Auto Loan Surge Fuels Fears Of Another Subprime Crisis: NPR #cars #for #sale #by #owner


#subprime auto lenders
#

Listen to the Story

Auto dealers are extending loans to a growing number of people with weak credit.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The number of Americans buying autos approached a record high last year. It’s one more sign of how much the economy is improving.

But there’s a big potential downside that’s evoking comparisons to the subprime mortgage boom. Auto dealers are extending loans to a growing number of people with weak credit, and more of them are having trouble making payments.

When Chris Westervelt moved from Texas to Alaska to take a job, he decided to trade in his Mazda for a car that could handle snow and ice.

“I started looking at vehicles that had four-wheel drive capabilities and I ended up settling on a Jeep Wrangler,” Westervelt says.

He went to a dealer and test drove a car. “They said, ‘Go ahead and take the Jeep home, you know, come back sometime tomorrow and, you know, we’ll get everything settled,’ ” Westervelt says. “So, after driving around a little and coming back, the store manager actually got a little aggressive with me. He’s like, ‘You’ve already put 200 miles on my Jeep. What am I going to do? I can’t resell this,’ ” Westervelt says.


Import Auto-Complete List from another computer #used #cars #and #trucks


#auto computer
#

Import Auto-Complete List from another computer

The Auto-Complete List is a feature which displays suggestions for names and e-mail addresses as you begin to type them. These suggestions are possible matches from a list of names and e-mail addresses from the e-mail messages that you have sent.

In Microsoft Outlook 2010, the Auto-Complete List is no longer saved in a file with an extension of .nk2. The Auto-Complete List entries are now saved in your Microsoft Exchange Server mailbox or in the Outlook Data File (.pst) for your account. However, if you want to copy the Auto-Complete List (.nk2) from another computer that was using a POP3 email account or an older version of Outlook, you must import the file.

Step 1: Copy the Auto-Complete file from the old computer

Because the default folder is hidden folder, the easiest way to open the folder is to use the command %APPDATA%\Microsoft\Outlook on the Start menu.

Windows 7     Click Start. Next to the Shut down button, in the Search programs and files box, type %APPDATA%\Microsoft\Outlook and then press Enter.

Windows Vista     Click Start. Next to the Shut Down button, in the Search box, type %APPDATA%\Microsoft\Outlook and then press Enter.

Windows XP     Click Start. click Run. type %APPDATA%\Microsoft\Outlook and then press Enter.

After you press Enter, the folder where your Auto-Complete List file is saved opens.

Note    By default, file extensions are hidden in Windows. To change whether file extensions are shown, in Window Explorer on the Tools menu (in Windows 7 or Windows Vista, press the ALT key to see the Tools menu), click Folder Options. On the View tab select or clear the Hide extensions for known file types check box.

Copy the file to the new computer. The file is small and can be placed on a removable media such as a USB memory stick.

Step 2: Copy the Auto-Complete file to the new computer

On the new computer, in Control Panel, click or double-click Mail .

Where is Mail in Control Panel?

Mail appears in different Control Panel locations depending upon the version of the Microsoft Windows operating system, Control Panel view selected, and whether a 32- or 64-bit operating system or version of Outlook 2010 is installed.

The easiest way to locate Mail is to open Control Panel in Windows, and then in the Search box at the top of window, type Mail. In Control Panel for Windows XP, type Mail in the Address box.

Note    The Mail icon appears after Outlook starts for the first time.

Click Show Profiles .

Make a note of the name of the profile. You will need to change the .nk2 file name to match the name later.

Copy the .nk2 file to the new computer in the folder where Outlook configurations are saved. Because this folder is hidden folder, the easiest way to open the folder is to use the command %APPDATA%\Microsoft\Outlook on the Start menu.

Windows 7     Click Start. Next to the Shut down button, in the Search programs and files box, type %APPDATA%\Microsoft\Outlook and then press Enter.

Windows Vista     Click Start. Next to the Shut Down button, in the Search box, type %APPDATA%\Microsoft\Outlook and then press Enter.

Windows XP     Click Start. click Run. type %APPDATA%\Microsoft\Outlook and then press Enter.

After the file is coped to the folder, right-click the file, click Rename. and change the name to match the profile name that appeared in step 3.

Step 3: Import the Auto-Complete List

You are now ready to start Outlook and import the file, but you must start Outlook with a special one-time command.

