is good to add the word “clean title ” to the search. If the seller has certified the car as having a clean title, it will show up in the search and help narrow down the search. There are different makes and models of cars and trucks available, so it is also helpful to add a year or other feature to help find the best car for your needs.

    Getting to Know the Seller

    When investing in a car, it is important to know the reputation of the seller. Top-rated Sellers on eBay Motors help ensure a better transaction. Reading the feedback that has been left by other buyers also helps to make a good choice. There may not be much feedback, unless the seller is a dealer, so what feedback is there is even more important to read over carefully.

    Conclusion

    When buying cars, knowing the value of the car is only one part of purchasing the car. It is also important to check for a clean title. By knowing that a car has a clean title, there are fewer potential problems in the future. Many of the problems that cause issues, that would make a clean title impossible, are often hard to see on first inspection of the car. Using the CARFAX report will confirm that the listing of a car with a clean title does indeed have a clean title.

    Some people want to buy a car without a clean title for parts or to rebuild for recreational purposes, like drag racing, so knowing that the title is not clean may allow the buyer to negotiate the price. The Kelley Blue Book listing will allow the negotiations to go easier.

    6 Things Every Sucker Should Know Before Buying a Used Car #used #car #dealer


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    6 Things Every Sucker Should Know Before Buying a Used Car

    By: Robert Brockway

    | October 25, 2012

    1,274,221 views 866

    Buying a used car is like going to a dentist who wants to knock out your old teeth and sell you new ones. Everybody involved in the process is assuredly biased, possibly psychotic, and actively wants to do you bodily harm. More sad, dissatisfied people have left car dealerships than strip clubs, and it’s no wonder: Cars are extremely complicated, terribly expensive, and for some reason every one is guarded by a small gang of pathological liars. It’s one of the worst experiences of your life, and you need somebody trustworthy to help you. Unfortunately, you’ve got me. Lucky for you, I have bought and destroyed more cars than is technically allowable by the United States government, and am therefore legally obligated to actually try to help you in this column, which I do as a “service” to the “community.” I think we can get through this, if you take my advice to heart.*

    *Well, except for all the times I tell you to “flip the table on them bitches.” That’s just some good general advice I try to work in everywhere, and may not be applicable to the situation at hand.

    #6. Do Your Research

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    Never, ever walk into a dealership “just to see what they’ve got.” Salesmen see that aimless stare on your face and they’re like starving cartoon wolves — they don’t even see a person; all they see is a giant walking turkey leg. Most small and midsize dealerships will have online inventories. Check those out in advance and start looking up the models you’re interested in, then read up on each one: Comb through car sites like Edmunds, click on forum posts by owners, get the specs and find out about users’ experience with reliability — hell, go to Wikipedia and bone up on the entire history of the model and the powertrain you’re considering. Back in school, you’d do the same amount of research for a book report on Huck Finn just because an older lady in a paneled skirt threatened you with the alphabet — you can do the same legwork for a multi-thousand-dollar purchase you’re going to entrust your life to every time you leave the house to get a burrito. Whatever you do, the point is to come in with a mental list: Do not let them steer you outside of that list to a car that you’re not familiar with. Adventure is wondrous and grand, but the used car lot is not the place to listen to strange old men in tattered clothes whisper of magical chariots.

    “It’s dangerous to go alone. Take this Daihatsu!”

    Now this is the important part, so pay attention: No matter what anybody tells you — no matter how respectable the source — never, ever, ever buy the Kia. Regardless of dealership affiliation, every used car lot on the planet has a dull red Kia out back that they want to show you. It’s going to feel wrong, somehow, like the air around it has gone stale. That’s the universe trying to warn you. There will be rational arguments, and your brain is gonna be all like, “Hey, it sounds like they’ve gotten a lot better lately,” and, “Look, even the car magazines think they’ve got some decent models.” But there’s a very simple explanation for this illusion: It’s a vast government conspiracy and everybody is in on it but me. They are terrible cars that will explode and betray you, no matter how meticulously you care for them. Isn’t that right, Optima, you fickle bitch?! You broke my heart! And for what? A measly 15,000 miles? I thought we had something! I spent two years inside of you. Does that mean nothing?!

    #5. Dealing With the Dealer

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    You need to treat the first few moments at a dealership like an old-timey mobster being interrogated by the coppers: You don’t say nothin’ about nothin’. Financing? What’s that? Trade-ins? Ha, what a hilarious portmanteau of gibberish! Price range? I don’t even speak English.

    The first step is just and only to find the car you want, go over it carefully, take stock of any work that needs doing, and barter out the final price. Only when that’s all settled do you talk about trading in something. Why would you discuss trade-ins right up front if you haven’t even found a car you like? You’re not even sure you’re shopping there yet. The grocery store doesn’t pull you aside when you walk in the doors and ask how much you’re planning to spend today. So why do dealerships always want to know your price, payment and trades first? Because it gives them leverage against you: “Oh, well, if we’re going to do you a favor and take this trade-in off your hands, you have to buy one of these pre-selected vehicles.” Or, “Oh, you’re financing? Those aren’t our finance cars. Our finance cars are all dull red Kias; let’s go out back and take a look.”

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    “Ignore the disembodied voices telling you to flee. That’s a. feature. Ghost-voicing. Costs extra.”

    That’s bullshit. Everything is a finance car. Just like everything is a cash car. The car does not care how you pay for it. It is a car. Even if it becomes sentient, it’s mostly only going to care about fighting crime and ramping shit, like K.I.T.T. from Knight Rider. And brother, if that happens: You let it. You buy yourself a leather jacket and a perm and get the fuck out of there; your car search is over.

    #4. Vehicle Inspection

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    There are a few basic things you can check, even if you know nothing about cars. First thing you want to do is get right up close against the side of the front fender. (This should also serve to draw out any potential sentient-car crime-fighting partners, as they cannot resist wisecracking and will likely say something cute like, “Geez, buy me dinner first.” If so, then you’re done: It’s all cowhide coverings and curly hair for the rest of your days.) If there’s little to no rapport between you and the vehicle at this point, just sight down the trim lines to make sure they’re straight with no fluctuations — offset doors, fenders, and uneven lines could indicate frame damage. Look around the engine bay at the spots where the metal struts come together — the joints should be straight, with no signs of recent welding. Take a look underneath the car and watch for rust on the rails, in the wheel wells, or basically anywhere else. Be afraid of rust. Rust is the mind-killer. You’ll think you can take rust — it’s just some pansy little oxidation, right? But you can’t. Rust is better than you. Rust will laugh at your feeble angle grinders; it will spit at your steel wool and mock your puny acids. Rust will shrug off all your mightiest efforts and then, when you are broken, it will take your woman in a way that you never could.

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    “F. from behind? I don’t know, man; I’m just a chemical process.”

    Also remember to CHECK. THE. FUCKING. FLUIDS. Don’t just stare at the engine with your dick in your hand, wondering if you could stop the flywheel with your cock (no matter how awesome it would be to seize a V8 with nothing but your willpower and steely erection, this is not the time for it). Pull those dipsticks out and check the reservoirs. Brake fluid is, in an ideal world, clear to slightly yellowish. But the world we live in is broken and flawed, so it’s usually tea-colored. If it looks like strong coffee, you’re going to need to bleed the brake system, at the very least. That’s a few hundred dollars right there. It doesn’t require a lot of know-how or expensive parts, so you’re going to want to do it yourself.

    Do not.

    Bleeding brakes is exactly as traumatic as bleeding your only child, only it takes like, four times as long (depending on size and age of child). Check the oil: If it looks like a Wendy’s chocolate Frosty, just turn around and run. Run as fast as you can. Hop into your car and tear ass out of that dealership like The Dukes of Hazzard. That means a blown head-gasket, and it is death. If somebody assures you, “It’ll still run,” you can respond, “So will a man with no legs, if you shoot at him enough; that doesn’t mean he’ll get far.” (The casual murder references let ’em know you mean business.)

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    “Hi, Bob. Nice to meet you. I’ve killed four men. Every one of them stole from me.”