Do one of the following:

Windows 7     Click Start. Next to the Shut down button, in the Search programs and files box, type outlook /importnk2 and then press Enter.

Windows Vista     Click Start. Next to the Shut Down button, in the Search box, type outlook /importnk2 and then press Enter.

Windows XP     Click Start. click Run. type outlook /importnk2 and then press Enter.

The Auto-Complete List should now have the entries from your other computer when you compose a message and begin typing in the To. Cc. or Bcc boxes.


How to automatically redirect a browser to another web page from one of your own #used #honda #civic


#auto web
#

Server-based redirect

This is the preferred method of redirecting to other web pages, and additional information can be found at http://www.w3.org/QA/Tips/reback.

As the P-A Department’s main web server uses the Apache HTTP server program, here is how to do it on that system (for other systems’ servers, see the references in the www.w3.org web page noted above).

Create a file in the directory in question called ” .htaccess ” and put into it the line

Redirect /path-of-file-to-be-redirected URL-of-page-to-go-to

For example, if you are a professor teaching the (fictitious – for the sake of the example only) PHY386 course during Spring Semester 2007, but you want to keep your web pages in a subdirectory of your own user area instead of in the courses area provided, you can go to the appropriate courses area on the server, /web/documents/courses/2007spring/PHY386 and put

Redirect /courses/2007spring/PHY386/index.html http://www.pa.msu.edu/people/username/subdir/index.htm

(all on one line, in case the above example is wrapped by your browser) into a file called .htaccess which has world-read permissions (that’s the default).

The “path” argument is relative to the “web root”, so in the above example, “/web/documents” is left off. The “page to go to” URL is a full URL, even if the web page is on the same server. More than one Redirect command can be put into the .htaccess file, and you can redirect all files in a directory to their equivalents in a “to go to” directory by leaving the filenames off.

A case where more than one Redirect command may be necessary is when a web page may be accessed via more than one URL. In the above “PHY 386” example, in fact, the instructor will have to add a second line, the same as the first, except for lower-case “phy386” instead of “PHY386” in the “path” argument, because the web page may be accessed with the “phy386” URL, too. During Spring Semester 2007, the page could also be accessed with URLs with “current” in place of “2007spring” and with “2007spring” left out entirely, bringing the number of Redirect commands up to six for that one page. Fortunately, a URL which leaves off the “index.html” filename defaults to assuming it, or else three more Redirect commands would be needed to handle those cases. (The folks at w3.org still consider this as preferable to a single “refresh” meta command in the file itself, which would be read and acted upon regardless of how the file was accessed, as described below.)

If there is already a .htaccess file in the subdirectory in question, see the Apache HTTP server documentation to see where in it the Redirect command should be placed. If you are the person running the Apache web server program on a system, you can also put instances of the Redirect command into the server configuration file instead of, or in addition to. htaccess files in specific subdirectories (again, see the Apache HTTP server documentation for the details).

“refresh” meta command

Note that this method is deprecated by the official HTML standards organization in favor of the server-based redirect method described above.

You can set up a web page to inform any browser which happens to load it that there is another web page it should go to instead, after an optional delay.

This is accomplished using a “refresh” meta command in the header section of your HTML file, along with the title and any “keywords” or other meta commands.

The syntax for the “refresh” meta command is

meta http-equiv="refresh" content=" N ; URL= other-web-address "

where N is the approximate number of seconds that you want the current web page to be displayed before the browser automatically goes to the other web address. If N = 0. then the browser should go immediately to the other web address.

Netiquette tip

In case someone’s browser doesn’t handle these automatic redirects (most browsers do handle them, but some allow them to be turned off, as a way of discouraging “web spam”, which often uses this type of “refresh” redirect), you may want to provide a second route to the intended destination by way of a standard link (see the example, below).

Select Example above or here to see how the example works in practice.

Notes on scripting languages

There are also ways of doing this with JavaScript, VBscript, and other internal web page scripting languages, but explaining them in detail is beyond the scope of this web page. A few examples may illustrate the method, however, and encourage users to obtain actual JavaScript documentation (a book, or online) to guide them in developing their own variants suited to their own needs.