    Make sure the coolant is clear, the transmission fluid is red or purplish (just not black or oily) and all the belts and hoses are free of cracks. Finally, if it’s a new car or a big expense, you buy yourself a copy of a program like Torque, then go on eBay and get an ODBII scanner. Plug that into the car (the ODB slot is usually beneath the dash on the driver’s side) and you can see literally everything about its engine in real time, right there on your smartphone. Do me a favor and look at the salesman’s face when you do it: See that expression? That’s what hope looks like, as it leaves the world. He’s just realized he’s not going to win this one, because you’re from the future — you’ve already done this deal.

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    My client. * The family of Albert EINSTEIN
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    * Margaux HEMINGWAY * Anne Ascher Beverly Hills (interior decorator for the WHITE HOUSE) * Private residence in Greenwich, CN owner of Empire State Building * Taylor Mead son of Andy WARHOL * G.H. Chakkour (Museum of Modern Art) * BANK of France –Credit Agricole * QUEEN Victoria’s daughter s lute repair * Philanthropists Mr. Carter Burden, the * Earle Vandekar family * Mr. Geller * Elia KAZAN Oscar * Jerome HELMET Oscar winning *Canadian and Swedish consulates, NYC * Charles Gibson (Channel 7 News) * Tom Britt Interior designers

    *Antiques – Restoration Department.1089 Madison AvenueNew York, NY 10028
    *Art Antique Restore. 4500 N Flagler Dr, West Palm Beach, FL

    *Greenwich Oriental Art, 7 East Putnam Avenue, Greenwich, CT *Ann Ascher Interiors Inc Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, CA * Guild Antiques Restoration Department 1095 Madison Ave, New York, NY *Eagle Antiques 1097 Madison Ave New York, NY 10028

    Calculate Your Car Loan Payments Before You Decide on a Car #murrays #auto


    #payment calculator auto
    #

    Calculate Your Car Loan Payments Before You Decide on a Car

    If you’re in the market for a new car (or even a used car that you can’t afford to buy with cash), you’re probably also in the market for a car loan. While car loans are usually much smaller than mortgages and home equity loans, the auto loan payments can still take a decent-sized bite out of your monthly household budget.

    You therefore need to do your research in order to find the most affordable car loan with the most desirable payment terms. As part of that research, you’ll want to estimate what your monthly payments will be for various loan amounts at different interest rates.

    Regardless of where the financing for your automobile purchase ultimately comes from, your credit scores will factor heavily into the interest rate you pay on your car loan. Much like mortgage brokers, car dealers need to ensure that loan applicants are ready, willing, and able to pay off a line of credit, so if you want to get financing through a car dealer, their loan department is going to run a credit check on you. That means checking out your credit reports and scores from at least one of the three major credit bureaus.

    Car dealers find themselves in an interesting spot these days. They need to sell cars to stay in business, but their customers typically require loans to afford car purchases, and the consumer credit industry is still much tighter than it was before the Great Recession occurred.

    Because of this dynamic, car dealers may be more willing to provide financing to consumers with poor credit scores than banks might be, but the basic lenders’ rule-of-thumb still applies: The lower your credit score is, the higher your interest rate will be and the bigger your monthly auto loan payments will be.

    (Keep in mind that there’s another dynamic at play when you take out a loan of any kind. Your record of making, missing, or remitting late payments on that loan will appear on your credit report and factor into your credit score. Missed or delinquent auto loan payments can quickly drag down your credit score, which can affect your ability to renegotiate your car loan or acquire another line of credit.)

    There are, of course, factors beyond your credit scores that help determine the ultimate amount of your monthly auto loan payments, including:

    • Dealer or manufacturer rebates. Rebates are usually offered at the end of a model year, when car dealers and carmakers try to reduce their inventory of unsold cars.
  • Trade-in allowances. Car dealers generally put a cap on how much they’re willing to reduce the selling price of a car when you trade in your current vehicle.
  • Your outstanding trade-in balance. If you’re trading in a car to the dealership where you originally bought it, and you still owe money on that car, the dealer will factor that amount into your loan application.
  • The size of your down payment. Obviously, the more money you put down upfront, the less you’ll need to borrow. Smaller car loans often mean better loan terms, because the lender’s risk is reduced.
  • Gap insurance. Gap insurance is typically required when a buyer offers little or nothing in the way of a down payment, especially if the buyer has poor credit. This insurance also protects the buyer, though; if your newly-bought car is totaled due to an accident, flood, or other calamity, you won’t be on the hook for the outstanding auto loan payments. If you finance through a dealership, any required gap insurance premiums are typically included in your monthly payments.
  • The loan term. Auto loans typically require full repayment within three to five years.
  • Your interest rate. As noted earlier, your credit scores will be used to determine the general range of your interest rate, but the factors listed above will also play a role.
  • Regardless of where you finance your car purchase, negotiating a car loan and determining your auto loan payments can be a complicated undertaking. Before you choose your next car, much less apply for a car loan, you should make every effort to estimate your auto payments as accurately as possible to help you determine how much you can afford to spend on your car purchase.

    FreeScore ‘s Auto Loan Calculator below can help you estimate your monthly auto loan payments. Through the calculator, you can enter any and all of the applicable information listed above to figure out how much you’ll end up paying for a car loan, including the total amount of interest you’ll pay over the life of the loan.

    Title Check – Look before you buy #free #auto #insurance #quotes


    #auto vin check
    #

    Title Check – Look before you buy

    Welcome to Title Check!

    Here you can select an approved provider to check the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) of the vehicle you want to purchase to find out if it is salvaged, rebuilt, or was damaged in a flood. This is one of the most important steps you can take to protect yourself before making your purchase.

    Here’s what you do to complete a Title Check:

    1. Get the VIN of the vehicle you want to buy.
    2. Have your credit card available.
    3. Select one of the approved providers below. Prices begin at only a couple dollars so you may want to shop the vendors before making a selection. Be sure to note what is offered for the price.
    4. Follow the steps to obtain the report.

    The VIN is run through the National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS), a national consumer protection database that provides title information from states across the country. Whether you are buying from a local dealer, individual or eyeing a vehicle from an online auction website, it will help you to know what you are buying before you pay any money or sign any paperwork for the vehicle.

    A report from the NMVTIS database gives you the vehicle’s title history, which includes whether the vehicle was ever in the possession of a junk or salvage yard or declared a “total loss” by an insurance company.

    Protect your title, Texas.

      For Consumers

    Calculate Your Car Loan Payments Before You Decide on a Car #auto #direct


    #payment calculator auto
    #

    Calculate Your Car Loan Payments Before You Decide on a Car

    If you’re in the market for a new car (or even a used car that you can’t afford to buy with cash), you’re probably also in the market for a car loan. While car loans are usually much smaller than mortgages and home equity loans, the auto loan payments can still take a decent-sized bite out of your monthly household budget.

    You therefore need to do your research in order to find the most affordable car loan with the most desirable payment terms. As part of that research, you’ll want to estimate what your monthly payments will be for various loan amounts at different interest rates.

    Regardless of where the financing for your automobile purchase ultimately comes from, your credit scores will factor heavily into the interest rate you pay on your car loan. Much like mortgage brokers, car dealers need to ensure that loan applicants are ready, willing, and able to pay off a line of credit, so if you want to get financing through a car dealer, their loan department is going to run a credit check on you. That means checking out your credit reports and scores from at least one of the three major credit bureaus.

    Car dealers find themselves in an interesting spot these days. They need to sell cars to stay in business, but their customers typically require loans to afford car purchases, and the consumer credit industry is still much tighter than it was before the Great Recession occurred.

    Because of this dynamic, car dealers may be more willing to provide financing to consumers with poor credit scores than banks might be, but the basic lenders’ rule-of-thumb still applies: The lower your credit score is, the higher your interest rate will be and the bigger your monthly auto loan payments will be.

    (Keep in mind that there’s another dynamic at play when you take out a loan of any kind. Your record of making, missing, or remitting late payments on that loan will appear on your credit report and factor into your credit score. Missed or delinquent auto loan payments can quickly drag down your credit score, which can affect your ability to renegotiate your car loan or acquire another line of credit.)

    There are, of course, factors beyond your credit scores that help determine the ultimate amount of your monthly auto loan payments, including:

    • Dealer or manufacturer rebates. Rebates are usually offered at the end of a model year, when car dealers and carmakers try to reduce their inventory of unsold cars.
  • Trade-in allowances. Car dealers generally put a cap on how much they’re willing to reduce the selling price of a car when you trade in your current vehicle.
  • Your outstanding trade-in balance. If you’re trading in a car to the dealership where you originally bought it, and you still owe money on that car, the dealer will factor that amount into your loan application.
  • The size of your down payment. Obviously, the more money you put down upfront, the less you’ll need to borrow. Smaller car loans often mean better loan terms, because the lender’s risk is reduced.
  • Gap insurance. Gap insurance is typically required when a buyer offers little or nothing in the way of a down payment, especially if the buyer has poor credit. This insurance also protects the buyer, though; if your newly-bought car is totaled due to an accident, flood, or other calamity, you won’t be on the hook for the outstanding auto loan payments. If you finance through a dealership, any required gap insurance premiums are typically included in your monthly payments.
  • The loan term. Auto loans typically require full repayment within three to five years.
  • Your interest rate. As noted earlier, your credit scores will be used to determine the general range of your interest rate, but the factors listed above will also play a role.
  • Regardless of where you finance your car purchase, negotiating a car loan and determining your auto loan payments can be a complicated undertaking. Before you choose your next car, much less apply for a car loan, you should make every effort to estimate your auto payments as accurately as possible to help you determine how much you can afford to spend on your car purchase.

    FreeScore ‘s Auto Loan Calculator below can help you estimate your monthly auto loan payments. Through the calculator, you can enter any and all of the applicable information listed above to figure out how much you’ll end up paying for a car loan, including the total amount of interest you’ll pay over the life of the loan.

    6 Things Every Sucker Should Know Before Buying a Used Car #used #auto #loan #rates


    #buying a used car
    #

    6 Things Every Sucker Should Know Before Buying a Used Car

    By: Robert Brockway

    | October 25, 2012

    1,274,221 views 866

    Buying a used car is like going to a dentist who wants to knock out your old teeth and sell you new ones. Everybody involved in the process is assuredly biased, possibly psychotic, and actively wants to do you bodily harm. More sad, dissatisfied people have left car dealerships than strip clubs, and it’s no wonder: Cars are extremely complicated, terribly expensive, and for some reason every one is guarded by a small gang of pathological liars. It’s one of the worst experiences of your life, and you need somebody trustworthy to help you. Unfortunately, you’ve got me. Lucky for you, I have bought and destroyed more cars than is technically allowable by the United States government, and am therefore legally obligated to actually try to help you in this column, which I do as a “service” to the “community.” I think we can get through this, if you take my advice to heart.*

    *Well, except for all the times I tell you to “flip the table on them bitches.” That’s just some good general advice I try to work in everywhere, and may not be applicable to the situation at hand.

    #6. Do Your Research

    Getty

    Never, ever walk into a dealership “just to see what they’ve got.” Salesmen see that aimless stare on your face and they’re like starving cartoon wolves — they don’t even see a person; all they see is a giant walking turkey leg. Most small and midsize dealerships will have online inventories. Check those out in advance and start looking up the models you’re interested in, then read up on each one: Comb through car sites like Edmunds, click on forum posts by owners, get the specs and find out about users’ experience with reliability — hell, go to Wikipedia and bone up on the entire history of the model and the powertrain you’re considering. Back in school, you’d do the same amount of research for a book report on Huck Finn just because an older lady in a paneled skirt threatened you with the alphabet — you can do the same legwork for a multi-thousand-dollar purchase you’re going to entrust your life to every time you leave the house to get a burrito. Whatever you do, the point is to come in with a mental list: Do not let them steer you outside of that list to a car that you’re not familiar with. Adventure is wondrous and grand, but the used car lot is not the place to listen to strange old men in tattered clothes whisper of magical chariots.

    “It’s dangerous to go alone. Take this Daihatsu!”

    Now this is the important part, so pay attention: No matter what anybody tells you — no matter how respectable the source — never, ever, ever buy the Kia. Regardless of dealership affiliation, every used car lot on the planet has a dull red Kia out back that they want to show you. It’s going to feel wrong, somehow, like the air around it has gone stale. That’s the universe trying to warn you. There will be rational arguments, and your brain is gonna be all like, “Hey, it sounds like they’ve gotten a lot better lately,” and, “Look, even the car magazines think they’ve got some decent models.” But there’s a very simple explanation for this illusion: It’s a vast government conspiracy and everybody is in on it but me. They are terrible cars that will explode and betray you, no matter how meticulously you care for them. Isn’t that right, Optima, you fickle bitch?! You broke my heart! And for what? A measly 15,000 miles? I thought we had something! I spent two years inside of you. Does that mean nothing?!

    #5. Dealing With the Dealer

    Getty

    You need to treat the first few moments at a dealership like an old-timey mobster being interrogated by the coppers: You don’t say nothin’ about nothin’. Financing? What’s that? Trade-ins? Ha, what a hilarious portmanteau of gibberish! Price range? I don’t even speak English.

    The first step is just and only to find the car you want, go over it carefully, take stock of any work that needs doing, and barter out the final price. Only when that’s all settled do you talk about trading in something. Why would you discuss trade-ins right up front if you haven’t even found a car you like? You’re not even sure you’re shopping there yet. The grocery store doesn’t pull you aside when you walk in the doors and ask how much you’re planning to spend today. So why do dealerships always want to know your price, payment and trades first? Because it gives them leverage against you: “Oh, well, if we’re going to do you a favor and take this trade-in off your hands, you have to buy one of these pre-selected vehicles.” Or, “Oh, you’re financing? Those aren’t our finance cars. Our finance cars are all dull red Kias; let’s go out back and take a look.”

    Getty

    “Ignore the disembodied voices telling you to flee. That’s a. feature. Ghost-voicing. Costs extra.”

    That’s bullshit. Everything is a finance car. Just like everything is a cash car. The car does not care how you pay for it. It is a car. Even if it becomes sentient, it’s mostly only going to care about fighting crime and ramping shit, like K.I.T.T. from Knight Rider. And brother, if that happens: You let it. You buy yourself a leather jacket and a perm and get the fuck out of there; your car search is over.

    #4. Vehicle Inspection

    Getty

    There are a few basic things you can check, even if you know nothing about cars. First thing you want to do is get right up close against the side of the front fender. (This should also serve to draw out any potential sentient-car crime-fighting partners, as they cannot resist wisecracking and will likely say something cute like, “Geez, buy me dinner first.” If so, then you’re done: It’s all cowhide coverings and curly hair for the rest of your days.) If there’s little to no rapport between you and the vehicle at this point, just sight down the trim lines to make sure they’re straight with no fluctuations — offset doors, fenders, and uneven lines could indicate frame damage. Look around the engine bay at the spots where the metal struts come together — the joints should be straight, with no signs of recent welding. Take a look underneath the car and watch for rust on the rails, in the wheel wells, or basically anywhere else. Be afraid of rust. Rust is the mind-killer. You’ll think you can take rust — it’s just some pansy little oxidation, right? But you can’t. Rust is better than you. Rust will laugh at your feeble angle grinders; it will spit at your steel wool and mock your puny acids. Rust will shrug off all your mightiest efforts and then, when you are broken, it will take your woman in a way that you never could.

    Getty

    “F. from behind? I don’t know, man; I’m just a chemical process.”

    Also remember to CHECK. THE. FUCKING. FLUIDS. Don’t just stare at the engine with your dick in your hand, wondering if you could stop the flywheel with your cock (no matter how awesome it would be to seize a V8 with nothing but your willpower and steely erection, this is not the time for it). Pull those dipsticks out and check the reservoirs. Brake fluid is, in an ideal world, clear to slightly yellowish. But the world we live in is broken and flawed, so it’s usually tea-colored. If it looks like strong coffee, you’re going to need to bleed the brake system, at the very least. That’s a few hundred dollars right there. It doesn’t require a lot of know-how or expensive parts, so you’re going to want to do it yourself.

    Do not.