The following JavaScript example, which would go ahead of the first html flag on the web page, or between the HEAD and /HEAD tags, opens the new site in the same browser window (effectively instead of the rest of the contents of the page that the script is in):

This JavaScript example opens the new site in the same browser window after displaying the current page in the window for 2 seconds (2000 ms):

(Note that this does exactly what the HTML META tag above does, but as the META tag method does not depend on the browser’s having JavaScript available and active, in most cases the META tag method would be preferable).

The next JavaScript example opens the new site in a new * browser window:

This JavaScript example opens the new site in a new browser window after a 4.5 second (4500 ms) delay:

WARNING: With these capabilities for automatic redirection to other web pages, it is possible to set up a redirection loop — try to avoid making it a no-wait-time infinite loop! (An infinite loop with a reasonable delay, on the other hand, might have its uses as a sort of slide show, among other possibilities). Still have questions? Try sites such as http://www.w3.org/. http://httpd.apache.org/. http://www.iis.net/ or http://www.javascript.com/ (or just use Google ).


Auto Loan Surge Fuels Fears Of Another Subprime Crisis: NPR #nada #auto


#subprime auto lenders
#

Listen to the Story

Auto dealers are extending loans to a growing number of people with weak credit.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The number of Americans buying autos approached a record high last year. It’s one more sign of how much the economy is improving.

But there’s a big potential downside that’s evoking comparisons to the subprime mortgage boom. Auto dealers are extending loans to a growing number of people with weak credit, and more of them are having trouble making payments.

When Chris Westervelt moved from Texas to Alaska to take a job, he decided to trade in his Mazda for a car that could handle snow and ice.

“I started looking at vehicles that had four-wheel drive capabilities and I ended up settling on a Jeep Wrangler,” Westervelt says.

He went to a dealer and test drove a car. “They said, ‘Go ahead and take the Jeep home, you know, come back sometime tomorrow and, you know, we’ll get everything settled,’ ” Westervelt says. “So, after driving around a little and coming back, the store manager actually got a little aggressive with me. He’s like, ‘You’ve already put 200 miles on my Jeep. What am I going to do? I can’t resell this,’ ” Westervelt says.


How to automatically redirect a browser to another web page from one of your own #classic #autos #for #sale


#auto web
#

Server-based redirect

This is the preferred method of redirecting to other web pages, and additional information can be found at http://www.w3.org/QA/Tips/reback.

As the P-A Department’s main web server uses the Apache HTTP server program, here is how to do it on that system (for other systems’ servers, see the references in the www.w3.org web page noted above).

Create a file in the directory in question called ” .htaccess ” and put into it the line

Redirect /path-of-file-to-be-redirected URL-of-page-to-go-to

For example, if you are a professor teaching the (fictitious – for the sake of the example only) PHY386 course during Spring Semester 2007, but you want to keep your web pages in a subdirectory of your own user area instead of in the courses area provided, you can go to the appropriate courses area on the server, /web/documents/courses/2007spring/PHY386 and put

Redirect /courses/2007spring/PHY386/index.html http://www.pa.msu.edu/people/username/subdir/index.htm

(all on one line, in case the above example is wrapped by your browser) into a file called .htaccess which has world-read permissions (that’s the default).

The “path” argument is relative to the “web root”, so in the above example, “/web/documents” is left off. The “page to go to” URL is a full URL, even if the web page is on the same server. More than one Redirect command can be put into the .htaccess file, and you can redirect all files in a directory to their equivalents in a “to go to” directory by leaving the filenames off.

A case where more than one Redirect command may be necessary is when a web page may be accessed via more than one URL. In the above “PHY 386” example, in fact, the instructor will have to add a second line, the same as the first, except for lower-case “phy386” instead of “PHY386” in the “path” argument, because the web page may be accessed with the “phy386” URL, too. During Spring Semester 2007, the page could also be accessed with URLs with “current” in place of “2007spring” and with “2007spring” left out entirely, bringing the number of Redirect commands up to six for that one page. Fortunately, a URL which leaves off the “index.html” filename defaults to assuming it, or else three more Redirect commands would be needed to handle those cases. (The folks at w3.org still consider this as preferable to a single “refresh” meta command in the file itself, which would be read and acted upon regardless of how the file was accessed, as described below.)

If there is already a .htaccess file in the subdirectory in question, see the Apache HTTP server documentation to see where in it the Redirect command should be placed. If you are the person running the Apache web server program on a system, you can also put instances of the Redirect command into the server configuration file instead of, or in addition to. htaccess files in specific subdirectories (again, see the Apache HTTP server documentation for the details).