    Bleeding brakes is exactly as traumatic as bleeding your only child, only it takes like, four times as long (depending on size and age of child). Check the oil: If it looks like a Wendy’s chocolate Frosty, just turn around and run. Run as fast as you can. Hop into your car and tear ass out of that dealership like The Dukes of Hazzard. That means a blown head-gasket, and it is death. If somebody assures you, “It’ll still run,” you can respond, “So will a man with no legs, if you shoot at him enough; that doesn’t mean he’ll get far.” (The casual murder references let ’em know you mean business.)

    Getty

    “Hi, Bob. Nice to meet you. I’ve killed four men. Every one of them stole from me.”

    Make sure the coolant is clear, the transmission fluid is red or purplish (just not black or oily) and all the belts and hoses are free of cracks. Finally, if it’s a new car or a big expense, you buy yourself a copy of a program like Torque, then go on eBay and get an ODBII scanner. Plug that into the car (the ODB slot is usually beneath the dash on the driver’s side) and you can see literally everything about its engine in real time, right there on your smartphone. Do me a favor and look at the salesman’s face when you do it: See that expression? That’s what hope looks like, as it leaves the world. He’s just realized he’s not going to win this one, because you’re from the future — you’ve already done this deal.

    Title Check – Look before you buy #auto #air #conditioning


    #auto vin check
    #

    Title Check – Look before you buy

    Welcome to Title Check!

    Here you can select an approved provider to check the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) of the vehicle you want to purchase to find out if it is salvaged, rebuilt, or was damaged in a flood. This is one of the most important steps you can take to protect yourself before making your purchase.

    Here’s what you do to complete a Title Check:

    1. Get the VIN of the vehicle you want to buy.
    2. Have your credit card available.
    3. Select one of the approved providers below. Prices begin at only a couple dollars so you may want to shop the vendors before making a selection. Be sure to note what is offered for the price.
    4. Follow the steps to obtain the report.

    The VIN is run through the National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS), a national consumer protection database that provides title information from states across the country. Whether you are buying from a local dealer, individual or eyeing a vehicle from an online auction website, it will help you to know what you are buying before you pay any money or sign any paperwork for the vehicle.

    A report from the NMVTIS database gives you the vehicle’s title history, which includes whether the vehicle was ever in the possession of a junk or salvage yard or declared a “total loss” by an insurance company.

    Protect your title, Texas.

      For Consumers

    Buying a Car: What to Know Before You Go – Feature – Car and Driver #trak #auto


    #buying a new car
    #

    Car-buying tips to follow before you ever set foot in a car dealership.

    Feature

    Now is a good time to buy a new car. The struggles facing the auto industry are unprecedented and so are the deals available to buyers. Car dealers need to sell cars in order to stay in business, which makes this a strong buyers market. Rebates, financing, and trade-in values are the best they ve been in a long time.

    But that doesn t mean it s an easy time to buy a car, and it doesn t mean dealers are going to lie down and give the cars away. A savvy buyer must always be ready, and the preparation should start before you ever set foot in a showroom.

    Know the Invoice Price

    Once you ve settled on what car is right for you. look up the invoice price for that car in our Buyer s Guide. Invoice price is what the dealer pays the manufacturer for the car; the manufacturer s suggested retail price (MSRP, or sticker price ) includes hundreds usually thousands of dollars of profit for the dealer. With the exception of all-new or very popular models, you should be able to get a new car for closer to invoice than MSRP. Knowing the invoice price of your car will tell the dealer that you mean business and expect a good deal. Don t walk into the dealership without this information.

    Check the Manufacturer s Website for Rebates

    Many buyers will qualify for multiple rebates, some of which may not even be made public. You might belong to organizations or receive coupons in the mail that entitle you to additional rebates. Be aware of all rebates for which you qualify and make sure you receive them. Dealers are known for not giving buyers every rebate available to them, instead keeping one or two as additional profit.

    Research the Dealers

    Buying from a cooperative and fair dealer will save you money and headaches. There are a number of websites that allow people to post reviews of dealerships, but their coverage is spotty and incomplete. If you can t find online reviews of the dealer you are considering, just talk to people. Your friends and neighbors purchase cars and should be honest with you about whether they were happy with their car or dealer.

    Check Your Credit History

    Most people who shop for cars will need a loan. How much that loan costs will depend on your credit history, and knowing your credit history will give you a better idea what to expect from lenders. The Fair and Accurate Credit Transaction Act of 2003 (FACTA) allows every consumer to get a free copy of his or her credit report once a year from each of the three major credit-reporting agencies (TransUnion, Experian, and Equifax). Get a copy of your credit report, and check it for accuracy. Pay the extra few dollars to get your credit score as well, as it is one of the major factors that banks use to determine your creditworthiness.

    Get Your Own Financing

    The biggest profit center for a car dealership is its finance department. Dealers contract with banks to get the best rates available but might not actually give you those rates. They might get you a car loan for 4.9 percent APR but draw up your finance contract at 5.9 percent. That one-percent markup is strictly profit for the dealer. You can often get a better interest rate from your local bank or credit union, or you can present the rates you were offered elsewhere to your salesman and challenge him to match or beat them. That being said, promotional rates from manufacturers sometimes as low as zero percent can be tough to beat.

    Time Your Purchase

    Dealers run on a month-to-month basis. At the end of the month, many will accept lower offers to reach their goals and qualify for manufacturer bonuses. If you re not picky about having the latest and greatest, the end of a model year is a great time to get good deals on remaining inventory. And December particularly the last week before the new year is a slow time for car sales, so if you can hack some time out of your holiday-shopping schedule, it s a wise time to buy.

    Also, most dealerships are busier on weekends. The weekdays are generally slow, especially in the morning. If you come into the dealership on a midweek morning when business is slow, the salespeople are more likely to make a good deal as well. They need sales and they want to look busy, which keeps them motivated to give you a better deal and earn your business.

    Do Not Buy a Car on Your First Visit

    Use the first visit to look at and test-drive the car(s) you are interested in. Gather your information and then leave, and be adamant that you will not be buying a car today. This will communicate to the dealer that you are not going to be bullied. Watch what you say to the salespeople especially if they ask you how much you are prepared to pay monthly because whatever you say will be used as a starting point from which the dealer will go up when negotiations eventually start.

    Get Internet Quotes from Several Dealers

    CARandDRIVER.com offers free online pricing quotes from your local dealers. Get quotes from multiple dealers before you ever visit any of them. If dealers know they are being pitted against other stores, it will be easier for you to get their best offer right off the bat, and waltzing into a dealership with a first offer already in hand gives you an advantage in negotiations.

    Make an Appointment with the Sales Manager

    Once your research is done and you are ready to head to the dealership to purchase a new car, call ahead and make an appointment. By calling a sales manager to make your appointment, you communicate that you are serious about this transaction and know what you are doing. You will still be paired with a salesman when you arrive, but your chances improve of getting a straight shooter who knows you won t be easy fodder.

    There is no guarantee you will get a good deal on a new-car purchase, nor is there a set price to negotiate toward with any car; pricing always varies with content, age, supply, and demand. But following these rules will start you in the right direction to get the best deal possible on your new car.

    Brian Munroe is the author of Car Buying Revealed. You can find out about Munroe and his book at his website, www.CarBuyingRevealed.com.

    What to Know Before Selecting and Buying a Used Car #auto #warranties


    #buying used car
    #

    What to Know Before Selecting and Buying a Used Car

    March 19, 2014

    %img src=”http://i.ebayimg.com/00/$T2eC16hHJGMFFo!(TFPyBRqybUNyCg%3C/p%3E%0D%0A%3Cp%3E_35.JPG” /%

    When buying a used car, sometimes there are issues with the car that are not able to be seen upon first inspection. The buyer needs to ask the seller if the car has a clean or clear title. A clean title means that there are no major physical issues with the car. Sometimes, the term clear title is also used, but it is most often used to refer to the fact that there is not a financial lien against the car being sold.

    It is fairly easy, and very important, to check a car’s title before buying it, to make sure that it is clean and to verify details about the car. This is especially important for older model cars that may have had more than one owner. The most recent owner may not have been fully informed before buying the car himself. Most used cars that are being sold by individuals will not come with a warranty.

    Clean Title and Clear Title

    A clean title is usually used to refer to any car that passes inspection without having any serious physical issues. This ensures a higher quality car, when all the other features are also taken into consideration. A clear title is usually used to describe a financial lien that has been placed on a car. Some people use the terms interchangeably, so be sure to check which definition is meant by the seller. If a lien has been placed on a car, it would mean that any additional cost would be included in the price of the car. Optimally, a car should have both a clear and a clean title.

    Using CARFAX to Research a Car

    By using the service CARFAX, it helps someone who is shopping for a car to know almost everything about that car. Simply enter the VIN for the car, and the system will find all the recorded information about the car. The CARFAX report tells how many owners a car has had, and it shows the mileage that has been recorded when the car has been sold. It also shares any problems with the car, such as if it has been in an accident or flood, or if the car has been driven above or below the average mileage for a car of the same age. The report makes it easy to see the history of the car at a glance and if the value of the car lines up with what the seller is asking for the car.

    Using the Kelley Blue Book to Confirm the Value of a Car

    Another important aspect to consider when buying a car, in addition to a clean title, would be making sure that the asking price of a car matches up, within reason, to the value of the car. One useful tool for determining that is the Kelley Blue Book. The condition of the car, mileage, and other factors will determine the price of the car. As long as the car has a clean title, and the Blue Book value is fair, then it will help to negotiate the price.

    Reasons a Car Would Not Have a Clean Title

    There are multiple reasons why a car would not have a clean title. Many of these are things that are not immediately visible to a casual inspection. In addition to having a trusted mechanic inspect any car that is being considered for purchase, it is important to verify that the car has a clean title. A CARFAX report will list all recorded physical damage to the car.

    Not having a clean title does not make a sale impossible. As long as the buyer is aware of the issues, and the price is fair, the sale can be finalized. Many people buy cars without a clean title for the specific purpose of rebuilding cars or for parts. Even after it is rebuilt, it will retain a non-clean title, but it can be resold at a higher price later.

    Rebuilt or Reconstructed

    If a car has been rebuilt or reconstructed, that means it will have had a salvage title. While this may still be a good car to buy, it is not a clean title. Depending on the work done, and the price being asked, a rebuilt car is often in better shape than a car of the same year that has not had work done. The value of a rebuild can be higher, if better parts or better quality paint were used in the work.

    Salvage or Junk

    A salvage, or junk title, is assigned to a car that has been in an accident and is cost prohibitive to being fixed. It is often referred to as totaled, even though the car is sometimes still drivable. If the car requires repairs that cost more than three-fourths of the car’s original value, it qualifies for the salvage title. Any car that has a salvage or junk title does not qualify for a clean title.

    Hail Damage

    Hail damage is another issue that can prevent a car from having a clean title. Hail damage could be repaired cosmetically, by taking out the dents and repainting it, and might not be noticeable. However, the metal would be weakened and prone to being damaged easily again. There is no engine damage, normally, when a car has sustained hail damage.

    Flood Damage

    A car that has been damaged by flood water also will not have a clean title. This damage is a little harder to notice; however, it is probably one of the more problematic. It may not make visible damage to the car if cleaned up before it starts to rust. The engine would take a lot of work to repair and would be costly. It can also cause mold issues behind the dashboard and problems with the electrical systems. If an older car has new upholstery in the interior, it may be an indication that it was in a flood. Flood damage is more prevalent in coastal areas, as well as along rivers. It is a good idea to check the location that is listed on the title to see if it originates from an area that is prone to flooding.

    Fire Damage

    Fire damage to a car can also be fixed, but there may be some damage that is not noticed in the wiring system. It could cause serious problems in the future. The damage to the car itself is obvious; paint will not stick to the metal once it has been burned, so parts will have to be replaced. If there was fire damage, similar to flood damage, new upholstery would be an indication that there was damaged interior that had to be replaced.

    Not Accurate Mileage

    The mileage of a car is one of the factors that will determine the value of the car. It is important that the mileage be accurate so that the buyer gets a fair price. It is illegal to physically change the mileage of a car. One instance where the mileage can change on a car would be if the instrument cluster was changed. In order to still get a clean title, it must be noted in the title that it has been changed.

    How to Buy a Car on eBay Motors With a Clean Title

    When searching for a car on eBay Motors. it is good to add the word “clean title ” to the search. If the seller has certified the car as having a clean title, it will show up in the search and help narrow down the search. There are different makes and models of cars and trucks available, so it is also helpful to add a year or other feature to help find the best car for your needs.

    Getting to Know the Seller

    When investing in a car, it is important to know the reputation of the seller. Top-rated Sellers on eBay Motors help ensure a better transaction. Reading the feedback that has been left by other buyers also helps to make a good choice. There may not be much feedback, unless the seller is a dealer, so what feedback is there is even more important to read over carefully.

    Conclusion

    When buying cars, knowing the value of the car is only one part of purchasing the car. It is also important to check for a clean title. By knowing that a car has a clean title, there are fewer potential problems in the future. Many of the problems that cause issues, that would make a clean title impossible, are often hard to see on first inspection of the car. Using the CARFAX report will confirm that the listing of a car with a clean title does indeed have a clean title.

    Some people want to buy a car without a clean title for parts or to rebuild for recreational purposes, like drag racing, so knowing that the title is not clean may allow the buyer to negotiate the price. The Kelley Blue Book listing will allow the negotiations to go easier.

    What to Know Before You Buy Car Insurance Online – Allstate #auction #cars


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    What to Know Before You Buy Car Insurance Online

    Buying car insurance online can be challenging. Sure, there are dozens maybe even hundreds of auto insurance providers vying for your business through interactive websites that allow you to do everything from getting a simple quote to closing the deal on coverage. But if you’ve got any questions that need answering beforehand, your best bet is to pick up the phone and talk to an agent directly .

    Of course, you may not have to do that. If your needs are simple, you may be able to seal the deal without even picking up the phone. Here are a few things to know about buying car insurance online.

    You will be asked to provide specific details about the car you’re insuring.

    It’s not enough to be able to key the make, model and year of your vehicle into an online car insurance quote form. Beyond those basics, you may be asked a number of detailed questions that will help the insurance company give you the most accurate quote. Be sure you have the following additional information handy when you buy car insurance online.

    No Credit Check Loans – Look Before you Leap #nada #auto


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    No Credit Check Loans

    By Justin Pritchard. Banking/Loans Expert

    Justin Pritchard helps consumers navigate the world of banking.

    If your credit prevents you from getting a loan, it may be possible to borrow without relying on your credit history. However, you need to be careful when using no credit check loans. These loans are expensive, and they only make sense when all other options are off the table.

    Do You Really Need One?

    If they say no, that’s fine – you can always look at other options. But you never know for sure until you ask.

    It’s important to understand that lenders aren’t in business to lose money. If anybody is willing to lend you money without checking your credit, they’re doing it for a price. Make sure you know what that price is before you apply. They’ll typically charge high interest rates along with various fees to compensate them for the risk. If you can avoid paying that price, do so.

    Continue Reading Below

    In general, it’s best to avoid no credit check loans unless you’re truly out of options. They should not be used to purchase “wants” or luxuries – they’re best for “needs.” If you need to fix your car so that you can keep getting to work (and earning an income), one of these loans might make sense. The same is true for a medical procedure that you have no other way of funding.

    Types of Loans

    No credit check loans are typically short term loans that you get relatively quickly. These generally aren’t loans that you’ll repay over several years; a few weeks or months is more common. They are very much like payday loans. which are expensive short-term loans. In fact, a lot of advertisements for no credit check loans are really just ads for payday loan programs. Lenders don’t make these lending decisions based on your credit score. Instead, they look at your income, and assume that you’ll keep your job long enough to pay off the loan.

    Another common type of loan is a longer term loan that you get by pledging collateral. Car title loans. for example, allow you to borrow against the value of your automobile. The lender gives you cash, but in exchange you authorize them to take your vehicle if you fail to repay the loan on time. These loans can be especially problematic if you need your car to get to work and continue earning an income.

    Avoid Scams

    Borrowers looking to borrow without credit inquiries are desperate, so scammers are naturally easy to find in this space.