“refresh” meta command

Note that this method is deprecated by the official HTML standards organization in favor of the server-based redirect method described above.

You can set up a web page to inform any browser which happens to load it that there is another web page it should go to instead, after an optional delay.

This is accomplished using a “refresh” meta command in the header section of your HTML file, along with the title and any “keywords” or other meta commands.

The syntax for the “refresh” meta command is

meta http-equiv="refresh" content=" N ; URL= other-web-address "

where N is the approximate number of seconds that you want the current web page to be displayed before the browser automatically goes to the other web address. If N = 0. then the browser should go immediately to the other web address.

Netiquette tip

In case someone’s browser doesn’t handle these automatic redirects (most browsers do handle them, but some allow them to be turned off, as a way of discouraging “web spam”, which often uses this type of “refresh” redirect), you may want to provide a second route to the intended destination by way of a standard link (see the example, below).

Select Example above or here to see how the example works in practice.

Notes on scripting languages

There are also ways of doing this with JavaScript, VBscript, and other internal web page scripting languages, but explaining them in detail is beyond the scope of this web page. A few examples may illustrate the method, however, and encourage users to obtain actual JavaScript documentation (a book, or online) to guide them in developing their own variants suited to their own needs.

The following JavaScript example, which would go ahead of the first html flag on the web page, or between the HEAD and /HEAD tags, opens the new site in the same browser window (effectively instead of the rest of the contents of the page that the script is in):

This JavaScript example opens the new site in the same browser window after displaying the current page in the window for 2 seconds (2000 ms):

(Note that this does exactly what the HTML META tag above does, but as the META tag method does not depend on the browser’s having JavaScript available and active, in most cases the META tag method would be preferable).

The next JavaScript example opens the new site in a new * browser window:

This JavaScript example opens the new site in a new browser window after a 4.5 second (4500 ms) delay:

WARNING: With these capabilities for automatic redirection to other web pages, it is possible to set up a redirection loop — try to avoid making it a no-wait-time infinite loop! (An infinite loop with a reasonable delay, on the other hand, might have its uses as a sort of slide show, among other possibilities). Still have questions? Try sites such as http://www.w3.org/. http://httpd.apache.org/. http://www.iis.net/ or http://www.javascript.com/ (or just use Google ).


How to automatically redirect a browser to another web page from one of your own #used #cars #under #3000


#auto web
#

Server-based redirect

This is the preferred method of redirecting to other web pages, and additional information can be found at http://www.w3.org/QA/Tips/reback.

As the P-A Department’s main web server uses the Apache HTTP server program, here is how to do it on that system (for other systems’ servers, see the references in the www.w3.org web page noted above).

Create a file in the directory in question called ” .htaccess ” and put into it the line

Redirect /path-of-file-to-be-redirected URL-of-page-to-go-to

For example, if you are a professor teaching the (fictitious – for the sake of the example only) PHY386 course during Spring Semester 2007, but you want to keep your web pages in a subdirectory of your own user area instead of in the courses area provided, you can go to the appropriate courses area on the server, /web/documents/courses/2007spring/PHY386 and put

Redirect /courses/2007spring/PHY386/index.html http://www.pa.msu.edu/people/username/subdir/index.htm

(all on one line, in case the above example is wrapped by your browser) into a file called .htaccess which has world-read permissions (that’s the default).

The “path” argument is relative to the “web root”, so in the above example, “/web/documents” is left off. The “page to go to” URL is a full URL, even if the web page is on the same server. More than one Redirect command can be put into the .htaccess file, and you can redirect all files in a directory to their equivalents in a “to go to” directory by leaving the filenames off.

A case where more than one Redirect command may be necessary is when a web page may be accessed via more than one URL. In the above “PHY 386” example, in fact, the instructor will have to add a second line, the same as the first, except for lower-case “phy386” instead of “PHY386” in the “path” argument, because the web page may be accessed with the “phy386” URL, too. During Spring Semester 2007, the page could also be accessed with URLs with “current” in place of “2007spring” and with “2007spring” left out entirely, bringing the number of Redirect commands up to six for that one page. Fortunately, a URL which leaves off the “index.html” filename defaults to assuming it, or else three more Redirect commands would be needed to handle those cases. (The folks at w3.org still consider this as preferable to a single “refresh” meta command in the file itself, which would be read and acted upon regardless of how the file was accessed, as described below.)