    The most common scams involve charging fees while providing nothing in return. Application fees are not unheard of, but beware of lenders who want fees up-front – you might not get what you pay for. Fees should be clearly disclosed up-front. If you get any “surprises,” start worrying. Reputable lenders tell you what to expect, while scam artists just take what they can for as long as you’ll give it to them. Any fees should be taken out of your loan proceeds after your loan is approved.

    You should also pay attention to what type of information your lender is asking for. Do they want your Social Security Number? Why do they need it if your credit doesn’t matter? They might end up running your credit (which can ding your credit scores) or using the information for identity theft. If you’re not 100% sure who you’re dealing with, keep your Social Security Number to yourself.

    If it sounds too good to be true, it usually is. Keep an eye out for overly optimistic promises: nobody can “guarantee” you anything – especially if they don’t you (they need to know a few things about you before deciding whether or not to lend money). Remember also that these loans are always going to be expensive because they are risky loans to make. If you don’t see some hefty costs involved (a high interest rate. or loan processing fees that will be taken out of your loan proceeds), you’re probably not getting the whole picture.

    Build Credit

    In order to avoid these types of loans in the future, start building credit as soon as possible. Someday you’ll be able to borrow much less expensively, and you’ll have more options available to you (such as longer term loans and higher credit limits ) if you build credit. For more information, see How to Build Credit .

    Before You Purchase Commercial Auto Business Insurance #cars #for #sale #online


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    Before You Purchase Commercial Auto Business Insurance

    By Gregory Boop. Business Insurance Expert

    Commercial auto insurance is one of the most important aspects of your business insurance program. If your business uses a vehicle, or many vehicles, you need commercial auto insurance and you will want to ask your business insurance professional some important questions. You will also want to provide your business insurance professional with a complete picture of your vehicle use.

    How Many Vehicles and Drivers Will the Business Insure?

    Commercial auto insurers often separate coverage types based on the number of vehicles and drivers to be insured. Fleet insurance is an option for businesses that will have a number of vehicles and drivers. The number of vehicles differs with each insurer and may depend on the class of vehicle. But, fleet insurance may be a less expensive alternative than individual, per vehicle policies.

    What is the Policy Definition of Commercial Use?

    Your personal auto policy will exclude coverage for commercial uses of your vehicle.

    A commercial policy will establish a definition of commercial use as well. It is important that you read the definition and discuss this with your insurance professional. If there is any question, it is better to obtain a commercial auto policy so that, in case of an accident, there is no chance of being uninsured.

    How Can You Lower Premium Costs?

    Commercial auto business insurance premiums can be lowered by:

    • Business Location – the location of the vehicles determines premiums for theft.
    • Driver Records – hire only qualified drivers with safe driving records.

    Continue Reading Below

    • Choice of Vehicle – sales people may want sports cars, but five-star safety rated, domestic, mid-sized sedans have the lowest premiums.
    • Deductibles – can your business afford part of the risk and maintain a high deductible? If so, your premiums will be lower.
    • Safety and Anti-Theft Devices – alarms, GPS tracking, air bags, seat belts, and other such devices can significantly lower premiums.
    • Insure U for Small Business Tips on Lowering Premiums

    Special Commercial Coverages and Considerations.

    What to Know Before Selecting and Buying a Used Car #auto #for #sale #by #owner


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    What to Know Before Selecting and Buying a Used Car

    March 19, 2014

    %img src=”http://i.ebayimg.com/00/$T2eC16hHJGMFFo!(TFPyBRqybUNyCg%3C/p%3E%0D%0A%3Cp%3E_35.JPG” /%

    When buying a used car, sometimes there are issues with the car that are not able to be seen upon first inspection. The buyer needs to ask the seller if the car has a clean or clear title. A clean title means that there are no major physical issues with the car. Sometimes, the term clear title is also used, but it is most often used to refer to the fact that there is not a financial lien against the car being sold.

    It is fairly easy, and very important, to check a car’s title before buying it, to make sure that it is clean and to verify details about the car. This is especially important for older model cars that may have had more than one owner. The most recent owner may not have been fully informed before buying the car himself. Most used cars that are being sold by individuals will not come with a warranty.

    Clean Title and Clear Title

    A clean title is usually used to refer to any car that passes inspection without having any serious physical issues. This ensures a higher quality car, when all the other features are also taken into consideration. A clear title is usually used to describe a financial lien that has been placed on a car. Some people use the terms interchangeably, so be sure to check which definition is meant by the seller. If a lien has been placed on a car, it would mean that any additional cost would be included in the price of the car. Optimally, a car should have both a clear and a clean title.

    Using CARFAX to Research a Car

    By using the service CARFAX, it helps someone who is shopping for a car to know almost everything about that car. Simply enter the VIN for the car, and the system will find all the recorded information about the car. The CARFAX report tells how many owners a car has had, and it shows the mileage that has been recorded when the car has been sold. It also shares any problems with the car, such as if it has been in an accident or flood, or if the car has been driven above or below the average mileage for a car of the same age. The report makes it easy to see the history of the car at a glance and if the value of the car lines up with what the seller is asking for the car.

    Using the Kelley Blue Book to Confirm the Value of a Car

    Another important aspect to consider when buying a car, in addition to a clean title, would be making sure that the asking price of a car matches up, within reason, to the value of the car. One useful tool for determining that is the Kelley Blue Book. The condition of the car, mileage, and other factors will determine the price of the car. As long as the car has a clean title, and the Blue Book value is fair, then it will help to negotiate the price.

    Reasons a Car Would Not Have a Clean Title

    There are multiple reasons why a car would not have a clean title. Many of these are things that are not immediately visible to a casual inspection. In addition to having a trusted mechanic inspect any car that is being considered for purchase, it is important to verify that the car has a clean title. A CARFAX report will list all recorded physical damage to the car.

    Not having a clean title does not make a sale impossible. As long as the buyer is aware of the issues, and the price is fair, the sale can be finalized. Many people buy cars without a clean title for the specific purpose of rebuilding cars or for parts. Even after it is rebuilt, it will retain a non-clean title, but it can be resold at a higher price later.

    Rebuilt or Reconstructed

    If a car has been rebuilt or reconstructed, that means it will have had a salvage title. While this may still be a good car to buy, it is not a clean title. Depending on the work done, and the price being asked, a rebuilt car is often in better shape than a car of the same year that has not had work done. The value of a rebuild can be higher, if better parts or better quality paint were used in the work.

    Salvage or Junk

    A salvage, or junk title, is assigned to a car that has been in an accident and is cost prohibitive to being fixed. It is often referred to as totaled, even though the car is sometimes still drivable. If the car requires repairs that cost more than three-fourths of the car’s original value, it qualifies for the salvage title. Any car that has a salvage or junk title does not qualify for a clean title.

    Hail Damage

    Hail damage is another issue that can prevent a car from having a clean title. Hail damage could be repaired cosmetically, by taking out the dents and repainting it, and might not be noticeable. However, the metal would be weakened and prone to being damaged easily again. There is no engine damage, normally, when a car has sustained hail damage.

    Flood Damage

    A car that has been damaged by flood water also will not have a clean title. This damage is a little harder to notice; however, it is probably one of the more problematic. It may not make visible damage to the car if cleaned up before it starts to rust. The engine would take a lot of work to repair and would be costly. It can also cause mold issues behind the dashboard and problems with the electrical systems. If an older car has new upholstery in the interior, it may be an indication that it was in a flood. Flood damage is more prevalent in coastal areas, as well as along rivers. It is a good idea to check the location that is listed on the title to see if it originates from an area that is prone to flooding.

    Fire Damage

    Fire damage to a car can also be fixed, but there may be some damage that is not noticed in the wiring system. It could cause serious problems in the future. The damage to the car itself is obvious; paint will not stick to the metal once it has been burned, so parts will have to be replaced. If there was fire damage, similar to flood damage, new upholstery would be an indication that there was damaged interior that had to be replaced.

    Not Accurate Mileage

    The mileage of a car is one of the factors that will determine the value of the car. It is important that the mileage be accurate so that the buyer gets a fair price. It is illegal to physically change the mileage of a car. One instance where the mileage can change on a car would be if the instrument cluster was changed. In order to still get a clean title, it must be noted in the title that it has been changed.

    How to Buy a Car on eBay Motors With a Clean Title

    When searching for a car on eBay Motors. it is good to add the word “clean title ” to the search. If the seller has certified the car as having a clean title, it will show up in the search and help narrow down the search. There are different makes and models of cars and trucks available, so it is also helpful to add a year or other feature to help find the best car for your needs.

    Getting to Know the Seller

    When investing in a car, it is important to know the reputation of the seller. Top-rated Sellers on eBay Motors help ensure a better transaction. Reading the feedback that has been left by other buyers also helps to make a good choice. There may not be much feedback, unless the seller is a dealer, so what feedback is there is even more important to read over carefully.

    Conclusion

    When buying cars, knowing the value of the car is only one part of purchasing the car. It is also important to check for a clean title. By knowing that a car has a clean title, there are fewer potential problems in the future. Many of the problems that cause issues, that would make a clean title impossible, are often hard to see on first inspection of the car. Using the CARFAX report will confirm that the listing of a car with a clean title does indeed have a clean title.

    Some people want to buy a car without a clean title for parts or to rebuild for recreational purposes, like drag racing, so knowing that the title is not clean may allow the buyer to negotiate the price. The Kelley Blue Book listing will allow the negotiations to go easier.

    6 Things Every Sucker Should Know Before Buying a Used Car #matthews #auto


    #buying a used car
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    6 Things Every Sucker Should Know Before Buying a Used Car

    By: Robert Brockway

    | October 25, 2012

    1,274,221 views 866

    Buying a used car is like going to a dentist who wants to knock out your old teeth and sell you new ones. Everybody involved in the process is assuredly biased, possibly psychotic, and actively wants to do you bodily harm. More sad, dissatisfied people have left car dealerships than strip clubs, and it’s no wonder: Cars are extremely complicated, terribly expensive, and for some reason every one is guarded by a small gang of pathological liars. It’s one of the worst experiences of your life, and you need somebody trustworthy to help you. Unfortunately, you’ve got me. Lucky for you, I have bought and destroyed more cars than is technically allowable by the United States government, and am therefore legally obligated to actually try to help you in this column, which I do as a “service” to the “community.” I think we can get through this, if you take my advice to heart.*

    *Well, except for all the times I tell you to “flip the table on them bitches.” That’s just some good general advice I try to work in everywhere, and may not be applicable to the situation at hand.

    #6. Do Your Research

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    Never, ever walk into a dealership “just to see what they’ve got.” Salesmen see that aimless stare on your face and they’re like starving cartoon wolves — they don’t even see a person; all they see is a giant walking turkey leg. Most small and midsize dealerships will have online inventories. Check those out in advance and start looking up the models you’re interested in, then read up on each one: Comb through car sites like Edmunds, click on forum posts by owners, get the specs and find out about users’ experience with reliability — hell, go to Wikipedia and bone up on the entire history of the model and the powertrain you’re considering. Back in school, you’d do the same amount of research for a book report on Huck Finn just because an older lady in a paneled skirt threatened you with the alphabet — you can do the same legwork for a multi-thousand-dollar purchase you’re going to entrust your life to every time you leave the house to get a burrito. Whatever you do, the point is to come in with a mental list: Do not let them steer you outside of that list to a car that you’re not familiar with. Adventure is wondrous and grand, but the used car lot is not the place to listen to strange old men in tattered clothes whisper of magical chariots.

    “It’s dangerous to go alone. Take this Daihatsu!”

    Now this is the important part, so pay attention: No matter what anybody tells you — no matter how respectable the source — never, ever, ever buy the Kia. Regardless of dealership affiliation, every used car lot on the planet has a dull red Kia out back that they want to show you. It’s going to feel wrong, somehow, like the air around it has gone stale. That’s the universe trying to warn you. There will be rational arguments, and your brain is gonna be all like, “Hey, it sounds like they’ve gotten a lot better lately,” and, “Look, even the car magazines think they’ve got some decent models.” But there’s a very simple explanation for this illusion: It’s a vast government conspiracy and everybody is in on it but me. They are terrible cars that will explode and betray you, no matter how meticulously you care for them. Isn’t that right, Optima, you fickle bitch?! You broke my heart! And for what? A measly 15,000 miles? I thought we had something! I spent two years inside of you. Does that mean nothing?!

    #5. Dealing With the Dealer

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    You need to treat the first few moments at a dealership like an old-timey mobster being interrogated by the coppers: You don’t say nothin’ about nothin’. Financing? What’s that? Trade-ins? Ha, what a hilarious portmanteau of gibberish! Price range? I don’t even speak English.

    The first step is just and only to find the car you want, go over it carefully, take stock of any work that needs doing, and barter out the final price. Only when that’s all settled do you talk about trading in something. Why would you discuss trade-ins right up front if you haven’t even found a car you like? You’re not even sure you’re shopping there yet. The grocery store doesn’t pull you aside when you walk in the doors and ask how much you’re planning to spend today. So why do dealerships always want to know your price, payment and trades first? Because it gives them leverage against you: “Oh, well, if we’re going to do you a favor and take this trade-in off your hands, you have to buy one of these pre-selected vehicles.” Or, “Oh, you’re financing? Those aren’t our finance cars. Our finance cars are all dull red Kias; let’s go out back and take a look.”

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    “Ignore the disembodied voices telling you to flee. That’s a. feature. Ghost-voicing. Costs extra.”

    That’s bullshit. Everything is a finance car. Just like everything is a cash car. The car does not care how you pay for it. It is a car. Even if it becomes sentient, it’s mostly only going to care about fighting crime and ramping shit, like K.I.T.T. from Knight Rider. And brother, if that happens: You let it. You buy yourself a leather jacket and a perm and get the fuck out of there; your car search is over.

    #4. Vehicle Inspection

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    There are a few basic things you can check, even if you know nothing about cars. First thing you want to do is get right up close against the side of the front fender. (This should also serve to draw out any potential sentient-car crime-fighting partners, as they cannot resist wisecracking and will likely say something cute like, “Geez, buy me dinner first.” If so, then you’re done: It’s all cowhide coverings and curly hair for the rest of your days.) If there’s little to no rapport between you and the vehicle at this point, just sight down the trim lines to make sure they’re straight with no fluctuations — offset doors, fenders, and uneven lines could indicate frame damage. Look around the engine bay at the spots where the metal struts come together — the joints should be straight, with no signs of recent welding. Take a look underneath the car and watch for rust on the rails, in the wheel wells, or basically anywhere else. Be afraid of rust. Rust is the mind-killer. You’ll think you can take rust — it’s just some pansy little oxidation, right? But you can’t. Rust is better than you. Rust will laugh at your feeble angle grinders; it will spit at your steel wool and mock your puny acids. Rust will shrug off all your mightiest efforts and then, when you are broken, it will take your woman in a way that you never could.

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    “F. from behind? I don’t know, man; I’m just a chemical process.”

    Also remember to CHECK. THE. FUCKING. FLUIDS. Don’t just stare at the engine with your dick in your hand, wondering if you could stop the flywheel with your cock (no matter how awesome it would be to seize a V8 with nothing but your willpower and steely erection, this is not the time for it). Pull those dipsticks out and check the reservoirs. Brake fluid is, in an ideal world, clear to slightly yellowish. But the world we live in is broken and flawed, so it’s usually tea-colored. If it looks like strong coffee, you’re going to need to bleed the brake system, at the very least. That’s a few hundred dollars right there. It doesn’t require a lot of know-how or expensive parts, so you’re going to want to do it yourself.

    Do not.

    Bleeding brakes is exactly as traumatic as bleeding your only child, only it takes like, four times as long (depending on size and age of child). Check the oil: If it looks like a Wendy’s chocolate Frosty, just turn around and run. Run as fast as you can. Hop into your car and tear ass out of that dealership like The Dukes of Hazzard. That means a blown head-gasket, and it is death. If somebody assures you, “It’ll still run,” you can respond, “So will a man with no legs, if you shoot at him enough; that doesn’t mean he’ll get far.” (The casual murder references let ’em know you mean business.)