If there is already a .htaccess file in the subdirectory in question, see the Apache HTTP server documentation to see where in it the Redirect command should be placed. If you are the person running the Apache web server program on a system, you can also put instances of the Redirect command into the server configuration file instead of, or in addition to. htaccess files in specific subdirectories (again, see the Apache HTTP server documentation for the details).

“refresh” meta command

Note that this method is deprecated by the official HTML standards organization in favor of the server-based redirect method described above.

You can set up a web page to inform any browser which happens to load it that there is another web page it should go to instead, after an optional delay.

This is accomplished using a “refresh” meta command in the header section of your HTML file, along with the title and any “keywords” or other meta commands.

The syntax for the “refresh” meta command is

meta http-equiv="refresh" content=" N ; URL= other-web-address "

where N is the approximate number of seconds that you want the current web page to be displayed before the browser automatically goes to the other web address. If N = 0. then the browser should go immediately to the other web address.

Netiquette tip

In case someone’s browser doesn’t handle these automatic redirects (most browsers do handle them, but some allow them to be turned off, as a way of discouraging “web spam”, which often uses this type of “refresh” redirect), you may want to provide a second route to the intended destination by way of a standard link (see the example, below).

Select Example above or here to see how the example works in practice.

Notes on scripting languages

There are also ways of doing this with JavaScript, VBscript, and other internal web page scripting languages, but explaining them in detail is beyond the scope of this web page. A few examples may illustrate the method, however, and encourage users to obtain actual JavaScript documentation (a book, or online) to guide them in developing their own variants suited to their own needs.

The following JavaScript example, which would go ahead of the first html flag on the web page, or between the HEAD and /HEAD tags, opens the new site in the same browser window (effectively instead of the rest of the contents of the page that the script is in):

This JavaScript example opens the new site in the same browser window after displaying the current page in the window for 2 seconds (2000 ms):

(Note that this does exactly what the HTML META tag above does, but as the META tag method does not depend on the browser’s having JavaScript available and active, in most cases the META tag method would be preferable).

The next JavaScript example opens the new site in a new * browser window:

This JavaScript example opens the new site in a new browser window after a 4.5 second (4500 ms) delay:

WARNING: With these capabilities for automatic redirection to other web pages, it is possible to set up a redirection loop — try to avoid making it a no-wait-time infinite loop! (An infinite loop with a reasonable delay, on the other hand, might have its uses as a sort of slide show, among other possibilities). Still have questions? Try sites such as http://www.w3.org/. http://httpd.apache.org/. http://www.iis.net/ or http://www.javascript.com/ (or just use Google ).


Auto Loan Surge Fuels Fears Of Another Subprime Crisis: NPR #fox #auto


#subprime auto lenders
#

Listen to the Story

Auto dealers are extending loans to a growing number of people with weak credit.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The number of Americans buying autos approached a record high last year. It’s one more sign of how much the economy is improving.

But there’s a big potential downside that’s evoking comparisons to the subprime mortgage boom. Auto dealers are extending loans to a growing number of people with weak credit, and more of them are having trouble making payments.

When Chris Westervelt moved from Texas to Alaska to take a job, he decided to trade in his Mazda for a car that could handle snow and ice.

“I started looking at vehicles that had four-wheel drive capabilities and I ended up settling on a Jeep Wrangler,” Westervelt says.

He went to a dealer and test drove a car. “They said, ‘Go ahead and take the Jeep home, you know, come back sometime tomorrow and, you know, we’ll get everything settled,’ ” Westervelt says. “So, after driving around a little and coming back, the store manager actually got a little aggressive with me. He’s like, ‘You’ve already put 200 miles on my Jeep. What am I going to do? I can’t resell this,’ ” Westervelt says.


How to automatically redirect a browser to another web page from one of your own #auto #loan #calculators


#auto web
#

Server-based redirect

This is the preferred method of redirecting to other web pages, and additional information can be found at http://www.w3.org/QA/Tips/reback.

As the P-A Department’s main web server uses the Apache HTTP server program, here is how to do it on that system (for other systems’ servers, see the references in the www.w3.org web page noted above).