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    “Hi, Bob. Nice to meet you. I’ve killed four men. Every one of them stole from me.”

    Make sure the coolant is clear, the transmission fluid is red or purplish (just not black or oily) and all the belts and hoses are free of cracks. Finally, if it’s a new car or a big expense, you buy yourself a copy of a program like Torque, then go on eBay and get an ODBII scanner. Plug that into the car (the ODB slot is usually beneath the dash on the driver’s side) and you can see literally everything about its engine in real time, right there on your smartphone. Do me a favor and look at the salesman’s face when you do it: See that expression? That’s what hope looks like, as it leaves the world. He’s just realized he’s not going to win this one, because you’re from the future — you’ve already done this deal.

    Philly Auto Show: 7 things to know before you go #internet #auto #sales


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    Philly Auto Show: 7 things to know before you go

    The 2015 Philadelphia Auto Show will once again grace the floors of the Pennsylvania Convention Center. And if you’re there for fun or are looking to figure out which car will be your next, the show is definitely the place to go.

    But before you head out and get revved up here are a few things you might want to know:

    1.) The show opens on Saturday, Jan. 31 and runs through Sunday, Feb. 8. On Saturdays and Sundays the show opens at 9 a.m. and on weekdays, at noon.

    2.) At a lot of auto shows, you can’t get in and sit in the cars. But at the Philly auto show, hop right in. Nearly every manufacturer’s display welcomes people to sit inside the vehicles, pop the hood and kick the tires.

    Guests can’t sit in the concept or exotic vehicles, though.

    3.) The auto show features more than 700 vehicles from more than 40 car manufacturers in 700,000 square feet of space. said Donald Franks, the chair of this year’s auto show. So take your time and pace yourself. There are a lot of cars to see here.

    4.) Pre-production cars are worth a look. These vehicles, not yet on the market, include the 2016 Buick Cascada, 2016 Fiat 500 X, 2016 Ford Explorer, 2016 Honda HR-V, 2016 Lincoln MKX, 2016 Mazda CX-3 and the 2016 Nissan Titan.

    “We have a lot of great new cars lined up,” said Franks.

    5.) Don’t miss the concept car. This year’s concept car, the Buick Avenir, is a sedan that has a sleek progressive design with new levels of passenger well-being and technology integration.

    “There’s a lot of technology in these new cars and we’re seeing driver assist and self-driving cars,” Franks said.

    6.) Check out Camp Jeep. At Camp Jeep, where there will be a rock climbing wall for those adventurous show-goers. Called the ultimate indoor off-road driving test. The 25,000-square foot Camp Jeep exhibit gives auto show attendees a chance to experience the extreme off-road capabilities of Jeep vehicles without leaving the show floor. Guests can choose from Jeep Wrangler Unlimited, Wrangler Rubicon and Grand Cherokee.

    7.) Ride and drive. This year, people interested in taking a test drive, can do that in a Kia or Toyota. Test drive around the city a new Camry, Corolla, Rav4 AWD and the Highlander. If you’re interested in a Kia, test drive a K900, Optima, Soul, Sedona, Sorento or a Sportage.

    Philadelphia Auto Show tickets are $13 for adults, $6 for seniors and children, children 6 and under are free. For more information, visit www.phillyautoshow.com .

    Title Check – Look before you buy #auto #park


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    Title Check – Look before you buy

    Welcome to Title Check!

    Here you can select an approved provider to check the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) of the vehicle you want to purchase to find out if it is salvaged, rebuilt, or was damaged in a flood. This is one of the most important steps you can take to protect yourself before making your purchase.

    Here’s what you do to complete a Title Check:

    1. Get the VIN of the vehicle you want to buy.
    2. Have your credit card available.
    3. Select one of the approved providers below. Prices begin at only a couple dollars so you may want to shop the vendors before making a selection. Be sure to note what is offered for the price.
    4. Follow the steps to obtain the report.

    The VIN is run through the National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS), a national consumer protection database that provides title information from states across the country. Whether you are buying from a local dealer, individual or eyeing a vehicle from an online auction website, it will help you to know what you are buying before you pay any money or sign any paperwork for the vehicle.

    A report from the NMVTIS database gives you the vehicle’s title history, which includes whether the vehicle was ever in the possession of a junk or salvage yard or declared a “total loss” by an insurance company.

    Protect your title, Texas.

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    What to Know Before You Buy Car Insurance Online – Allstate


    #buy auto insurance online
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    What to Know Before You Buy Car Insurance Online

    Buying car insurance online can be challenging. Sure, there are dozens maybe even hundreds of auto insurance providers vying for your business through interactive websites that allow you to do everything from getting a simple quote to closing the deal on coverage. But if you’ve got any questions that need answering beforehand, your best bet is to pick up the phone and talk to an agent directly .

    Of course, you may not have to do that. If your needs are simple, you may be able to seal the deal without even picking up the phone. Here are a few things to know about buying car insurance online.

    You will be asked to provide specific details about the car you’re insuring.

    It’s not enough to be able to key the make, model and year of your vehicle into an online car insurance quote form. Beyond those basics, you may be asked a number of detailed questions that will help the insurance company give you the most accurate quote. Be sure you have the following additional information handy when you buy car insurance online.

    What You Need to Know Before You Get an Auto Loan


    #best auto loans
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    Before You Get an Auto Loan

    By Justin Pritchard. Banking/Loans Expert

    Justin Pritchard helps consumers navigate the world of banking.

    For a successful auto purchase, you ve got to get several things right: choose the right car, get a good price, and fund the purchase in the most affordable way. If you re going to borrow for your auto purchase, it pays to know how to get a great auto loan .

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    Plus, when it s time to make a deal, you ll be ready — and you ll be on the road that much more quickly.

    Key to a Great Auto Loan #1: Manage Your Credit

    One of the first things you should do before applying for an auto loan is review your credit. All US consumers are entitled to a free credit report under federal law, so exercise your rights. Make sure that your credit looks as good as it possibly can — it will affect the interest rate you get, and therefore your monthly payments. Find out if there’s anything on your reports that needs fixing.

    Key to a Great Auto Loan #2: Know How Much You Can Spend

    Diligent budgeters already know this, but most people don t put enough thought into it before it s too late. Get a clear idea of how much you can spend (down payment and monthly payments) before you start looking at cars. If you fall in love with a vehicle before you know whether or not it s in your budget, some salespeople can make it appear as if the car is affordable with fancy math and long term loans .

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    In reality, you ll end up with a loan that costs too much and that you ll be stuck with for years.

    Key to a Great Auto Loan #3: Look at the Big Picture

    The terms of your auto loan will determine how much you pay now and how much the auto loan costs overall. Remember that a low cost now may not mean low total costs for you in the big picture.

    For example, most borrowers choose a low down payment because it’s easy to manage today. However, that choice increases the total cost of your auto loan and usually leaves you ‘upside-down’ (meaning you owe more on the vehicle than it’s worth) for years to come.

    Figure out exactly what your loan will look like — month by month — by running your loan details through a loan amortization calculator. You ll learn how much you re spending on interest and how much you ll still owe on any given date in the future.

    Key to a Great Auto Loan #4: Consider Insurance

    When you ask various lenders what they’ll offer you, you may find that you need insurance to get the best auto loans. I’m referring to disability insurance and life insurance at this point. The lender is concerned that something could happen to you and you won’t be able to pay them back.

    Having insurance might not be a requirement, but it might be helpful to have the details of any coverage you have available. Even knowing that you have coverage (even if you don t know how much) can be helpful in moving your purchase along.

    Key to a Great Auto Loan #5: Shop Around

    This is simple but it is often overlooked. The most important point here is that you don’t have to get your auto loan from the dealership. Check with a credit union. bank, online lender, or P2P lending source. In most cases your car dealer won’t have the best auto loan (but in some cases the dealer s offer can t be beat). By consulting with an alternate lender before stepping onto the lot, you’ll be armed with knowledge of what’s available to you — and that gives you bargaining power.

    Things change in life and flexibility is important. Your auto loan should also be flexible. Find a lender that will allow you to make extra payments or pay off the loan entirely without any penalties. It’s important to read the fine print – some penalties aren’t called “penalties”.