Create a file in the directory in question called ” .htaccess ” and put into it the line

Redirect /path-of-file-to-be-redirected URL-of-page-to-go-to

For example, if you are a professor teaching the (fictitious – for the sake of the example only) PHY386 course during Spring Semester 2007, but you want to keep your web pages in a subdirectory of your own user area instead of in the courses area provided, you can go to the appropriate courses area on the server, /web/documents/courses/2007spring/PHY386 and put

Redirect /courses/2007spring/PHY386/index.html http://www.pa.msu.edu/people/username/subdir/index.htm

(all on one line, in case the above example is wrapped by your browser) into a file called .htaccess which has world-read permissions (that’s the default).

The “path” argument is relative to the “web root”, so in the above example, “/web/documents” is left off. The “page to go to” URL is a full URL, even if the web page is on the same server. More than one Redirect command can be put into the .htaccess file, and you can redirect all files in a directory to their equivalents in a “to go to” directory by leaving the filenames off.

A case where more than one Redirect command may be necessary is when a web page may be accessed via more than one URL. In the above “PHY 386” example, in fact, the instructor will have to add a second line, the same as the first, except for lower-case “phy386” instead of “PHY386” in the “path” argument, because the web page may be accessed with the “phy386” URL, too. During Spring Semester 2007, the page could also be accessed with URLs with “current” in place of “2007spring” and with “2007spring” left out entirely, bringing the number of Redirect commands up to six for that one page. Fortunately, a URL which leaves off the “index.html” filename defaults to assuming it, or else three more Redirect commands would be needed to handle those cases. (The folks at w3.org still consider this as preferable to a single “refresh” meta command in the file itself, which would be read and acted upon regardless of how the file was accessed, as described below.)

If there is already a .htaccess file in the subdirectory in question, see the Apache HTTP server documentation to see where in it the Redirect command should be placed. If you are the person running the Apache web server program on a system, you can also put instances of the Redirect command into the server configuration file instead of, or in addition to. htaccess files in specific subdirectories (again, see the Apache HTTP server documentation for the details).

“refresh” meta command

Note that this method is deprecated by the official HTML standards organization in favor of the server-based redirect method described above.

You can set up a web page to inform any browser which happens to load it that there is another web page it should go to instead, after an optional delay.

This is accomplished using a “refresh” meta command in the header section of your HTML file, along with the title and any “keywords” or other meta commands.

The syntax for the “refresh” meta command is

meta http-equiv="refresh" content=" N ; URL= other-web-address "

where N is the approximate number of seconds that you want the current web page to be displayed before the browser automatically goes to the other web address. If N = 0. then the browser should go immediately to the other web address.

Netiquette tip

In case someone’s browser doesn’t handle these automatic redirects (most browsers do handle them, but some allow them to be turned off, as a way of discouraging “web spam”, which often uses this type of “refresh” redirect), you may want to provide a second route to the intended destination by way of a standard link (see the example, below).

Select Example above or here to see how the example works in practice.

Notes on scripting languages

There are also ways of doing this with JavaScript, VBscript, and other internal web page scripting languages, but explaining them in detail is beyond the scope of this web page. A few examples may illustrate the method, however, and encourage users to obtain actual JavaScript documentation (a book, or online) to guide them in developing their own variants suited to their own needs.

The following JavaScript example, which would go ahead of the first html flag on the web page, or between the HEAD and /HEAD tags, opens the new site in the same browser window (effectively instead of the rest of the contents of the page that the script is in):

This JavaScript example opens the new site in the same browser window after displaying the current page in the window for 2 seconds (2000 ms):

(Note that this does exactly what the HTML META tag above does, but as the META tag method does not depend on the browser’s having JavaScript available and active, in most cases the META tag method would be preferable).

The next JavaScript example opens the new site in a new * browser window:

This JavaScript example opens the new site in a new browser window after a 4.5 second (4500 ms) delay:

WARNING: With these capabilities for automatic redirection to other web pages, it is possible to set up a redirection loop — try to avoid making it a no-wait-time infinite loop! (An infinite loop with a reasonable delay, on the other hand, might have its uses as a sort of slide show, among other possibilities). Still have questions? Try sites such as http://www.w3.org/. http://httpd.apache.org/. http://www.iis.net/ or http://www.javascript.com/ (or just use Google ).